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Ontopic Discussion => General Discussion => Topic started by: Ididntcomeback on March 19, 2009, 12:51:22 AM



Title: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on March 19, 2009, 12:51:22 AM
The new book ? BLOWN FOR GOOD is almost done and we are about to begin final production!

Well, as part of the initial sales of the book, we have consulted past authors of books that have been done on this subject. Some of these authors completed the books and they never saw the light of day. Some past books were printed and certain people bought up all of the copies while the publishers were slapped with frivolous suits or threats of suits and frightened out of producing more copies.

Well, the good people at BFG Inc and their lawyers have figured out some ways to get around these silly games.

We want all those who want a copy of the new BFG book to register themselves for a copy. All this takes is an email address. Once we get so many pre-orders we will send out an email that says the book is ready for ordering and where to go to get your copy. We even put up a counter on the pre-register page so you can keep track of how many pre-orders there are.

Because the publisher of this book is confidential, and the first printing amount is confidential, all those who pre-register will get their copies before anyone can swoop in and buy up the copies in bulk.

NO bulk sales of the book will be done until every pre-registered person has had 2 full weeks to get a copy.

Now as the book is a detailed explanation of violations of labor laws and abuses over a 15 year period, any retaliation, attempted cease and desist or otherwise silencing of this book will be against the law based on the current labor and wages abuses lawsuit that is pending. So we have covered all bases here and plan to get this book out to the people. With all of the data, they should be able to make an accurate decision on whether this group should be attacked, harmed or suppressed or helped.

Some details about the book. We plan to sell the book in to all countries of the world. It will be a hardcover book. It will have pictures and all sorts of details about stuff you have read about from BFG over the years all over the net. Most of the stories you read about on the boards were excerpts or small parts of the overall book itself. The book goes into much more detail and has basically 15 years worth of information on everything from why certain buildings never get built to what Dave likes to wear to bed at night! This book will be a must read for Scientologists and critics alike.

We plan to accept PAYPAL, all major credit cards, checks, money order, cash, food stamps, and certain favors as payment via the web, mail and back alley meetings.

So go www.blownforgood.com and reserve yourself a copy! It is on the left hand side of the site.

If all goes as planned, we should be able to have printed books shipping out in the next few months.

Until next time?
BFG
_________________
If you knew what I know
And I am sure you would
You would do what I did
And be BLOWNFORGOOD!


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: anonyrat on March 19, 2009, 09:22:47 PM
I wonder if it will be available in New Zealand?


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on September 13, 2010, 10:46:46 AM
                                         "The Symphony of Leif,"

by Paul Y. Csige (CsiMec, Inc., $14.95 through Amazon.com)

Csige is a scarily talented young fellow from Kailua-Kona who seems able to do just about anything. His latest effort is this coming-of-age novel — apparently, a disguised memoir — about a teenage lad sent off from Hawaii to attend a Scientology boarding school in the Pacific Northeast. Everything seems swell until he realizes that the teachers are more interested in indoctrination than in learning.

The thing about coming-of-age novels is that the protagonist comes out the other end changed. They're about metamorphosis. There's room, sure, for settling old scores — and teenage horrors stick with you for life — but the hero is essentially mutable clay, fired by experience.

Csige seems to understand the process instinctively, and also sets up a natural rhythm in the storytelling that matches the adolescent goofiness of a boy trying to grow up.

Review

http://www.staradvertiser.com/features/featuresstories/20100912_copious_phrasing_interrupts_kona_writers_novel.html

The Book site

http://www.thesymphonyofleif.com/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on October 18, 2010, 08:52:36 PM
Janet Reitman, reknowned journalist and contributing editor for Rolling Stone magazine, is expanding from and following up on her epic 2006 RS magazine article on scientology with a new book:

          Inside Scientology: The Story of America's Most Secretive Religion
 Originally Posted by Amazon.com
Inside Scientology: The Story of America's Most Secretive Religion [Hardcover]
List Price: $28.00
Amazon Price: $18.48

Product Description:

Scientology, created in 1954 by a prolific sci-fi writer named L. Ron Hubbard, claims to be the world's fastest growing religion, with millions of members around the world and huge financial holdings. Its celebrity believers keep its profile high, and its teams of "volunteer ministers" offer aid at disaster sites such as Haiti and the World Trade Center. But Scientology is also a notably closed faith, harassing journalists and others through litigation and intimidation, even infiltrating the highest levels of the government to further its goals. Its attacks on psychiatry and its requirement that believers pay into the tens and even hundreds of thousands of dollars for salvation have drawn scrutiny and skepticism. And ex-members use the Internet to share stories of harassment and abuse.

Now Janet Reitman offers the first full journalistic history of the Church of Scientology, in an evenhanded account that at last establishes the astonishing truth about the controversial religion. She traces Scientology's development from the birth of Dianetics to today, following its metamorphosis from a pseudoscientific self-help group to a worldwide spiritual corporation with profound control over its followers and even ex-followers.

Based on five years of research, unprecedented access to Church officials, confidential documents, and extensive interviews with current and former Scientologists, this is the defining book about a still-unknown world.

Product details
Hardcover: 400 pages
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (HMH) (5 July 2011)
Language English
ISBN-10: 0618883029
ISBN-13: 978-0618883028

http://forums.whyweprotest.net/15-media/reitman-book-inside-scientology-story-americas-most-secretive-religion-72339/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on November 26, 2010, 01:21:57 PM
              Inside Scientology: The Story of America's Most Secretive Religion

Out in 2011.
Janet Reitman (Author)
http://www.amazon.com/Inside-Scientology-Americas-Secretive-Religion/dp/0618883029

Here is Janet, who works for "Rolling Stone being interviewed . Obviously before Rinder blew. As he defends the cult with his expertise in communication.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5BH3o94rRZk


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on December 01, 2010, 08:48:51 PM

                        French book on Scientology's political infiltrations.


Author Emmanuel Fansten just sent me a copy of his new book about the political infiltrations Scientology perpetrated in France, including duping the French President.
The political intrigue goes deep.

SCIENTOLOGIE: AUTOPSY D'UNE SECTE D'ETAT

SCIENTOLOGY: AUTOPSY ON A NATIONAL CULT --- approx translation (?)

It is not about the so called religious nature of the sect but about OSA based manipulations and covert operations.

Published by a national publishing house "Robert Laffont", so this has top level credibility in France.

Brief book review
A brief review of
Scientologie: Autopsie d'une secte d'État by Emmanuel Fansten
Published by Éditions Robert Laffont, 2010, 235 pages.

The word "autopsie" in the title of journalist Emmanuel Fansten's recently published book is no doubt premature, but this book does offer a fascinating and spellbinding post mortem review of more than twenty years of Scientology-related events, particularly in France and the United States.

Fansten quotes confidential source material which illustrates that France's willingness to condemn and to prosecute Scientology became a contentious issue in Franco-American diplomatic relations after the Church of Scientology reached a secret agreement with the United States Internal Revenue Service in 1993 granting Scientology tax-exempt status. Defusing tensions between France and the United States was part of Nicolas Sarkozy's political strategy in his drive toward the French presidency, and this plus the post-September 11 climate explains why, as Interior Minister in 2002, Sarkozy instructed the Renseignements Généraux, the French equivalent of the FBI, to stop monitoring cults as it had been doing since the mid-1990s, and why, as Finance Minister in August 2004, Sarkozy held a high-profile meeting with Tom Cruise. Scientology's 2009 Paris trial for organized fraud was deemed so sensitive that the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs set up a special religion desk to manage the international repercussions.

Infiltration, trickery, and "accidental errors" are common threads of the stories in this book. In 1996, while a report on cults was presented to the French National Assembly, Danièle Gounord, the spokesperson for Scientology in France, and two other Scientologists mysteriously appeared in the seats reserved for the guests of cabinet ministers. An investigation revealed that a parliamentarian was tricked into inviting them. In 1998, one and a half of the ten volumes of documents concerning a fraud case against Scientology disappeared in the Paris Court House after Judge Marie-Paule Morracchini placed the files on a table for delivery to a clerk. The ensuing investigation identified a suspect but failed to find enough evidence to lay charges. In 1999, files were "accidentally" destroyed while another Scientology fraud investigation was under way in Marseille; the substitute prosecutor in that case was Solange Moracchini, sister of Judge Marie-Paule Moracchini. In 2009, a cut-and-paste error in the text of a revised law deleted the provision that would have allowed the court to order the dissolution of Scientology in France. The book gives many more such examples.

Fansten also mentions academics who have written complacent articles about Scientology and famous persons who have signed petitions criticizing the treatment of Scientology in Germany, some of them not realizing that their names would be splashed on full-page newspaper ads defending Scientology. Film director Costa-Gavras, for instance, told Fansten that he signed a petition as nothing more than a friendly gesture to John Travolta.

Exploitation of celebrities in France and America, WISE businesses managed along Scientology principles, attempts to infiltrate Masonic lodges, Operation Snow White, Operation Freakout, the birth of Anonymous, Marc Headley's story, the resignation of Paul Haggis, all this and a wealth of other details are covered in Emmanuel Fansten's book. As attorney Graham Berry told Fansten, "The last time a group carried this much weight and influence in the United States, it was the Mafia during J. Edgar Hoover's reign at the FBI." Given the current mass desertions from Scientology and the description of Scientology leader David Miscavige as a brutal sociopath, it is quite possible that Miscavige might, like founder L. Ron Hubbard, end his life as a fugitive.

Note: A few of the events related in Emmanuel Fansten's book are described in the documentary The Mystery of the Missing Files (in French with English subtitles).

http://forums.whyweprotest.net/291-scientology-discussion/french-book-scientologys-political-infiltrations-74065/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on February 09, 2011, 09:05:41 AM
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt to Publish the First Complete Account of Scientology


Inside Scientology by Rolling Stone journalist Janet Reitman to be published on July 5, 2011
February 08, 2011 11:16 AM Eastern Time

BOSTON--(EON: Enhanced Online News)--Houghton Mifflin Harcourt’s Trade and Reference Division today announced that it will publish Inside Scientology: The Story of America’s Most Secretive Religion, based on confidential documents, more than 100 interviews with current and former Scientologists, and five years of research. This book confirms the astonishing truth within the controversial religion.

   

Pulitzer Prize winning author Lawrence Wright (who mentions the book in his current New Yorker piece about Paul Haggis’ defection from Scientology) praises Inside Scientology, calling it “an engrossing, groundbreaking work that brings a welcome sense of fair-mindedness to a subject that is, for many journalists and scholars, too hot to touch.”

Scientology conjures images of its celebrity believers, its notably aggressive response to criticism or its attacks on psychiatry, and its requirement that believers pay as much as hundreds of thousands of dollars to reach the highest levels of salvation. In Inside Scientology Reitman reveals all, starting with how the singular L. Ron Hubbard transformed a self-help group into a worldwide spiritual corporation.

As Hubbard became increasingly paranoid and reclusive, a young acolyte named David Miscavige assumed control. After Hubbard’s death in 1986, Miscavige quickly purged the ranks and began to transform the church once again. Miscavige has overseen some of the church’s greatest triumphs — among them a controversial billion-dollar IRS tax exemption and Tom Cruise’s emergence as a vocal advocate — but he has also created a climate of fear and intimidation, according to ex-members whose stories of abuse Reitman shares. Reitman is the first to examine Miscavige’s twenty-five year reign and what it might mean for the future of the church.

Inside Scientology is an utterly compelling work of nonfiction and the defining work on an elusive faith.

Janet Reitman was a finalist for a National Magazine Award in 2007 for the story “Inside Scientology,” from which this book grew. She is a contributing editor at Rolling Stone. Her work has appeared in GQ, Men’s Journal, the Los Angeles Times Sunday Magazine, and the Washington Post, among other publications. She holds a master’s degree in journalism from Columbia University.

http://eon.businesswire.com/news/eon/20110208006752/en/Houghton-Mifflin-Harcourt-Publish-Complete-Account-Scientology



Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on March 19, 2011, 08:59:11 AM
                                   ExOT8Michael book project.

                       March 19 2011

    In order to "uncelebrate" the 100th anniversary (no "birthday", as he is extremely dead) of the fake guru Hubbard I am intending to write a book to debunk Scientology from a very new viewpoint.
    I think the world need to know what I have to say. Too many people have been scammed by Scientology, and the fraud continues. Anonymous has weakened the cult and that is "epic win", but more needs to be done.

    I am just going to leave this here.

    *********

    Details:

    I had direct experience of being a Scientologist from 1973 to 1997. I went from "raw public" to OT8 and spent about half a million dollars to do it. I knew Hubbard's children and the top trained Scientologists and was a very top Scientologist "public" person.
    I was a staff member for almost 3 years, and a "Scientology celebrity" (with the same handlers and connections as all the other celebs in the cult) for over 15 years.
    I had close and frequent association and friendships with top Scientology executives, mostly in Clearwater as an OT7 and OT8.
    After a very costly and difficult six year internal fight against injustice I got from Scientology management from 1991 to 1997 I left Scientology and filed a major lawsuit against DM and all the relevant Scientology corporations. I knew I was putting myself at high risk but I decided to go ahead anyhow. Rather than lose the case in Court (as they surely would have) the Scientology cult litigation mob chose to abuse the Justice System, engage in illegal actions they could "get away with", as well as over-litigating to bankrupt both me and my attorney, Graham Berry. Due to being bankrupted I was forced to drop the case.
    The experiences I had in Scientology were unique, and insights I gained about the workings of this insidious cult have not yet been published, especially in a book. I have been "healing" from this bad experience since 1997, and part of that was to make notes of the insights I had about the cult and how it manipulates people. Those (large amount of) notes will be the book contents. Those insightful notes are fully ready to be written up.
    A main viewpoint of this book will be why Hubbard technology is a trap for innocent people, and how it does that. It will also contain examples of why the "tech" does not work in fact.

    ********

    Here's why I post this here (and please feel free to cross post this in full to other sites).
    I can write the book but I need time to do it, and funds to make that time available. I work 3 jobs to make ends meet but have no extra money to make the time to write such a book as this.
    I am asking for help with this aspect of getting the book done.

    People can help by donating, or abstain from helping, as they wish. I have never asked for anything on here before for my own interests, and that is not the aim here. I think this is of general interest and importance so is a wider social matter than just "all about me". I don't feel any need or desire to do anything all about me anyways.

    I am asking for donations, but if folks want something for their cash in return I am willing to send art reproductions of my artworks (www.mpattinson.smugmug.com) in appropriate measure to give good value. The help I get will be very appreciated, and I respect anonymity of Anons totally (as I have since 2008).

    I will create the book with the resources I may receive, so if I get big help = big book, small help = small book. LOL Time is money.
    It will be nice to get this info out.
    I can self publish this if no other publisher gets interested, so it will get done.
    I am sure we will come up with a great title.

    *********

    Logistics;

    PM; here on WWP as ExOT8Michael

    My email : mpattinson@gmail.com

    ...which is my PayPal email account, so you can donate there if you want to.

    My address (which has never been a secret) for money orders or travelers checks anonymously or personally sent, or for checks or whatever. Thanks !!! in advance for your generosity. Love U guise.

    Michael Pattinson
    1320 Miller Drive, West Hollywood, California, USA 90069.

exOT8Michael, Today at 12:15 PM



http://forums.whyweprotest.net/threads/exot8michael-book-project.78098/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on March 21, 2011, 08:53:25 AM
New PDF version of "L.Ron Hubbard - Messiah or Madman?" by Brent Croydon

http://forums.whyweprotest.net/threads/new-pdf-version-of-l-ron-hubbard-messiah-or-madman-by-brent-croydon.78087/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on April 04, 2011, 07:43:36 AM
http://www.xenu.net/archive/books/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on April 07, 2011, 07:01:36 PM
This time. Not a book. But a movie.

             Filmfest DC 2011: Films that entertain and bear urgent witness


.....But a core sample taken from the more than 70 features at this year’s Filmfest D.C. reveals films of even more significant and timely substance. This year the festival will feature two U.S. premieres: “Scientology: The Truth About a Lie,” Jean-Charles Deniau’s chronicle of L. Ron Hubbard’s organization and former devotees who spent millions of dollars before breaking free.

While “Scientology” doesn’t break any new formal ground, hewing to formulaic stock footage and talking heads, the film nonetheless provides chilling insights into a notoriously difficult world for outsiders to peer into....

http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/filmfest-dc-2011-films-that-entertain-and-bear-urgent-witness/2011/04/06/AFyolPrC_story.html


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on June 04, 2011, 01:25:09 PM
                            Book Review: Inside Scientology

    ** PRESS RELEASE **

    Houghton Mifflin Harcourt to Publish
    the First Complete Account of Scientology

    Inside Scientology
    by Rolling Stone journalist Janet Reitman
    to be published on July 5, 2011

    February 08, 2011 11:16 AM Eastern Daylight Time

    BOSTON--(EON: Enhanced Online News)--Houghton Mifflin Harcourt’s Trade and Reference Division today announced that it will publish Inside Scientology: The Story of America’s Most Secretive Religion, based on confidential documents, more than 100 interviews with current and former Scientologists, and five years of research.

    This book confirms the astonishing truth within the controversial religion.

    Pulitzer Prize winning author Lawrence Wright (who mentions the book in his current New Yorker piece about Paul Haggis’ defection from Scientology) praises Inside Scientology, calling it “an engrossing, groundbreaking work that brings a welcome sense of fair-mindedness to a subject that is, for many journalists and scholars, too hot to touch.”

    Scientology conjures images of its celebrity believers, its notably aggressive response to criticism or its attacks on psychiatry, and its requirement that believers pay as much as hundreds of thousands of dollars to reach the highest levels of salvation. In Inside Scientology Reitman reveals all, starting with how the singular L. Ron Hubbard transformed a self-help group into a worldwide spiritual corporation.

    As Hubbard became increasingly paranoid and reclusive, a young acolyte named David Miscavige assumed control. After Hubbard’s death in 1986, Miscavige quickly purged the ranks and began to transform the church once again. Miscavige has overseen some of the church’s greatest triumphs — among them a controversial billion-dollar IRS tax exemption and Tom Cruise’s emergence as a vocal advocate — but he has also created a climate of fear and intimidation, according to ex-members whose stories of abuse Reitman shares. Reitman is the first to examine Miscavige’s twenty-five year reign and what it might mean for the future of the church.

    Inside Scientology is an utterly compelling work of nonfiction and the defining work on an elusive faith.

    Janet Reitman was a finalist for a National Magazine Award in 2007 for the story “Inside Scientology,” from which this book grew. She is a contributing editor at Rolling Stone. Her work has appeared in GQ, Men’s Journal, the Los Angeles Times Sunday Magazine, and the Washington Post, among other publications. She holds a master’s degree in journalism from Columbia University.

    Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

The book will be released July 5th or possibly sooner on Amazon. June 13th for the Kindle version, as far as I can tell.

I've been reading the book most of the day (advance copy) and will give a bit of a review over the weekend when I have more time.

It's over 400 pages long and is very well written as you'd expect, coming from a first-rate author like Janet Reitman. Just superb writing and research. The author, not being an ex-Scio, really knows her stuff and is very well versed and comfortable with this vast subject and its 60-70 year time span. I felt I was reading a book by someone who had been in for many years.

On the acknowledgments page, Janet mentions most all the well-known modern-day critics and whistle blowers on the Internet today. She's interviewed all of them.

The notes for each chapter at the end of the book are thorough and an education in themselves. Very interesting notes and I've read about everything there is about the subject.

Bibliography, thorough and excellent.

Since I've read most all of the other published books about LRH and Scientology, I've encountered most of the information in the early chapters. It's all presented well, though maybe not in as much detail as compared to the Miller book.

However, this book updates the events of the past 20 years and current events quite well, which is the point of it.

I'll write a bit more about each section over the weekend, but I'll say one more thing.

The chapters DM and Power is Assumed, for me, were phenomenal. Worth the price of admission as they say. Though I've read a lot on the Internet, almost everything available, the author threads together the entire story from the time period just before LRH's death through to the ousting of Pat Broeker and unfortunate fate of Annie Broeker. All the delicious details are there. Stuff I never knew and written so one gets what happened and how. No names left out. Good stuff.

For me, no mystery now about how "the power" was usurped and held, though amazing that it could have happened at all. (Guess who's gonna have a bad day when he reads those chapters.)

Introduction
Part 1

    1. The Founder
    2. Dianetics
    3. The Franchised Faith

Part 2

    4 Bridge to Total Freedom
    5.Travels with the Commodore
    6. Over the Rainbow
    7. DM
    8. Power is Assumed

Part 3

    9. Lisa
    10. Flag
    11. Seventeen Days
    12 The Greatest Good

Part 4

    13. The Celebrity Strategy
    14. The Seduction of Tom Cruise
    15.The Bubble
    16. Int
    17. Exodus

Epilogue
Notes
Selected Bibliography


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on June 07, 2011, 05:22:05 PM
Scientology: Christmas Comes Early with TWO New Books on Hubbard's Wacky Cabal
By Tony Ortega, Mon., Jun. 6 2011 at 3:52 PM
Comments (16)
Categories: Scientology
Share3
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​This Scientology watcher is beside himself with joy. In the past couple of days, we've received not one but TWO new advance copies of new books on Scientology.

One, an academic approach put out by the Princeton University Press, the other, a likely blockbuster by Rolling Stone contributing editor Janet Reitman.

Oh, is my subway reading going to be a hoot!

Reitman's expose, Inside Scientology, has been anticipated since her similarly titled 2007 Rolling Stone article. Promises the back cover: "A revelatory, page-turning investigation that pulls back the curtain on life inside Scientology." Woo-hoo!


​Several days before Reitman's book arrived, however, a similar-looking volume arrived in the mail. I hadn't heard about this one at all. Ohio State University professor Hugh B. Urban says he set out to write about Scientology from an academic perspective, and keep above the fray that surrounds the controversial group. Well, good luck with that! I'm really looking forward to diving into his The Church of Scientology: A History of a New Religion.

It's really exciting to see this kind of material finally getting serious, mainstream attention, after some of us have toiled for many years trying to warn the public about Hubbard's wacky cabal.

Now, I have to get to reading!


tortega@villagevoice.com | @VoiceTonyO

Tony Ortega is the editor-in-chief of The Village Voice. Since 1995, he's been writing about Scientology at several publications. Among his other stories about L. Ron Hubbard's organization:

The Larry Wollersheim Saga -- Scientology Finally Pays For Its Fraud
The Tory Bezazian (Christman) Story -- How the Internet Saved A Scientologist From Herself
The Jason Beghe Defection -- A Scientology Celebrity Goes Rogue
The Robert Cipriano Case -- A Hellacious Example of Fair Game
The Paul Haggis Ultimatum -- The 'Crash' Director Tells Scientology to Shove It
The Marc Headley Escape -- 'Tom Cruise Told Me to Talk to a Bottle'
The Aaron Saxton Accusation -- Australia turns up the heat on Scientology
The Jefferson Hawkins Stipulation -- Scientology's former PR genius comes clean
The Daniel Montalvo Double-Cross -- Scientology lures a young defector into a trap
A Church Myth Debunked -- Scientology and Proposition 8
Daniel Montalvo Strikes Back -- Scientology Hit with Stunning Child-Labor Lawsuits
When Scientologists Attack -- The Marty Rathbun Intimidation
A Scientologist Excommunicated -- The Michael Fairman SP Declaration
The Richard Leiby Operation -- Investigating a reporter's divorce to shut him up

http://blogs.villagevoice.com/runninscared/2011/06/scientology_chr.php


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on June 09, 2011, 06:42:30 PM
     Scientology's Anti-Commie, Space Opera Beginnings, and Other Nuggets From New Academic Book


There's a new academic treatise on Scientology coming out this September, and it's a very welcome addition to the literature surrounding L. Ron Hubbard's odd organization.

Hugh B. Urban, Ohio State University religious studies professor, has given us, in his Princeton University Press tome, a history that does its best to keep above the fray between claims and counterclaims about Scientology, and for the most part, he succeeds.

But along the way, if Urban is somewhat charitable to Hubbard at times, The Church of Scientology: A History of a New Religion also holds very little back about the controversies that Scientology has found itself in, and that are largely of its own making.

For this longtime Scientology watcher, much of the material in the book was familiar, but Urban's book is valuable for how well he organizes a massive amount of information in a well-paced, enjoyable read, and in only 216 pages.

Throughout that journey, what Urban does better than most is continually put Scientology's bumpy beginnings and notorious scandals in a larger context of American history and the development of American culture and ideas about religion.


From the start, for example, Urban skillfully portrays L. Ron Hubbard and his early ideas about a "science of the mind" as utterly and completely a product of his time. Describing Hubbard as a "bricoleur" -- someone who cobbles together whatever ideas are within his grasp into a kind of pastiche -- Urban shows that the pulp science fiction writer was a man of the moment, debuting his Dianetics in 1950, right when a postwar America was hungry for new ideas and new religions.

As Hubbard then develops his "science" into a religion in fits and starts over the next two decades, and plunges it into paranoid secrecy and top-down control, Urban shows how much that was also a product of its time, with Hubbard and Scientology developing against a paranoid Cold War that gripped the American mind.

Repeatedly, Urban gives Hubbard and Scientology credit for reflecting what was going on in society as a whole, and there is no shortage of the church's point of view about its various controversies. But for the most part, those controversies are delivered in healthy portions. We get at least something -- including copious original quotations -- about many familiar Scientology waterloos:


This is page one of three..

The rest can be found here...

http://blogs.villagevoice.com/runninscared/2011/06/scientologys_an.php


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on June 14, 2011, 08:44:18 PM
       'Inside Scientology' Promises a Lot, And Delivers: David Miscavige Has Much to Worry About


Page 1

Next month, Janet Reitman's book Inside Scientology will hit bookshelves, and the world of Scientology-watching, and for Scientology itself, will never be the same.

Subtitled The Story of America's Most Secretive Religion, Reitman's book delivers all it promises, and it promises a lot.

"It has been my goal to write the first objective modern history of the Church of Scientology," Reitman proclaims in her introduction. "It is the goal of Inside Scientology to translate [L. Ron Hubbard's arcane] language and separate myth from fact."

That's a big project. And by the end of its 369 pages, you should be convinced that Reitman has not only made good on her goals, but has put together the most masterfully written, narratively rewarding, and thorough yarn about L. Ron Hubbard, David Miscavige, and Scientology and its strange past, present, and possible future.

JanetReitman.jpg
Janet Reitman
​Having said that, this longtime Scientology-watcher must admit to some early misgivings with Ms. Reitman's hefty book. Just a few pages after promising to deliver so much, on page 3 of the advance copy Reitman got the year of L. Ron Hubbard's death wrong. (I was promised a final copy of the book, and chances are this error will be fixed.) And in the ensuing pages of Hubbard's early history, there were several glaring omissions that had me worried about her approach. How, I wondered, do you mention Hubbard's college career without pointing out that the self-proclaimed "nuclear physicist" had failed the only class in nuclear physics that he attempted? How also do you spend several pages recounting the infamous occult collaboration between Hubbard and Cal Tech rocket scientist Jack Parsons and leave out the best part, their kinky attempt to create a "moonchild?"

Gradually, however, it became clear that what Reitman had chosen to put in her book was building to the best overall narrative about Hubbard and his creation since such early pioneers as Russell Miller (Barefaced Messiah) and, in particular, Jon Atack's masterful account of the church's early years, A Piece of Blue Sky. Both books, especially Atack's, are not easy to find. Reitman's will be in bookstores all over the country.

That should present a serious problem for Scientology's current dictator, David Miscavige. He does not come off well in this book at all.

If Hubbard's final years turned him into a pathetic, secretive, paranoid germophobe who resembled an end-stage Howard Hughes, the science fiction writer was at least worldly enough to know how to bend his own rules rather than alienate loyal followers. Miscavige, on the other hand, comes off as a case of arrested development who is so dictatorial and unwavering, he's scared off legions of followers in what Reitman calls a "mass exodus."

Along the way, Reitman revisits many of the familiar milestones of Scientology's history, but has done such a good job with original research and interviewing eyewitnesses from every era of the organization's development that she can weave a page-turning narrative no matter how arcane the material.

Using the personal stories of recent defectors such as Jeff Hawkins, Marc Headley and his wife Claire -- all familiar to Voice readers -- and many others, older periods of the church's evolution are made new and exciting. Hawkins, for example. provides the personal touch that helps explain how Hubbard moved the central hub of his creation from a large manor in England to a ship that plied the Mediterranean and the Caribbean, and finally ended up taking over a town in Florida.

For me, the book really kicked into high gear with Reitman's thorough and gripping tale about how David Miscavige emerged as a gung-ho young member of the Sea Org and then engineered his way to the highest levels of the church, ultimately toppling Pat Broeker as Hubbard's assumed successor after Hubbard's death in 1986. I've never seen this history told so well and with such authority.

Equally brilliant, Reitman chooses to tell the next phase of Scientology's history through the eyes of Lisa McPherson.

Page 2 and 3 available here...

http://blogs.villagevoice.com/runninscared/2011/06/inside_scientol_1.php


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on June 25, 2011, 04:10:54 PM
          Janet Reitman: An Interview with the Author of Inside Scientology
By Tony Ortega Fri., Jun. 24 2011

On Tuesday, we sat down with Janet Reitman, author of the terrific new book Inside Scientology: The Story of America's Most Secretive Religion, which is just hitting bookstores and will be released officially in July.

Inside Scientology is a masterful telling of the Scientology's history, from L. Ron Hubbard's pulp fiction career in the 1930s to events happening just last year as an Independence movement splits with current Scientology leader David Miscavige. Along the way, Reitman brilliantly focuses on individuals like Jeff Hawkins and Nancy Many and Lisa McPherson to help us understand the appeal of Hubbard and his "technology," as well as the controversies that have rocked the organization over many decades.

We wanted to know: who is Janet Reitman, and how did she put together such an amazing book?

"I was your typical struggling freelancer for years and years," she says while we're sitting in the conference room at a warren of small offices in DUMBO. She'd even interned at the Voice, she let me know. But it was international reporting that she was determined to do after finishing Columbia University's journalism graduate program in 1992. That eventually took her to Rolling Stone, which sent her to Iraq for most of 2004. After 8 months covering the war, she says her editors wanted to find something else for her to do in 2005.

"Tom Cruise was jumping all over couches, right?" she says with a laugh. "I think my editors had wanted to do something on Scientology for a long time. I was basically the 'Iraq War girl' at that point and they were concerned that I was incredibly burnt, that I would get PTSD, that I needed something else to do. So my editor pitched this to me. 'You'll embed with them. Why don't you write them a letter saying you'd like to embed with the Church of Scientology.' Of course the church said no."

What she did instead is how her book starts, she points out. "I went to the New York org [on 46th St.]...I was basically myself. I think I switched the spelling of my last name by one letter. And I told them I was a creative writer, that I had just finished graduate work at Columbia (which I had, but it was ten years before). I told just a couple of fibs about my circumstances. I did tell them about my boyfriend -- I mean, I didn't tell them his name, but I was pretty honest. I told them I wanted to quit smoking and was stressed in general.

"That was my first experience. And I came back from that first day going, 'What's wrong with this group? I'm not seeing anything that wrong. It worked.' So that made me think, this shit works on me and I'm a really skeptical person, then what's the deal?

"After a couple of days I went through an incredibly exhausting orientation lecture with a guy, it was just me and him in a room. He started telling me all about what Scientology is, all the terminology. All the specific L. Ron Hubbard things about engrams. Some of it sounded pretty existential. I asked him if he'd read any existential philosophers, which of course he hadn't read. It became more and more obvious that to if you go to college and study liberal arts you will quickly realize that this is something that's based on lots of different things, and has been disproved in so many ways. And some aspects of it are sort of blatant lies. Like psychiatrists being behind the Holocaust. You know, there are just certain blatant omissions of fact. But if you're someone who doesn't have that kind of education, it sounds so plausible, it sounds really smart.

"The people I met in Scientology, these are smart people. They have to be able to read these books. They are not easy books. These are not dolts. They just haven't had the advantages that some of us have."

After her experience at the New York org, Reitman traveled to Clearwater, Florida, the church's spiritual headquarters, where members travel for high-level training. "It's a bubble. It's a parallel universe," she says, talking about the way Scientologists separate themselves from the rest of society while living inside it. "They seem completely secular and normal. In Clearwater they're the wealthy Scientologists who show up to do their upper-level courses. They don't look like people in a cult. They look like people you would see every day."

Reitman went on several tours of Scientology facilities at Clearwater and says she worked hard to get the church's point of view on various matters. In all, she worked nine months on her story for Rolling Stone. Then, in January 2006, just before publication, she sent a list of additional questions to Mike Rinder, who at that time was the church's chief spokesman (he left Scientology the following year and has since become an important critic of the church).

Reitman says Rinder "freaked out" when he received Reitman's list of questions, telling her that she hadn't properly received Scientology's side of the story. So Rolling Stone flew her out for a three-day trip to California.

"I got a three-day trip with Mike Rinder and Tommy Davis, and it was the most extraordinary experience. That was my unique access, and it informed my book. I went out for them basically to spin me. But part of their spinning is to exhaust you, to get you there at 8 in the morning and keep you with them until 8 at night, or 10 at night, when you're jet-lagged from your trip."

Rinder and Davis took her to Scientology's secretive desert base near Hemet, to a prominent Scientology school, and to Scientology's anti-psychiatry front group, the Citizens Commission on Human Rights and other places. Throughout her tours, she says she kept peppering Rinder with difficult questions, and she says he gave "uncensored" responses. "You got the feeling that he was burning to tell more than he could. I have great respect for him," she says. "Mike Rinder informed every page that portrayed the Scientology point of view in my story," she says.

The story was a big hit for the magazine, and her agent told Reitman that multiple publishers were interested in its potential as a book. She wrote a proposal, and it sold immediately. I asked her why publishers might be more interested now in a book on Scientology.

Reitman thought her unprecedented access had helped her sell her book, but that publishers could also see how things had changed in the media's treatment of Scientology. "Tom Cruise was out of control. Because he had become such big news...the whole thing was so weird, it fascinated people. And I think that publishers, I guess, felt that the interest was there," she says.

But Reitman's primary interest wasn't Scientology's celebrities. She wanted to write a book that would capture what L. Ron Hubbard and Scientology had meant to the religion's more prosaic members, to get their point of view and not just rehash the church's many controversies.

"The best lesson that I was ever taught at Rolling Stone by Jann Wenner was to cut out any prejudicial language from anything I wrote, because the material itself is so rich, let it speak for itself. I carried that lesson with me," she says. Despite striving for that objectivity, however, she doesn't know that Scientologists themselves will get to see that she made that effort.

"I don't know if they're going to be able to read the book at all," she says. But it was still important to her not to dismiss their way of thinking. "Scientology is different things to different people. There are people I've met for whom this stuff has worked. Like Natalie Walet. Natalie grew up in the church. She has her own mind. She's going to law school, that's just fantastic. For her this stuff works. I'm not going to judge that. I'm not a religious person myself, but I've certainly met people who believe that the rapture will happen. Who am I to judge what they believe in?"

In particular, she found young people in Scientology amazing to talk to. "Scientology kids are really remarkable," she says. If they are raised somewhat in a bubble, they impressed her with how focused they are and how well they present themselves. "Most kids are not able to communicate or be present with you in a conversation in the way Scientology kids are." On the other hand: "I meet these kids who are so bright and so together, and yet they couldn't name the two houses of Congress. Their education had been so deficient. What a tragedy."

Also key to maintaining the book's objective view was choosing the right people to interview and portray. "I made a huge point of looking for people -- it was a very arduous task to do this," she says. "What I wanted to avoid were the people who were very outspoken, the well-known critics. They'd been smeared by the church because they had an axe to grind. I wanted to find people who didn't have an axe to grind."

But just finding people wasn't enough -- she was determined to have them on the record. "I used this argument with them: you have power in numbers. If you all come out and use your names, they can't come after you. But if you do this silently, then they can intimidate you and no one will come to your defense because no one knows who you are."

Reitman's book does strive to get the church's point of view, as well as its critics. But she doesn't hold back on reports of the abuse of church members, and I asked her about that.
 1  |  2 | Next Page >>

http://blogs.villagevoice.com/runninscared/2011/06/janet_reitman_a.php


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on June 28, 2011, 12:39:30 PM
New book released in Germany.

Here is an English translation of the book review.

             MARK JANICELLO – A Scientologist is not allowed to sing
From NEWS.DE-Reporter Isabelle Wiedemeier
June 23, 2011
He played Elvis in a musical, and got arrested for loudly singing “Ave Maria.” Opera
singer Mark Janicello has written an autobiography that reads like an insane film
script. This is the story of an Ex-Scientologist who sang for Religious Freedom

http://www.markjanicello.net/NEWS%20DE%20TRANSLATION.pdf


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on June 28, 2011, 03:47:48 PM
     
                          The Bat Segundo Show: Janet Reitman


Janet Reitman appeared on The Bat Segundo Show #399. She is most recently the author of Inside Scientology.

Including mp3 download...

   http://www.edrants.com/the-bat-segundo-show-janet-reitman/

and....

Inside Scientology by Janet Reitman

The New Yorker had an excellent article telling Paul Haggis' story with Scientology. Inside Scientology was brought up within that story to corroborate some of the details of the Purification Rundown, which is performed to remove body toxins that form a "biochemical barrier to spiritual well-being." Scientology is a controversial subject, due to the many powerful people that subscribe to the beliefs. This book is guaranteed to rock the boat based on the previews alone. Look for a full review in an upcoming issue of Salem Weekly.

~July 5

http://willamettelive.com/story/Shelf_Life_Once_Upon_a_River_Ours_to_Master_and_to_Own_Raoul_Walsh113.html


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on July 05, 2011, 08:14:18 PM
By Kim Christensen Special to the Los Angeles Times

Book review: 'Inside Scientology' by Janet Reitman
Although the compelling, well-researched book lacks blockbuster revelations, it mostly delivers on Reitman's promise of an "objective modern history" of the church.

July 4, 2011
Small wonder that L. Ron Hubbard had the creative chops to parlay his 1950s self-help system, Dianetics, into a worldwide religion — and a very lucrative one at that. Hubbard was, after all, a science-fiction writer, a dreamer, a charming teller of tales and the inventor of much of his own history: He fabricated or embellished aspects of his military service, education and personal adventures, not least of them his purported run-in with a polar bear in the Aleutians.

His most famous invention, of course, was Scientology, a controversial religion-without-a-deity that has its own "technology," galactic story line and quirky vocabulary. It teaches that spiritual freedom — the state of "clear" — can be reached through one-on-one counseling known as auditing, aided by a polygraph-like device called an "e-meter." The sessions, along with extensive training courses, can cost Scientologists hundreds of thousands of dollars.

   

That Scientology has endured for six decades, attracting generations of devotees despite a legacy of secrecy and widespread allegations of intimidation and abuse of its own members, is in itself remarkable. Then again, as Janet Reitman demonstrates in "Inside Scientology: The Story of America's Most Secretive Religion," the church has always found a way, through a "combination of flexibility and mystery" to morph with the times: In its early days in Los Angeles, it reached out to free spirits and hippies, later to celebrities and, more recently, to African Americans and legislators.

Reitman's book, which grew out of an article the Rolling Stone contributing editor wrote for the magazine in 2006, is a well-researched and compelling read, especially for those who start with little knowledge about Scientology, Hubbard or his successor, David Miscavige. While it lacks blockbuster revelations, it mostly delivers on Reitman's promise of an "objective modern history" of the church.

Intertwined with the church's history is that of Miscavige, who spent his teenage years as one of Hubbard's cadre of young aides. He was 25 when he assumed control in 1986, when "LRH" died as a paranoid recluse on a ranch in Creston, Calif., under investigation by the IRS. Miscavige went on to be instrumental in ending "the war" with the IRS and securing the tax-exempt status that deemed Scientology a church, a financial boon.

Sometimes called "the pope of Scientology," Miscavige in the book lives up to previous reports depicting him as a small but intimidating leader, an occasionally unhinged little tyrant alleged to have frequently whomped his top execs. He is said to live much higher on the hog than anyone else, including the elite "Sea Org" members posted to Scientology's international headquarters, or "Int," a former resort near Hemet. Even his beagles, Jelly and Safi, who wore "tiny blue sweaters with commander's bars," fare better than people who have signed billion-year contracts with the church: "Miscavige was known to make his staffers salute the dogs, who held ranks higher than those of many people on the base."

Much of Reitman's material is culled from, and duly credited to, earlier works including Hubbard's own writings, books by his critics and newspaper stories stretching from the Los Angeles Times' groundbreaking series in 1990 to the St. Petersburg Times' multi-part exposé in 2009.

But Reitman obviously has done her own extensive legwork too, digging deep into the details of the death of Lisa McPherson, a "clear" Scientologist who suffered a mental breakdown and died after 17 days in isolation in the church's care in Clearwater, Fla., its spiritual headquarters. Nearly 16 years later, her death is still a rallying point for Scientology's critics.

Reitman also offers up the insights of members from the church's past and present, giving the material a fresh feel and sense of fairness. She balances high-ranking defectors' eyewitness accounts of oppression, abuse and escape with the observations of practicing Scientologists who come across as believers but not robots — and ask some pretty good questions of their own.

"All the people who've come out and told the press these things were in a position to do something about it — to change things," said Natalie Walet, a young Scientologist who doesn't excuse the abuses. "Instead, they stood there and watched. Why?"

It would be easy to deride or dismiss many of Scientology's more eccentric elements, such as the long-held secret story of Xenu, the evil tyrant leader of the "Galactic Confederation." Only after reaching an advanced level are Scientologists taught that he killed his enemies with hydrogen bombs 75 million years ago and then captured their souls, or thetans, and electronically implanted them with false concepts. These altered thetans later glommed on to human bodies, the story goes, causing spiritual harm and havoc for mankind.

Even Tom Cruise, the most famous Scientologist, "freaked out" and was like, 'What the …?''' when he learned of it, according to one former member. But in a nice touch of fair play, another ex-member reminds readers that more mainstream religions also have stories that require a long leap of faith. Water into wine? Raising the dead? How plausible are those?

Hubbard made many claims during his life, but parting the Red Sea was not among them.

http://www.latimes.com/features/books/la-et-book-20110704,0,1203651.story?track=rss


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on July 10, 2011, 11:56:01 AM

Best Books of the Month  Amazon.com

Discover our editors' picks for July--available at 40% off all month long--plus more new releases not to miss, or browse this month's editors' picks in Kindle Books


http://www.amazon.com/Best-Books-of-the-Month/b?ie=UTF8&node=390919011


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on July 12, 2011, 03:53:26 PM
                         The Complex. 


http://shop.ebay.ie/peadar999/m.html


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on July 15, 2011, 04:24:05 PM
          Scientology's Spies, its Prison System, and Training Jerry Seinfeld: The Spectacular Life of Nancy Many

By Tony Ortega Thu., Jul. 14 2011

​In both of the two major books about Scientology coming out this summer, Janet Reitman's Inside Scientology, and Hugh Urban's academic history, The Church of Scientology, we noticed that Nancy Many shows up multiple times. And no wonder: the former Scientologist has lived an amazing life. She happened to be in the right place to take part in or witness some of Scientology's most interesting moments, from working directly with L. Ron Hubbard, to spending time (while five months pregnant) assigned to the prison-detail RPF, to spying for both the Guardian's Office and its successor the Office of Special Affairs, to, years later, testifying in the Lisa McPherson civil trial.

Many put out her own book a couple of years ago, My Billion Year Contract: Memoir of a Scientologist that documents her career. We devoured it recently and then talked to Many about her crazy life.

You were in so many notable places and times. No wonder you show up in both Urban and Reitman's books.

Sometimes when those major things were happening, I would feel like I was in a weird movie.

We noticed that one of your many positions was to work with celebrities. You were even president of the Hollywood Celebrity Centre from 1980 to 1982. But you seemed pretty scrupulous about not mentioning any names. Can you tell us now who were some of the celebrities you worked with?

Jerry Seinfeld, for example.


SERIOUSLY? What can you tell us about Jerry in Scientology. He tends to downplay it today.

He was at the Celebrity Centre in New York. He did a few courses and he did one or two sessions. Then, the first time he want on the Johnny Carson show, in Los Angeles, before the show he came into the Hollywood Celebrity Centre and did his TRs [training routines] to prepare for it. And that's when he was a big hit and his career really took off. Then he went back to the CC in New York.

Was he in much longer after that?

He probably just dribbled out.

You were important to the Lisa McPherson civil lawsuit because you worked as an operative for both the Guardian's Office and its successor the Office of Special Affairs, the covert operations wings of the church. You were able to testify that OSA, despite what the church said, was largely continuing the same policies. In other words, you were able to say with some authority that Scientology has practiced spying operations over a large part of its history. How would you explain to someone unfamiliar with Scientology why it would even NEED a spy wing?

I have no idea why a religion needs a spy organization, especially one that rivals the FBI in sophistication -- as one FBI agent stated after the [1977] raids. I have worked for both and even though OSA says "we are not like the Guardian's Office," they are. They always attack both covertly and overtly. The operation we see on Marty Rathbun is the overt one. There is a corresponding covert action being taken. I do think Marty of all people, is aware of this.

Your experience in the Sea Org's internal prison, the RPF, was so incredible, having to sleep in a smelly parking garage while you were five months pregnant. Later, when you faced the prospect of going back in, you and your husband Chris chose to escape instead. That suggests to me that in some ways, the RPF is something of a mental prison, rather than one with bars. Do you wonder about how many people are on the RPF today, and what would you say to them to help them escape?

No, believe me, Chris and I had to escape. We were being kept separately and with different guards. They had taken our son, and we knew they could make him disappear or hold him hostage. At the time we escaped before we got him, we did not know if the church had already taken him elsewhere to be able to coerce and manipulate them. I am so sorry to say that these days they have motion detectors, cameras everywhere, in addition to the usual separation from the group and being kept under watch. It is disgusting. No pay, or if we got some it might be $10. Illegal living conditions. The best way to get out is like Daniel Montalvo and call someone on the outside and have them work to help you out.

You worked directly with Scientology's founder L. Ron Hubbard. How would you contrast him with what you know of the church's current leader, David Miscavige?

I also did know Miscavige. I first met him at Saint Hill [Saint Hill Manor in West Sussex, England] when he was about 14, then at Flag [in Clearwater, Florida], and then when he would come down to Florida from Gold [Scientology's secretive International headquarters near Hemet, California]. In fact when I was spying for RTC/OSA, they pulled me out...They knew I was burnt out and possibly going to turn. [This was during the time Scientology was suing David Mayo, a man running a rival Hubbard center in Santa Barbara. Many had been sent in to spy on it. She was then asked to help in the ensuing trial, in which Scientology was suing Mayo for copyright infringement.] I was prepped as a witness, but never took the stand. After they won, Miscavige and one of his assistants walked over to me and gave me one of those half hugs, shook my hand and had his arm around one shoulder. He thanked me for my work.

My basic view of the difference is that Hubbard was a human being. Yes, he had his faults, he could get angry. But he also had another side to him. He would go back and help clean up the damage done [by his temper].

Miscavige, on the other hand, feels that Tom Cruise is the greatest Scientologist and doing the most. That hit those of us out (even after many years) as a slap in the face. In Hubbard's time the most important people in Scientology were the Sea Org members. If a celebrity felt the urge to do more, he could work to gain the status called "Honorary Sea Org member." Miscavige denigrates Sea Org members while raising celebrities and other wealthy people to the level of being catered to by Sea Org members. Hubbard would never have done that. Never. Miscavige hurts people in anger, but then never goes back to repair things. Hubbard lived well, he had perks and privileges, but not the ostentatious life that Miscavige is building.

I met Tory Christman very shortly after she left Scientology. Those first months were very difficult for her. You seemed to be "recovering" from Scientology for years. What is it about Scientology, do you think, that makes it difficult to leave and recover from it?

It is very difficult to leave Scientology for many reasons but one of the main ones is the incredible friends you have made. You think: how can I leave them behind? In addition, if you leave you are left in limbo. No Scientologist, whether family, friend, or simply another member, will speak with you, let alone help. Most people after years in this group have lost all contact with any non-scientologists. So where do we go?

What's next for Nancy Many? You figure prominently in Reitman's book. Are you being asked to speak? Are you done with this subject? Are you experiencing any harassment?

I have had minor harassment, but truly none to speak of since Mike Rinder and Marty Rathbun are providing cover. [The two former high-level executives seem to be bearing the brunt of OSA activities. That we know about, at least.] I have gone back to graduate school for the needed degree and training to be a chaplain. I am still being asked to speak, but I pick my avenues. I am still working with the mentally damaged people Scientology creates, and am saddened each time I learn of another suicide. After going through what I went through, one is never fully recovered, you simply have to integrate what happened into your past and move toward the future. It is a work in progress.


tortega@villagevoice.com

http://blogs.villagevoice.com/runninscared/2011/07/scientologys_sp.php


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on July 17, 2011, 05:48:57 PM
         Scientology reviews "Inside Scientology" by Janet Reitman

    Meanwhile, as Janet Reitman continues her reading tour (she'll be at BookHampton in Sag Harbor on July 22), Scientology has put out an official response to her book, Inside Scientology:
    CHURCH OF SCIENTOLOGY STATEMENT

    Janet Reitman's book "Inside Scientology"

    Ms. Reitman's book is filled with inaccuracies. It is neither scholarly nor well‐researched and bears no resemblance to an "inside" story. While preparing her book, Ms. Reitman never contacted the Church and never requested nor interviewed a single Church representative, let alone the ecclesiastical leader of the religion. Ms. Reitman chose to speak exclusively to people outside the Church. She and her publisher refused to accept the Church's offer to provide information. Her "report" is really no different than a view of, say, the Catholic Church told exclusively by lapsed Catholics or defrocked priests and should more accurately be called OUTSIDE SCIENTOLOGY. The book is a rehash of false and baseless allegations largely drawn from stories written by others that have long been disproved, many held inaccurate, by courts of law.

    Despite her claim of "personal interviews and e‐mail exchanges with roughly one hundred former and current Scientologists," Ms. Reitman's book refers to an exchange with only one Scientologist--a single parishioner in five years. Her primary sources of information are a handful of apostates, previous external affairs officers who are admitted perjurers, dismissed and defrocked when their crimes were discovered. These sources have a documented history of making false and defamatory statements against the Church. Their anger and hostility toward the Church should give anyone serious pause.

    Many of Ms. Reitman's sources are also members of or are affiliated with Anonymous, the cyberterrorist organization that has been the subject of federal investigations, arrests and convictions for engaging in hate crimes against the Church and its members. In the past few months Anonymous members have been the subject of intensified global law enforcement investigations involving criminal activities that include violating the privacy of countless innocent people while hacking into accounts at credit card companies, businesses and financial institutions.

    If Ms. Reitman were truly "objective" she would have held these sources and their claims up to a harsh and penetrating light instead of putting them on a pedestal. She would have found, among other things, that they boast arrests, a conviction for pummeling an officer of the court, and a failed lawsuit that a federal judge not only tossed out, but also ordered the plaintiffs to reimburse the Church more than $40,000 in court costs.

    Claims by Ms. Reitman to have engaged in extensive research for her book are laughable. Ms. Reitman has it wrong from the first page of chapter one, where she states, "When Hubbard died in 1985, the world took note..." Mr. Hubbard passed away January 24, 1986.

    Perhaps the most significant illustration of how far outside Scientology her book lies is Ms. Reitman's ignorance of the Church's accomplishments. She could have seen our new Churches in Moscow or Melbourne or any of the dozens opened since 2006 in cities like London, Brussels, Rome, and Washington, D.C., all of them bursting with thousands of new members practicing their chosen faith. Anyone is welcome to experience the Church's practices and see its humanitarian works firsthand: Scientology's global human rights initiative has educated millions on human rights; its "Truth About Drugs" crusade teaches millions how to live drug‐free; and our global Volunteer Ministers disaster relief program has been hailed by the international community.

    Contrary to Ms. Reitman's claims, there is nothing secretive about Scientology. Our Churches, located in major cities around the world, are open seven days a week, 365 days a year. Many have public display areas to answer all questions about Scientology beliefs and practices. Anyone who wants to know the true story of Scientology should find out for themselves by coming to our new Church of Scientology of Tampa, 1911 N 13th Street, Ybor Square, or go to the Churchʹs website, www. Scientology . org.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Well, we didn't expect the church to love the book. But I just wanted to make a couple of observations about Scientology's specific objections.

    First, it's facetious to complain that Reitman didn't interview church representatives. Her book grew out of a lengthy Rolling Stone article that she researched and wrote in 2005 and 2006. During that time, she spent long days with church representatives, including an intense three-day trip to California with Scientology spokesman Mike Rinder.

    Scientology is playing games by saying that her book contains no contact with the current church. Rinder left in 2007, after Reitman had worked with him. It's really not her fault that it took so long to get her book published. As she explained to me, there was a delay when her publisher merged with another company. It also takes a long time to edit and fact check a book like this. Scientology knows quite well that Reitman did her best to talk to get Scientology's point of view when she was doing the bulk of her research in 2005 and 2006. It's not her fault that, as part of its dwindling fortunes, Scientology has lost the people that she talked to then.

    Scientology's response spends a paragraph complaining that Reitman talked to people in Anonymous. Funny, but in her 369-page book, that's all she dedicates to the group as well -- one paragraph.

    It is true that Reitman's book early on gets the year of Hubbard's death wrong. That's a mistake I myself pointed out in my review. Later in the book, however, she not only gets this date correct, but provides many details about Hubbard's death. So the mistake on page 3 is clearly just a typo and not proof that she didn't "engage in extensive research."
    Finally, for the Church of Scientology to say that there's "nothing secretive" about itself is the kind of thing we love about this wacky group. We don't really need to point out that no other religion has filed so many lawsuits over the decades http://blogs.villagevoice.com/runninscared/2011/07/scientology_is.phpto keep its teachings secret, do we?

    http://blogs.villagevoice.com/runninscared/2011/07/scientology_is.php



Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on July 18, 2011, 07:01:05 PM
                                  The Washington Post

                            Is Scientology a religion?
By Janet Reitman

Since 1993, Scientology, which many people have long considered to be a “cult,” has been a religion in the eyes of the United States government, with the tax exemption that goes along with that. But whether it is actually a “religion” in the way that most of us think about religion is a wholly different matter.

To address the basics: there is no God in Scientology.  There is also no prayer, no concept of Heaven or Hell, no turn-the-other-cheek forgiveness or love, nor any of the other things we typically associate with religion, at least in the Judeo-Christian context. There is also no “faith” – no concept of belief. Instead, there is knowledge, a certainty beyond a shadow of a doubt that Scientology’s doctrine, all of which was authored by the church’s founder, L. Ron Hubbard, is the absolute truth.

 I like to describe Scientology as a global spiritual enterprise – a religious corporation with a far greater emphasis on the “corporate,” profit-making side of the ledger. Since its founding in 1954, Scientology has appealed to people initially as self-help, something Americans, and many others, have been more than willing to pay for.  And as self-help, Scientology essentially promises that there are techniques one can learn – through the rigorous study and exact application of L. Ron Hubbard’s ideas– that can, for instance, help a person overcome their shyness, or empower them to end a bad marriage, or help them sell themselves more effectively in the workplace. But there is also a spiritual component to Scientology, which has to do with people realizing, through the counseling known as “auditing,” that they have lived many past lives. That’s where the religion comes in.

When I was reporting on Scientology, I was amazed by the number of ordinary people I met who truly knew – not just believed, but claimed to know – that they had lived before and would live again. That meant death was no longer scary! It also meant that we might even remember our prior lives so saying goodbye to friends and family would not really be a “goodbye.”  Even to me, a person who is agnostic about most religion, it was attractive.

That is what draws people deeply “in” to Scientology. And once in, Scientology becomes different things to different people. One woman I know compares Scientology to an onion. The outer layer, where the celebrities tend to be, is a place where people experience the church as
Oprah Winfrey shares a laugh with actor Tom Cruise during the taping of "Oprah's Surprise Spectacular" in Chicago May 17, 2011. (JOHN GRESS - REUTERS) self-help and community. For stars like Tom Cruise or John Travolta, it is the safest of communities because celebrities are catered to in Scientology in both a material way, with added perks and private counseling sessions, but also in a way that shields them from critics or intrusion into their private lives.  Wealthy Scientologists are also considered “celebrities” because they tend to donate the most money and involve themselves most in Scientology causes, all of which raises their status.

Much is made of the celebrities in Scientology, though their numbers are very few – there are maybe a dozen actual “celebrities” who belong to the church. But these people serve a promotional function, and because of it are treated like rare birds, put on pedestals by all members, including church staff who endeavor to keep their experience in Scientology positive. This leads to profound isolation from some of Scientology’s harsher truths. Celebrities certainly would not be aware of any abuse or harsh treatment of Scientology staff, which, though Scientology officials deny it, has been alleged numerous times by ex-officials over the years. While they would be obliged to obey the policy of “disconnection,” by which church members shun anyone, including their closest friends or family members, who leave Scientology on bad terms, they would also tend to believe the word of church officials far more than “apostates,” as those who have left Scientology and spoken out are called.

Screenwriter/director Paul Haggis, for instance, believed a senior Scientology official when he pledged that the Church of Scientology did not back the California anti-gay marriage bill, something the church – along with many other religious organizations – did in fact support. When Haggis discovered the truth, it propelled him to leave the church altogether. But Haggis is, so far, somewhat unique in that he did discover the truth. No Scientologist – be they celebrities or ordinary members – is supposed to read general media reports about the church. These pieces – anything critical – is considered off-limits or “entheta” in the lexicon of the Church of Scientology, and thus harmful to a member’s spiritual progress. The truth is what they know via L Ron Hubbard; media criticisms of Scientology, on the other hand, are to Scientologists, lies or “religious bigotry.” Thus they remain very much in the dark; they will not, assuredly, be reading my new book “Inside Scientology: The Story of America’s Most Secretive Religion.”

Beyond celebrities, the average middle class person, who for most of its history has formed the bulk of Scientology’s membership, has a different far different experience in Scientology. For them, the deeper they are drawn into Scientology, the more indebted to it they become.  In some cases, members have been driven into bankruptcy, forcing them to work for the church to continue to afford Scientology counseling.  Once they sign up to work for Scientology, their experience turns more punitive: they work extremely long hours, at very low pay, and are expected to adhere to a paramilitary-style discipline that is absent in any workplace I’ve ever heard of outside of the United States military. At the innermost level of this management, within the Sea Organization, which is the senior management body of the church, there is far more, if not total, ideological control over members, strict adherence to the demands of a leader who has cast himself as a sort of pope, and many other things that would define Scientology, in that context as a more traditional “cult.”

But it is only a cult to some. To others it is a community. To others it is self-help. And to others, it is absolutely religion – and in the case of young people who’ve grown up in the church it is the only religion they’ve ever known.  I think the future of Scientology, if it has one, lies in its ability to retain its identity as religion and community, and even self-help, while losing the ideological totalism that makes it cultic for many.  It is a significant challenge, and one that the church in its current incarnation may not be able to shoulder, but it is also the only way, in my opinion, that Scientology will become an enduring, and evolving, religion.

Janet Reitman is the author of the brand new book INSIDE SCIENTOLOGY: The Story of America’s Most Secretive Religion. She was a finalist for a National Magazine Award in 2007 for the Rolling Stone story “Inside Scientology,” from which this book grew, and is a contributing editor at Rolling Stone.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/guest-voices/post/is-scientology-a-religion/2011/07/17/gIQATEnSKI_blog.html

And this one in Jewish Journal
http://www.jewishjournal.com/twelve_twelve/article/scientology_secret_no_more_20110718/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on July 19, 2011, 05:12:36 PM
               Janet Reitman: Unflappable as Scientologists Question Her Motives
By Tony Ortega Mon., Jul. 18 2011

Over at the Washington Post website, Janet Reitman, author of Inside Scientology, just concluded an hour-long live question and answer session with the public.

As usual, Reitman was calm and unflappable in the face of criticism. We pointed out this weekend that Scientology's official objection to her book is specious at best: they accuse her of not talking to active Scientologists while she compiled her book, which is marketed as the first truly objective, journalistic history of the church.

As we pointed out earlier, Scientology's criticism is a dodge.

Reitman worked hard in 2005 and 2006 to get the church's perspective on things, when she was originally researching the Rolling Stone article that became the basis for her book. Since then, some of the people she interviewed have left the dwindling church -- which certainly isn't her fault.

During the Washington Post session today, Scientologists raised this criticism again, but Reitman calmly swiped such objections aside. An example:

    My wife and I have been Scientologist's most of our adult life. Our Scientology faith has helped us with our marriage (36 years and counting) as well as raising our three children. All three of our now-adult children choose to become Scientologists. While we taught them about Scientology while they were growing up, one can can only become a Scientologist by making a self-determined decision to be one -- which each of our children did. My question: Did you interview any currently active members of the Church from around the country for your book? If so, how many did you interview? My impression is that your research focused on a few disgruntled ex-members. - July 15, 2011 11:46 AM

    A. Janet Reitman : Wrong impression. I interviewed many, and one of them has a key role in the book, and indeed, she ends the book. she's a fiercely dedicated Scientologist and was raised in much the same way that it seems you raised your own family.

Reitman takes very seriously her role as a journalist who approached the subject of Scientology without preconceptions and, actually, a good deal of sympathy for the Scientologists she met along the way. The church is never going to get a more thoroughly researched and basically good-intentioned investigation of its history from a mainstream journalist. (Well, at least until Lawrence Wright's book comes out! What an embarrassment of riches for Scientology watchers this year has turned out to be.)

But that objectivity won't keep people from questioning her motives -- in fact, folks in the Tampa area will get a chance to see her in action tonight at Inkwood Books. We'd love to hear any reports from the scene! Also, look for Creative Loafing Tampa's reporter Mitch Perry to be all over it. It was questions from Perry that prompted Scientology to put out that official response to Reitman's book we wrote about Saturday.

And Perry earns extra points: recently, Scientology purchased the building that houses his newspaper, Creative Loafing Tampa. Gulp! Keep up the good work, fellow alt-weekly wretches, and let us know how David Miscavige is as a landlord!
See photo here...
http://blogs.villagevoice.com/runninscared/2011/07/janet_reitman_u.php


http://www.religiondispatches.org/books/atheologies/4885/a_peek_inside_the_onion_of_scientology/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on August 03, 2011, 05:08:15 PM
             Scientology Hits Back: 'Inside Scientology' Filled with Inaccuracies

 

By Brent Lang at TheWrap

Mon Aug 1, 2011 1:26pm EDT

The Church of Scientology says  the book “Inside Scientology” is little more than gossip-mongering and has accused author Janet Reitman of shoddy journalism.

“Ms. Reitman’s book is filled with inaccuracies,” the Church wrote in a seven-page letter to TheWrap. “It is neither scholarly nor well-researched and bears no resemblance to an ‘inside’  story.”

The church claims that Reitman, a contributing editor for Rolling Stone, never interviewed, nor requested interviews, with Scientology officials and instead relied on former parishioners who are disgruntled and members of Anonymous, the internet activist group that the church labels a cyberterrorist organization with an ax to grind against the religion.

Also read: 'Inside Scientology' Author: 'They Have the Goods on Everybody'

In a statement,  Reitman wrote, “I stand by my sources and by my reporting.”

Reitman previously told TheWrap that she spoke to numerous church higher-ups and members, and visited facilities, while she was researching the magazine article that eventually became the basis of her book.

“It’s just wrong,” Reitman told TheWrap of the allegations. “To say I didn’t contact them is so blatantly untrue. I spent a year working on the Rolling Stone article, at which point I had unprecedented access, so I saw no need to repeat that a year later. I didn’t go back and re-interview everyone.”

“All I can say is, you know, that they don’t understand how books are produced,” she added.

In an interview with TheWrap on Friday, Reitman said that rumors that Scientology exploits the personal information of famous members such as Tom Cruise may have some basis in fact.

Also read: Paul Haggis Denounces Scientology in New Yorker Opus

“They have the goods on everybody,” Reitman told TheWrap. “A great part of the Scientology experience is the confession that happens in the auditing experience [a type of counseling members receive]. You are constantly being asked to write up your transgressions, maybe even your unspoken transgressions.”

In response, the church said that it respects the confidentiality of the information that members reveal during auditing sessions and has put safeguards in place.

“Contrary to Ms. Reitman’s false assertions, the Church’s respect of the privacy of its parishioners is absolute, whether the parishioner is a celebrity or otherwise,” the church writes. “Scientology religious counseling, called auditing, is conducted within a framework of complete trust. Thus, as with ministers of other religions, the guiding ethical code requires ministers to treat communications from parishioners with total confidentiality.”

The church also claims that Reitman relied on tabloid gossip to assemble her expansive look at Scientology and asserts that the author failed to account for the religion’s “tremendous growth.”

“Parishioners and Church staff members alike have never been happier with the direction of their Church,” the church writes.

The church said the book only gets a handful of facts correct -- such as the church’s relief efforts in Haiti and New Orleans, work refurbishing old buildings, and the role that chairman David Miscavige has played in advancing Scientology creator L. Ron Hubbard’s legacy.

Presumably, Reitman also got Cruise, John Travolta and Kirstie Alley’s involvement with the church correct, too, but Scientology didn't appear ready to cede the ground on that one.
Related Articles:  'Inside Scientology' Author: 'They Have the Goods on Everybody' Paul Haggis' Break With Scientology Over Gay Rights

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/08/01/idUS246156887420110801


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on August 31, 2011, 12:26:41 PM
                                              Book Review

Secrets, scandals, and the rise of Scientology
Controversy amid quest for religious status
Tom Cruise (pictured, with church leader David Miscavige in 2004) and John Travolta are followers of Scientology, founded by L. Ron Hubbard.    Tom Cruise (pictured, with church leader David Miscavige in 2004) and John Travolta are followers of Scientology, founded by L. Ron Hubbard. (Paul White/Associated Press/File 2004)
By Glenn Altschuler
August 31, 2011

   

The “whole agonized future of this planet, every Man, Woman, and Child on it, and your own destiny for the next trillions of years,’’ L. Ron Hubbard declared, “depend on what you do here and now with and in Scientology. This is deadly serious activity.’’

   

THE CHURCH OF SCIENTOLOGY:

A History of a New Religion

By Hugh B. Urban

Princeton University, 268 pp., illustrated, $27.95

Hubbard, Scientology’s founder and a writer of science fiction, meant what he said. The Church of Scientology, an immensely successful enterprise with Tom Cruise and John Travolta among its celebrity converts, has gone to great lengths to protect its secrets. The church has been, and remains, controversial, not least over the basic question of whether it is a religion or, as its critics charge, “a swindling business and a brainwashing cult.’’

In “The Church of Scientology,’’ Hugh B. Urban, a professor of religious studies at Ohio State University, provides a fascinating account of how a healing practice called Dianetics came to define itself - and become officially recognized - as a religion in the United States. Urban strains to strike a balance between what he calls “a hermeneutics of respect and a hermeneutics of suspicion,’’ grounded in a firm belief in freedom of worship and an obligation to ask tough questions about alleged misbehavior by Scientologists, including espionage against government agencies, attacks on critics, abuse of members, and attempts to alter entries in Wikipedia.

That Scientology flourished during the Cold War, Urban argues, was not a coincidence. Hubbard’s “space opera’’ narratives, he writes, reflected a preoccupation with safety and security, mind control, UFOs, time travelers, and the threat of nuclear war. Offering Dianetics as a means to combat communist infiltration, Hubbard designed systems of surveillance to thwart enemies from within the organization and defend it from external threats.

The greatest threat, Urban reveals, in the most intriguing and important chapter of his book, came from the Internal Revenue Service. Forced to decide (despite First Amendment strictures against a government “establishment’’ of religion) what is or is not a valid church, the IRS revoked Scientology’s tax-exempt status in 1967, igniting a 26-year battle that resulted in thousands of lawsuits. At first, the IRS decreed - and the courts concurred - that despite its clerical collars and crosses, its doctrine and discipline, the Church of Scientology was not a bona fide religion because its activities had a commercial character and served the private and pecuniary interests of its members.

But in 1991, five years after Hubbard’s death, following negotiations shrouded in secrecy, the IRS reversed itself. And the State Department began to defend Scientology operations abroad. In a triumphant speech, church leader David Miscavige hailed the about-face as a “historic victory for religious freedom.’’

Despite vast financial resources, new building projects, and boasts that Scientology is the fastest-growing religion in the United States, however, Urban suggests that membership may actually be declining in the 21st century.

Either way, it matters a lot whom society delegates to settle claims regarding religious status. And so it is disappointing that Urban concludes by asking his readers to resolve that question for themselves. He asks them to decide whether the Church of Scientology is a legitimate religion, entitled to First Amendment rights applicable to civil and criminal cases, and control over (lucrative) copyrighted material. And he asks readers to determine whether American citizens require protection from religious groups (and cults) or, conversely, whether minority religious groups need greater protection from government intrusion.

When presented with these head scratchers, most readers are sure to need some help.

Glenn C. Altschuler, the Thomas and Dorothy Litwin professor of American studies at Cornell University, can be reached at gca1@cornell.edu.

http://www.boston.com/ae/books/articles/2011/08/31/the_church_of_scientology_by_hugh_b_urban_chronicles_the_controversial_rise_of_a_religion/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on September 03, 2011, 12:41:30 PM
                                New Book out.  Now


In its vetting of new members, the Church of Scientology once demanded not only the confession of misdemeanours in the current lifetime, but interrogated "the individual's subversive activities along the great time track going through myriad past lives". Among the questions asked were: "Have you ever enslaved a population?"; "Did you come to Earth for evil purposes?"; "Have you ever eaten a human body?"; "Have you ever zapped anyone?" It's easy to see why Hari Kunzru – in his Pynchonesque novel Gods Without Men – is the latest in a procession of authors to use the bizarre world of 20th-century cults as a setting for fiction. Rather more difficult is performing the kind of academic and anthropological inquiry into Scientology that Hugh Urban attempts in The Church of Scientology.

    The Church of Scientology: A History of a New Religion
    by Hugh B. Urban

    Buy it from the Guardian bookshop



   

Urban's book is self-consciously scholarly and dry, weighed down by its wealth of footnotes and repeated references to Bourdieu, Simmel and Lévi-Strauss. Maintaining such learned disdain in the face of some seriously juicy material is clearly something of a strain. Urban draws readers' attention to the fact that his work "could probably serve as the basis for a spy novel or a thriller film" or that "the history of Scientology's quest for tax-exempt status is surely worthy of a book or even a detective novel of its own". He gives the impression that, having set out to write this scrupulously recondite account, he wishes for nothing more than to redraft it as a new Da Vinci Code.

Another problem for Urban is Scientology's ruthless pursuit of its detractors. In 1976, under the codename Operation Freakout, Scientologists allegedly carried out an orchestrated attack on a critical journalist, Paulette Cooper, aimed at getting her "incarcerated in a mental institution or jail". Since then, Scientology has gone after its enemies aggressively, using its vast wealth and army of lawyers to suppress the stories of disaffected former members and investigative journalists. Urban's portrayal of the workings of the cult is insistently measured, following what he terms – in a phrase as ugly as it is clumsy – a "hermeneutics of respect and a hermeneutics of suspicion". There are repeated references to "unexplored rabbit-holes" of narrative, blocked up for fear of antagonising Scientology's paranoid information police. This nervousness means that Urban's book has a strangely neutered feel, often passing off to other authors the job of interpreting the seamier sides of the religion.

The anxiety also has a formal effect, with Urban's style, already reeking of the lecture hall, muddied by hedging and equivocation. Nothing is firmly stated; everything is "arguable", "possible", "perhaps". The book sweats from fear of litigation.

These grumblings aside, The Church of Scientology is a fascinating book. Indeed, it may be the case that the arid prose and timid approach are the price we have to pay for the deep and often brilliant anthropological dissection that Urban carries out. Where more populist authors might find it difficult, for instance, to take seriously a religion that makes its most devoted followers sign a "billion-year contract", Urban is po-faced throughout. As a result, he is granted exceptional access to Scientologists and their detractors, and builds from the often barmy material a compelling picture of the birth of a new religion. For this is the book's central thesis: that by analysing how new religions emerge and flourish, we may better understand those whose origins are lost in the haze of time.

Urban's conclusion is unappetising. Scientology's development from L Ron Hubbard's cod-psychoanalysis Dianetics in the 1950s to a bona fide religion given tax-exempt status by the IRS in the 1990s seems to have been driven almost exclusively by profit. In a 1972 policy letter circulated to senior Scientologists, Hubbard makes this explicit: "Make money… make more money… make other people produce so as to make money." The structure of the religion, with its relentless teleology and gradually revealed esoterica, appears to be designed principally as a way of extracting cash from its followers, with the cost of attaining the upper reaches of Operating Thetan status (don't ask) running into hundreds of thousands of dollars.

But to dismiss Scientology as mere spiritual snake oil is too easy. There is clearly something about Hubbard's syncretic bricolage of cold war paranoia, new age spiritualism and sci-fi pulp fiction that continues to convince its followers in ways that traditional religions cannot.

Urban persuasively suggests that it was Hubbard's talent as an author that enabled him to create a religious narrative that spoke to the age of the nuclear bomb and space exploration and Wall Street. Hubbard's novels are not in the league of his peers Philip K Dick or Robert Heinlein, but he was a major contributor to the golden age of pulp fiction, averaging between 70,000 and 100,000 words a month, and his best book – Final Blackout – is a fine example of the genre. Scientology is what happens when the novelist's role as God of his created worlds spills over into everyday life. Hubbard realised that he could control real people, particularly Hollywood actors used to assuming fictitious roles, as he controlled the characters in his books. If we buy Urban's argument, then religions are formed out of the same creative ordering of the world as literature.

Despite the infelicitous prose and a certain mildness in the face of the worst excesses of the cult, Urban's portrayal of the birth and boom of Scientology is absorbing and impressive. That he managed to write it without incurring either lawsuits or a dagger in the back is more remarkable still.

Alex Preston is the author of This Bleeding City (Faber).

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/sep/02/church-of-scientology-urban-review


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on October 04, 2011, 03:57:19 PM
                                A Queer and Pleasant Danger:

The true story of a nice Jewish boy who joins the Church of Scientology, and leaves twelve years later to become the lovely lady she is today [Hardcover]
Kate Bornstein (Author)

http://www.amazon.com/Queer-Pleasant-Danger-Jewish-Scientology/dp/0807001651/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1317646658&sr=1-1


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on October 06, 2011, 01:01:37 PM
       Book Review: The Church of Scientology: A History of a New Religion by Hugh B. Urban



Earlier this year, The New Yorker published a devastating article about Crash director Paul Haggis, and his disillusionment with the Church of Scientology.  Six months later, the Church responded with an elaborate parody, complete with videos, attempting to smear Haggis and writer Lawrence Wright for their alleged dishonesty.

This is not an organization known for taking criticism lightly.  If the Church of Scientology is famous for anything aside from Tom Cruise and John Travolta, it's for aggressively using the justice system against its many detractors. Founder L. Ron Hubbard explained his legal philosophy in 1955: “The purpose of the [lawsuit] is to harass and discourage rather than to win. The law can be used very easily to harass, and enough harassment on somebody who is simply on the thin edge anyway... will generally be sufficient to cause his professional decease. If possible, of course, ruin him utterly.”

The reclusive Hubbard died in 1986, his bloodstream full of the very pharmaceuticals denounced by his Church, but Scientology critics should still brace themselves for long, difficult, and expensive defamation actions brought by the organization. Time magazine and its parent company spent millions of dollars in legal fees defending its 1991 cover story “The Thriving Cult of Greed and Power.” Church lawyers have demanded that Google remove anti-Scientology web sites from its search results. Most notoriously, the venerable Cult Awareness Network was forced into bankruptcy after years of litigation against Scientology — and then its name was purchased by a Scientologist who started up a Hubbard-friendly “New Cult Awareness Network.”

The organization really devoted its energies to a long, brutal legal battle with the Internal Revenue Service, trying to restore its designation as a tax-exempt religious organization. In The Church of Scientology: A History of a New Religion, Ohio State University religious studies professor Hugh Urban notes that Hubbard initially made no effort to claim he had founded a religion, and in fact made several comments disparaging religious belief. Dianetics, the founding text of Scientology (which initially appeared, fittingly enough, as an article in Astounding Science Fiction magazine), was subtitled “The Modern Science of Mental Health,” and the “religion angle” (Hubbard’s words, not mine) was only approached when the IRS started sniffing around.

Suddenly, Scientology buildings were adorned with an eight-pointed cross, Scientologists were sporting clerical collars, and a book of Scientology rites was hastily produced. The U.S. government remained suspicious, however, and things only got worse after “Operation Snow White,” an elaborate intelligence-gathering operation in which Scientologists infiltrated the IRS, was uncovered in 1977.  Hubbard's wife went to jail for her part in the operation, while the messiah went into hiding.
Continued on the next page


Read more: http://blogcritics.org/books/article/book-review-the-church-of-scientology/#ixzz1ZxW6HiEN


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on October 29, 2011, 04:12:50 PM
                         The Irish Times - Saturday, October 29, 2011

Harmless or hateful?


FIRST, A CONFESSION. I once went for a job interview at the Church of Scientology. Unwittingly, I hasten to add. As a J-1 student in recession-hit San Francisco, I answered a classified ad: “Rewarding work at church available for modest pay.” The address led me to a bookstore-cum-office, and I knew this was no ordinary “church” when the application form asked, “Are you related to intelligence agencies?” and “Have you ever been involved in any sexual perversion? Give who, where, when, what, on each instance.”

The misleading nature of that advertisement is small fry in the context of Scientology’s reputation, but it is illustrative of the organisation’s modus operandi. To its critics, the church of L Ron Hubbard is a loopy spiritual pyramid scheme designed to prey on the gullible and weak-minded. It is ridiculed probably more than any other belief system, it was almost banned in Germany and it’s the target of a vitriolic campaign by anonymous techies seeking its “destruction”.

Yet bear in mind that Scientologists have started no wars and committed no atrocities – unless you count John Travolta’s big-screen adaptation of Hubbard’s science-fiction saga Battlefield Earth, which is “widely regarded as one of the worst movies ever made”, according to Hugh B Urban, a historian of religion. In fact, no one has been provably killed in the name of Scientology. The most serious charge against it arose from the death of 36-year-old Lisa McPherson in controversial circumstances at a Scientology camp at Clearwater, Florida, in 1995. The case was dropped by prosecutors five years later after a botched autopsy.

Urban, who has also written books about sexuality and the occult, is determined to give Hubbard’s disciples a fair hearing in The Church of Scientology: A History of a New Religion . Tracing how “a penny-a-word science fiction writer” founded a popular self-help therapy, Dianetics, the springboard for Scientology, Urban is resolutely straight-faced, even when discussing the church’s most fanciful teachings. The closest he comes to a chuckle is when recounting Hubbard’s claim that reaching upper states of knowledge can kill: “Yet Hubbard risked his own life and health in order to achieve the dramatic breakthrough, passing through ‘the Wall of Fire’ to uncover the secret history of our galaxy.”

The deferential approach stretches credulity at times, but it generates interesting questions about double standards in our treatment of religions. Urban highlights how many religions are hierarchical and combine elements of secrecy with a self-justifying language or narrative. Repeatedly, he makes the point that the followers of a religion should not necessarily be judged by those in positions of power. “After all, the fact that Catholic bishops have covered up child sexual abuse does not prevent millions of ordinary believers worldwide from continuing to find Catholicism meaningful in their daily lives.”

In addition, by looking at Scientology in context, Urban helps to identify just why the church antagonises people so much. For the religious, it’s so brazen in its myth-making it’s a parody of faith. For the nonreligious, it contains just the right dose of pseudoscience to resemble the homeopathy of belief systems.

What’s more, it’s so goddam American, blending the celebration of self-advancement with what Urban concludes is an ostensibly for-profit motive. Hubbard once said Scientology appealed to Americans “because they tend to believe in instant everything, from instant coffee to instant nirvana”.

Urban also sheds light on why the church is so secretive and litigious, and convincingly explains how it has evolved – and even adapted its teachings – in response to regulation by government agencies. A clampdown by the US Food and Drug Administration in 1963 led Hubbard to reposition himself as a salesman of “spiritual” rather than “healing” services. Five years later, he set up the Sea Org, a naval branch of hard-core followers, as a preliminary strike against the threat of being banned.

Crucially, Hubbard then rebranded Scientology as a religion, adopting some of the iconography of Christianity despite dismissing Jesus as “a lover of young boys and men”. This allowed the church to make a plea for special protections in the US and, most significantly, to gain tax-free status in 1993.

A number of questions go unanswered in the book, as Urban admits. He mentions as influencing factors the threat of litigation and a fear of being made “fair game” – a practice of intimidation officially denied by the church. Some readers will crave more detail about Scientology’s finances and about the bizarre Tom Cruise-Hollywood nexus.

Urban compensates for lack of colour with philosophical musings about whether, for example, a religion that depends on secrecy can survive in an internet-driven world. (A Google search will throw up Scientology’s most closely guarded revelations, saving you up to $400,000 in church fees.) Urban also points out that, contrary to popular belief, as well as to the church’s claims, Scientology is in decline. In 2008 it had an estimated 25,000 followers in the US, down from 55,000 in 2001.

Urban’s unstintingly nonjudgmental tone almost has you feeling sorry for Scientology in the end. Almost. Perhaps unintentionally, his refreshingly even-handed treatment of the controversial church puts other religions in the dock.

Joe Humphreys is an Irish Times journalist. His latest book is God’s Entrepreneurs: How Irish Missionaries Tried to Change the World (New Island)

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/weekend/2011/1029/1224306682963.html


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on January 23, 2012, 07:40:37 AM
                                           Religion, grrrr
Rachel Aviv

   BuyThe Church of Scientology: A History of a New Religion by Hugh Urban
    Princeton, 268 pp, £19.95, September 2011, ISBN 978 0 691 14608 9

You are invited to read this free book review from the London Review of Books. Register for free and enjoy 24 hours of access to the entire LRB archive of over 12,500 essays and reviews.

Empirical study led L. Ron Hubbard to the principles on which Scientology is based. He never claimed to have had a revelation. He spelled the principles out in 1950 in Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health, the bestselling self-help treatise in which he presents rationality as our birthright. The human mind, he wrote, is a perfect computer corrupted by ‘incorrect data’. He urged readers to reflect on their lives and ask themselves: ‘Where is the error?’ With the help of a lay therapist, called an ‘auditor’, they could uncover early traumas – mothers who wanted to abort them, or slept with too many men – and become less irrational: ‘Many of the things which Freud thought might exist,’ he wrote, ‘such as “life in the womb”, “birth trauma”, we in Dianetics have … confirmed.’

Hubbard insisted that the principles of Dianetics had nothing to do with ‘any mumbo-jumbo of mysticism or spiritualism or religion’. He assured readers that ‘Dianetics is a science; as such, it has no opinion about religion, for sciences are based on natural laws.’ Throughout the United States, people formed Dianetics clubs and helped each other to become ‘clear’: in this state, they would be free of all compulsions, neuroses and delusions, see colours vividly for the first time, appreciate melody, perform complex mathematical calculations and recall every moment of their lives. Hubbard was so confident of the merits of his electro-psychometer, a device used to detect hidden trauma by measuring galvanic skin response, that he asked the American Medical Association to investigate his new tool. The medical establishment showed no interest. In a review in the Nation, the kindest thing the psychiatrist Milton Sapirstein could say about Dianetics was that ‘the author seems honestly to believe what he has written.’

Hubbard took the rejection badly. When his followers were arrested for practising medicine without a licence, he complained that the United States made it ‘illegal to heal or cure anything’. He began to reconsider the distinction he’d made between psychology and spiritual practice. In a 1953 newsletter he wrote that the process of uncovering repressed memories through auditing is ‘perhaps allied with religion, perhaps a mystic practice and possibly just another form of Christian Science or plain Hubbardian nonsense’. The following year, embracing what he called the ‘religious angle’, he opened the first church of Scientology in Los Angeles. The electro-psychometer was no longer used as a diagnostic tool but became instead a ‘valid religious instrument, used in Confessionals’.

In The Church of Scientology, one of only a handful of academic treatments of the subject, Hugh Urban is less interested in the experiences of Scientologists than in the legal processes and semantic twists through which a set of beliefs becomes a religion. A professor of religious studies at Ohio State, Urban is interested in secrecy in religion, and in this book he chronicles the way Hubbard reacted to legal and political challenges to his authority by attempting (largely successfully) to conceal his theories from the public. Had he stuck with his original conception of Dianetics, his practices could have been investigated and judged according to scientific standards. A religion, on the other hand, can turn self-help platitudes into a scarce and privileged resource; criticism can be dismissed as intolerance, or persecution.

Like any therapy, Scientology appealed to people searching for a story that would explain why they hadn’t made the most of their lives. Hubbard’s disavowal of medicine required only slight adjustments. He replaced the term ‘brain’ (and tentative references to its architecture) with ‘spirit’ and ‘soul’, and expanded his concept of time. If a patient (called a ‘pre-clear’) couldn’t remember being abused, an auditor would encourage her to think about her experience in the womb; if she couldn’t recall any trauma there, she was urged to reflect on previous lives, in other galaxies, spanning hundreds or thousands of years. Through their recovered memories, pre-clears were initiated into the Scientology mythos, which hinges on the story of an intergalactic dictator called Xenu who 75 million years ago collaborated with psychiatrists to massacre a population of aliens whose tortured essences now inhabit the bodies of humans.

Scientology quickly became one of the loudest (and least articulate) voices in the anti-psychiatry movement of the 1960s – a time when doctors still had unfettered authority to administer drugs to unwilling patients. (The first international edition of the Scientology magazine, Freedom, showed horned devils performing lobotomies.) To Scientologists the ‘psychs’ were conspirators who wanted to take over the world. The new church’s survival depended on the claim – born of rejection and disappointment – that only religion is equipped to study the mind.

But Hubbard never let go of the dream that the world would become explicable through science. Since he lacked credentials, he defined his practice in the vaguest terms: ‘All we want is something with a high degree of workability, that’s all any scientist needs.’ Science was a perspective rather than a method. The proof that Scientology worked was Hubbard’s own life. In his book Mission into Time, he claimed he had finally triumphed over his unconscious; he now remembered ‘with certainty’ every moment of his existence. ‘The small details of it like what I ate for breakfast two trillion years ago are liable to go astray here and there,’ he wrote, ‘but otherwise it’s no mystery.’

Hubbard had begun exploring the redemptive possibilities of science in the 1930s and 1940s, when he was writing the voluminous short stories that appeared – he produced nearly 100,000 words a month – in Astounding Science Fiction, the most popular US magazine of its kind. His stories were crass, overdetermined and breezy; his heroes morally, mentally and physically superior to the rest of humanity. He had an exalted sense of his creative powers, but in any case held that artists were higher beings, superior to the ‘raw public’, which had been ‘booby-trapped’ into believing in a single reality.

Hubbard’s novel Typewriter in the Sky, published in 1940, tells the story of Horace Hackett, a writer who turns his best friend into a character in his own novel. Every time Hackett makes a creative decision, his friend’s reality changes: he moves helplessly through scenes, ‘swept along by a force which was wholly invisible and untouchable’. At the end of a long day’s work, Hackett muses, glass of Scotch in hand, that ‘the way you feel about stories sometimes. It’s – well, sort of divine.’ The story ‘comes bubbling out of us like music’. ‘When I go knocking out the wordage and really get interested in my characters,’ he continued, ‘it almost makes me feel like – a god or something.’

Soon Hubbard began interpreting that power literally, and many of his colleagues lost interest in his work. An extract from Dianetics was published in Astounding Science Fiction in 1950 and, according to Judith Merril, a frequent contributor, it became a ‘line of demarcation’. She saw it as marking the end of the magazine’s golden era: instead of using fantasy to pose questions that challenged social norms, it now prescribed fantastic solutions that were increasingly out of touch with the world.

Hubbard’s most devoted readers were absorbed into his fan-fiction empire; as they remembered their past lives, they became characters in his catch-all narrative. At each level of the process they attained new knowledge that enriched the fictional universe for them. The promised denouement was ascension on earth, a prospect that Hubbard regularly elaborated by writing new chapters, or ‘doctrine’. The religion would create a supremely rational species capable of all sorts of amazing feats – healing the sick, communicating with plants, levitating.

Hubbard gradually came to terms with years spent writing science fiction. It had once been a liability, not to be much discussed, but as he began to consider himself a religious leader he came to see his writing years as a productive phase of ‘research’. Thanks to science fiction, he had discovered an age when men could transcend the boundaries of the physical universe. ‘It … concerns actual incidents,’ Hubbard wrote. The only problem was that in his novels he had the timeline wrong: ‘The science fiction writer’s memory is faulty, and he gets himself all restimulated and so forth, and he doesn’t remember straight. Some of them remember it quite well, but then they reverse their time … and put it all into the future.’

Continued here...

http://www.lrb.co.uk/v34/n02/rachel-aviv/religion-grrrr


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on March 01, 2012, 09:36:23 PM
                     Messiah Or Madman? New PDF Version


I was hoping to have this ready for Ron's birthday, but it took a little longer to prepare than I anticipated.

Anyway, here it is. A nice new pdf version of Bent Corydon's "L. Ron Hubbard - Messiah Or Madman?"

Please mirror this and share it as far and wide as possible - and quickly, as these things often get deleted fast.
http://www.multiupload.com/A8NAK37T70

N.B. This is basically from the widely known text version, but I have reformatted it and made a nice cover similar to the original. It is much easier to read and distribute. I proof-read and corrected bad OCR as best as I could. If anyone finds any glaring errors, please report back to this thread and I will collect them up and periodically do fixes. The photographic plates mentioned in the text are not included, so if anyone has access to these please share !

In reading thru this book again, I am impressed by how thorough it is and it really explains things very well - including the current management practices. Things really have NOT changed since Ron's days. I highly recommend that everyone reads this again.

Best,

The Real No User.

http://ocmb.xenu.net/ocmb/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=34580

Happy Birthday Ron ! . . . . I'm glad you're dead.


Here's the direct download choices pulled out of that multiupload link...
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=6J85LWHJ
https://rapidshare.com/#!download|553tl3|453069135|LRHMOM.zip|805  (Copy and paste )
http://depositfiles.com/en/files/86ebobpq5
http://hotfile.com/dl/110669535/77e4bf3/LRHMOM.zip.html
http://www.zshare.net/download/87909186203e925c/
(I didn't post the uploading.com one due to same fake download banner ad buttons).

-----------------------------------------------------------

Here's another mirror download (directly at megaupload.com) of the just PDF (not in a zipped mac folder)

File name: L. Ron Hubbard - Messiah Or Madman.pdf
File description: "L. Ron Hubbard - Messiah Or Madman" by Bent Corydon (PDF book)
File size: 895.79 KB
Download link: http://www.megaupload.com/?d=SNETNONE

The file is small enough to email to your friends, even on dial-up internet.



Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on April 20, 2012, 01:11:09 PM
                                 Transgender, Scientologist, “Cult Hero”

Why America’s Most Radical Transgender Activist Spent Twelve Years in Scientology, and What It Teaches About the Rest of Us

 A book review.  Sorry scientology. Yet another person comes out of the woodwork to tell the world what you really did for them.

By Jay Michaelson

http://www.religiondispatches.org/books/sexandgender/5899/transgender,_scientologist,_%E2%80%9Ccult_hero%E2%80%9D/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on May 06, 2012, 03:25:43 PM
                   Sunday, May 6, 2012 07:00 AM NZST


                                  My Scientology excommunication

I was one of the world's top 50 church members -- then one mistake changed my life

By Kate Bornstein

http://www.salon.com/2012/05/05/my_scientology_excommunication/singleton/

               Kate Bornstein, Transgender Writer And Activist, Discusses Life In And Exit From The Church Of Scientology

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/05/kate-bornstein-transgender-scientology_n_1483590.html


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on May 30, 2012, 09:48:29 AM
                                How I Helped L. Ron Hubbard to ‘Take Over the Planet’


Back when queer activist Kate Bornstein was a boy named Al, she was a leading member of the Church of Scientology. She served aboard L. Ron Hubbard's flagship, and even worked directly with Hubbard on a campaign to control Scientology members more completely. Bornstein's new memoir A Queer and Pleasent Danger explains why she found Scientology so appealing, and what she brought to it. Here's an exclusive excerpt about Bornstein's work with Hubbard.

This excerpt has been edited for length here and there — the full version is much longer and contains some hilarious passages where Bornstein meets with Hubbard, including much more about their dynamic...

http://io9.com/5913972/how-i-helped-l-ron-hubbard-to-take-over-the-planet


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on June 18, 2012, 07:44:57 PM
                    Interview
    June 13, 2012

No Longer At Sea: Kate Bornstein Talks Scientology

    A Queer and Pleasant Danger
    by Kate Bornstein
    Beacon Press , 2012

Kate Bornstein is a trans activist and writer who first gained notoriety with the 1995 release of Gender Outlaw: On Men, Women and the Rest of Us. Now a staple in college courses, that book remains controversial for questioning the male and female gender binary.

Always forthcoming, Bornstein has nonetheless avoided writing, until now, about one period of her life: the twelve years she spent as a staff member in the Church of Scientology. Recently, I caught up with Bornstein to discuss her new memoir, A Queer and Pleasant Danger.

You say you wrote this book for your daughter—what do you mean by that?

............    http://www.religiondispatches.org/books/atheologies/5988/no_longer_at_sea%3A_kate_bornstein_talks_scientology/

Jun 15 2012
Former Scientologist and Gender Activist Shares Her Life Story in a New Memoir, A Queer and Pleasant Danger


http://uprisingradio.org/home/2012/06/15/former-scientologist-and-gender-activist-shares-her-life-story-in-a-new-memoir-a-queer-and-pleasant-danger/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on June 22, 2012, 05:07:16 PM
                                Remedy of Black Dianetics – Coming Soon

             Marty Rathbun`s book coming soon.
Here is the cover...


http://markrathbun.wordpress.com/2012/06/21/remedy-of-black-dianetics-coming-soon/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on June 24, 2012, 02:25:46 PM
                                          The Book Is Now Available


Posted on June 23, 2012 by martyrathbun09 | 64 Comments

Order your copy at Amazon Books here: What Is Wrong With Scientology?
http://www.amazon.com/What-Wrong-With-Scientology-Understanding/dp/1477453466/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1340487137&sr=8-2&keywords=mark+%22marty%22+rathbun

Excerpt from Chapter Seven – Confessional:


 In this wise, a new moral code is imposed upon individuals, covertly and against their own determinisms.  It is exacerbated by repeated questioning about the individual’s failure to report on other Scientologists.  After a while, a corporate Scientologist modifies her behavior accordingly, in order to avoid more security checks.  She not only edits her own behavior and thoughts, she attempts to do the same with Scientologist friends and family members, so that she does not get into trouble for overlooking such transgressions of others.  Thus, a process that was originally intended to free a person from the self-imposed mental prison she has created by her own inability to live up to what she considers right and ethical conduct becomes reversed.  The preclear is instead forced to agree to a new mental prison, imposed by the organization based on what it decrees to be right or wrong.  In short, the process replaces a person’s native judgment with a new judgment of its own.  In practice, it is a dark and painful operation, making a person less self-determined and more other-determined.

    It seems that the only solution open to corporate Scientologists to cope and carry on within their culture is to become moralists.  Moralists who enforce on self and others morals which have been implanted.  If corporate Scientologists police their own conduct fastidiously enough, and interfere enough with the behavior and conduct of their fellows, they reckon they might be spared the cost, embarrassment and pain of being ordered to further batteries of security checks. In fact, that is the only behavior that does avoid continual, expensive, and degrading security checks in corporate Scientology.

    This is yet another example of Scientology Inc.’s  reversal of end product.  Confessional technology was developed with the purpose to help an individual recognize she is the cause of her own destiny – and it has a long history of realizing that purpose.  This priceless technology has been twisted and corrupted to the point where now the individual winds up with her destiny blueprinted and dictated by the church.

    These blueprints are enforced through a related – and now similarly corrupted – technology of Scientology: the technology of ethics.


Order your copy from Amazon Books at, What Is Wrong With Scientology?
http://www.amazon.com/What-Wrong-With-Scientology-Understanding/dp/1477453466/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1340487137&sr=8-2&keywords=mark+%22marty%22+rathbun

http://markrathbun.wordpress.com/2012/06/23/the-book-is-now-available/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on June 27, 2012, 03:53:51 PM
                                Kindle Edition Available of What Is Wrong With Scientology


Posted on June 25, 2012 by martyrathbun09 | 99 Comments

The Kindle edition is now available at Amazon Books, at What Is Wrong With Scientology? Kindle Edition.  The whole introduction and part of Chapter One is available at this link.

Definition of: Kindle

A portable e-book reader from Amazon.com that includes free wireless downloads using Sprint's 3G cellular service. It also provides basic Web access along with music storage and playback. The Kindle features a 6" screen, except for the DX model, which has an iPad-sized 10" display.

Introduced in late 2007 with 88,000 titles in a modified Mobipocket format, more than a hundred best sellers were offered. Book selection continually increases as models become thinner, lighter and faster. In 2010, the third-generation Kindle offered optional Wi-Fi.

The Kindle uses a monochrome display that enables the battery to last up to a month (see E Ink). For a fee, newspapers such as The New York Times and Wall Street Journal are downloaded during the night for morning reading. Users' personal documents can be e-mailed to Amazon and downloaded to the Kindle or transferred via USB.

Kindle Books for Other Devices
In 2009, Amazon introduced the Kindle app for the PC, Mac, iPhone and iPod touch, allowing customers to read their Kindle books on other devices at no extra cost. In addition, automatic bookmarks let readers pick up in one format where they stopped in the other. In 2010, the company announced a Kindle app for the iPad and other tablet computers. See Kindle Fire and Mobipocket.


In the meantime, Haydn James happened to stop by the other day and I gave him my proof copy which he finished and sent me his feedback on.  He agreed to sharing it with you.

Haydn James’ Review of What is Wrong With Scientology?

Finished reading your book. As an experienced Scientologist, I
wondered: what will I get out of reading it? The answer? A great
deal, a very great deal.

For me it answered a number of unanswered questions, but most of
all (and having finished reading the book I know you will love
this) it confirmed for me that my current spiritual journey and
purpose to help others is as it should be. Not because you, Hubbard
or anyone else told me so or because my views happen to coincide
with yours but because I know it to be true for myself. And that is
incredibly liberating.

I told you when I visited you and Mosey that I have never been
happier. That wasn’t quite true, I am all the happier for having
read your book.

I would have finished reading it sooner but I made the mistake of
putting it down to grab some food, at which point Lucy picked it
up, started reading and wouldn’t give it back. She loved it and
thought it brilliant!

Since I have now read the proof you kindly provided, I thought it
only fair that I also buy it, which I have done and posted a
review. I describe it as “A unique book on Scientology”. And it is.
But I also believe you are the Tom Paine of Scientology. I believe
this book will be to the subject of Scientology and Scientologists
what Common Sense was to the American people and their ultimate
freedom. Just as Tom Paine discussed and destroyed the validity of
willingly giving up ones freedom to an uncontrollable entity known as
“royalty”, you discuss and destroy any notion that one should
become a slave to a subject and organization designed to free
people. Like Paine’s tract “Common Sense”, the truth in your book
is unmistakable and unavoidable.

In a word … brilliant.

Haydn


Print Edition is still available at, What Is Wrong With Scientology? Print Edition
http://www.amazon.com/What-Wrong-With-Scientology-Understanding/dp/1477453466/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1340680338&sr=1-1&keywords=what%20is%20wrong%20with%20scientology&tag=vglnk-c498-20

http://markrathbun.wordpress.com/2012/06/25/kindle-edition-available-of-what-is-wrong-with-scientology/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on July 02, 2012, 08:56:20 AM
                     Rathbun's book - REVIEWS!

Originally Posted by Dulloldfart
Here you go. I'll even not indent or colour it for you.

Note that this review is now posted in the top spot for critical reviews at Amazon.com:
http://www.amazon.com/product-review...reative=380553

Paul

-----

From this post:

If this book is aimed at the public at large who have as yet not gotten involved with scientology and it is trying to convince them that scientology is good, I believe it will not be effective.

It is literately riddled with scientology jargon and references and unfounded statements of fact about scientology and Hubbard that I believe will not interest this public on any scale.

However, I believe this book is going to have great appeal to scientologists who have left organized scientology, fleeing its abuses but are still true believers in Hubbard. And why not? Marty rightly points out many horrid abuses within the organized scientology and purports to offer a kinder and gentler scientology where people are not beaten, screamed at, hard sold beyond ability to bear and the like. Who would not like that?

I liked that the book told of some horrid abuses in organized scientology. There are many horrid abuses within organized scientology that go far beyond the examples given by Marty.

I also really liked reading that Marty to a degree seems to promote a non-fundamentalist approach to scientology, saying people should be able to leave it, take breaks from it, not have to believe everything Hubbard says, etc. I think that is a good start.

I especially liked reading the last chapter or two of the book and really, really wanted to believe that Marty reaches out to and seems to embrace good parts of other practices that foster human rights and decency. I like that he seemed to be preaching that scientologists should not think they have this superior technology and be arrogant as if they were somehow above all others, when they certainly are not.

I really, really wanted to like Marty especially as I believe that he is being honest about what he has written in this book being his actual beliefs. I also am a big believer of freedom of speech and expression and that most certainly includes Marty and those who believe in scientology like Marty does. I also knew Marty before he went directly under Miscavige and abused others and I knew him then not to be an abusive person.

However, the parts that I did not like about this book outweigh in importance what I liked.

Marty makes countless references to Hubbard's "technology" and "research" and speaks of all that as if it is somehow true. Hubbard had absolutely no qualifications in the field of mental health and in fact falsified his credentials many times.

Of the countless "levels" and "auditing processes" Hubbard supposedly researched, none to my knowledge were ever peer reviewed nor subjected to any scientific analysis. People have died following Hubbard policies, committed suicide and otherwise were harmed in many cases yet Marty does not discuss that and instead seems to sweep it aside.

Hubbard constantly made these sweeping statements proclaiming the brilliance of his "discoveries" and then demanded that people pay large sums for them without ever proving that his discoveries were valid. For example, Hubbard released the highly dangerous "Introspection Rundown" proclaiming it was one of the great discoveries of the 20th century and saying that the last need for psychiatry was now gone.

Yet he had no qualifications whatsoever to make such proclamations and what he released was a highly dangerous "rundown", in effect practicing medicine/psychology without a license but being protected under the cloak of religion.

In this book Marty will often compare scientology to other practices in an effort to make it somehow seem normal or harmless. For example he says that Hubbard’s dictates about removing undesirables from society and taking away their civil rights is much like the view of the mental health community now. I disagree. Marty does not list the types of people Hubbard felt should be removed from society and have civil rights taken away. For example Hubbard felt that applied to people who were gay. That is not the view of the mental health field. Nor does the mental health field say that these people should be disposed of quietly and without sorrow like Hubbard says.

And, in my opinion Marty does the readers a disservice by discounting the abuses of Hubbard himself. Marty tends to justify Hubbard’s crazy policies to destroy others and the like as having come from a time when organized scientology was fighting for its life from huge enemies.

But who are these imagined “enemies” if not individuals or government departments trying to help people who themselves were harmed by the standard practice of Hubbard’s scientology.

Marty, for example, talks of a decade and a half of the “unfettered” guardians office’s operations that had come back to haunt Hubbard. The guardians office was not unfettered, that was a line put out by Miscavige and bought by many. In actual fact the guardians office was run by Hubbard himself.

The crimes the guardians office committed were pursuant to Hubbard’s own programs and orders. Or they were to clean up messes caused by people harmed by the standard practice of scientology as written by Hubbard.

When the FBI conducted a massive raid on scientology offices in the USA in 1977, immediate actions were taken by their guardian office bosses in the UK to remove evidence of Hubbard running the guardians office from their files. It took well over 100 people weeks to get that evidence out of the files, there was so much of it.

Much of the real cruelty within organized scientology was in fact carried out either by Hubbard himself or ordered by or condoned by Hubbard. Hubbard was known to demand heads on pikes and the brutal treatment of many who supported him for the crazy crimes and the like that Hubbard in his madness imagined they committed.

It was Hubbard who wrote the horrid policies of disconnection, rehabilitation colonies and so many other things abusive in nature. Hubbard in his madness imagined many enemies of scientology such as the world bank, basically all of the mental health field, the Rockefellers and so many more that could have cared less about organized scientology.

And all the while Hubbard was getting millions of dollars of scientology money, much through threats and abuse, while lying to the greater scientology community that he never took any money from scientology.

I could be wrong but I believe that Marty does believe what he wrote and I believe that Marty really wants a better world. But in my humble opinion, he himself is doing some of the very people he wishes to help a great disservice with this book by trying to imply that parts of scientology are less dangerous than they really are or that somehow Hubbard was not the abusive madman that countless people have testified him to be.

I think that the real good or bad in scientology lies in the heart of the scientologist and how and why she uses it. I agree with Marty that you can’t kill an idea and that people have a right to believe in what they want. But, again, I feel this book can mislead people into believing scientology is more than it is and that Hubbard was more qualified or a better person than he was.

Anyway this all is my opinion. I actually wish all the scientologists great healing and recovery. And this includes the author.

[Denise Brennan]

http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?27476-Rathbun-s-book-REVIEWS!/page20


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on July 02, 2012, 07:23:25 PM

                      Sunday, 1 July 2012
                                                               Atack Reloaded

After years of silence Jon Atack, who literally wrote the book on Scientology, made a brief but effective television appearance in May – and the good news is, he is working on a new book.

Jon Atack, whose book A Piece of Blue Sky remains the definitive work on Hubbard-era Scientology, made a fleeting appearance on British television in May.1

Atack's television appearance does not signal a return to the front-line against Scientology: it is more of a one-off gig.

But the good news is, he is working on another book – of which more below....

http://infinitecomplacency.blogspot.com/2012/07/atack-reloaded.html


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on July 31, 2012, 11:37:56 PM
                                                Frank memoir a wild ride

In Kate Bornstein's new memoir, "A Queer and Pleasant Danger," the transgender writer and speaker admits it's not readers she's really speaking to.

She's directing the story of her life—from the years spent currying L. Ron Hubbard's favor as a Scientologist to the time she served as a BDSM "slave" to two women in Seattle—to her own daughter.

That child, Jessica, is now grown, with kids of her own. According to Bornstein, Jessica remains in the upper echelons of Scientology and wouldn't be able to contact ousted relatives like her. So she speaks to her long-estranged daughter through her memoir, released earlier this summer.

   

With Scientology in the headlines following the break-up of Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes, it's fascinating to read chapters about the nascent movement, back in a time when Scientologists like Bornstein would have never considered it a religion. Bornstein, back when she was "Al Bornstein," met Hubbard and moved up rapidly through the ranks, eventually hitting a bizarre and 007-like snag in her Scientology career.

After leaving Scientology, Bornstein decided it was time to fully devote herself to getting gender reassignment surgery and began living as a woman full-time. Soon, she was in the bondage and domination scene, and she's frank—sometimes to the point of creeping you out—with the details of what a night spent in BDSM "play" can be like.

Eventually, Bornstein evolves into her current incarnation as a gender theorist, writer and performer. It's an unbelievable ride (or at least it would be if it were a story told by someone else).

The experience of peeking into Bornstein's mind can be at times thrilling, voyeuristic and confusing. But the storytelling never stops being entertaining.

The book will delight Bornstein's fans with new material and introduce the uninitiated to a truly unique spirit. Either way, it will be fun, funny and never mean.

http://www.redeyechicago.com/news/local/ct-red-kate-bornstein-book-review-20120731,0,7121697.story


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on August 24, 2012, 08:07:21 AM
                                             Scientology

Scientology Book Bonanza! Jeff Hawkins Delivers, and More Reasons for Librarians to Hide

By Tony Ortega Sun., Jun. 10 2012

http://blogs.villagevoice.com/runninscared/2012/06/scientology_jefferson_hawkins_book.php


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on October 24, 2012, 06:27:39 PM
                         Red Pill Diary - new book coming out on Scientology and Nation of Islam

http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?28993-Red-Pill-Diary-new-book-coming-out-on-Scientology-and-Nation-of-Islam


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on November 05, 2012, 06:54:25 AM
                                        Lawrence Wright's new book January release date

                                              (The guy from The NEW Yorker.)

    You heard it here first, of course.
    This is not BPI by Random House as yet, AFAIK.

    Two possible book titles so far but looks like a
    January release date for the hardback and ebook:

    Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood
    And The Prison Of Belief
    by Lawrence Wright

    ISBN: 9780593069226
    Format: Hardback
    Publication Date: 2013-01-17
    Publisher: BANTAM PRESS
    Pages: 400

    Prisoners of Faith
    by Lawrence Wright

    EBook ISBN: 9781446488577
    Published: 17/01/2013
    Imprint: Transworld Digital
    Extent: 400 pages

    An explosive exposé of the cult of Scientology revealed through the eyes of a high profile former member.

    Synopsis

    When Academy Award winning writer and director Paul Haggis (Million Dollar Baby, Crash) left the Church of Scientology after three decades of loyal service, the organisation suffered a crushing blow. Alongside Tom Cruise and John Travolta, Haggis was one of the church’s Hollywood trophies. But Haggis’ personal investigation of the church to which he had pledged his faith uncovered a litany of horrors, including physical abuse, forced abortions, slavery and imprisonment of its members. With his belief shattered, Haggis resigned from Scientology and here – for the first time – he speaks out about his experiences.

    Prisoners of Faith explores the roots of Scientology, from the life of its eccentric founder, L. Ron Hubbard, to the practices of its current leader David Miscavige. Encompassing flashes of brilliance and insanity, we discover the appeal of Scientology through Haggis’ eyes, especially to talented and ambitious members of the entertainment industry. This is the most profound reckoning to date with the powerful and secretive organisation that dominates celebrity headlines. It is also a moving human story of the lure of extreme faith and the price of leaving it.

    ###

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Going-Clear-Scientology-Hollywood-Prison/dp/0593069226/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1352049626&sr=1-4

    More info as I get it.

http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?29209-Lawrence-Wright-s-new-book-January-release-date


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on November 06, 2012, 11:19:10 PM

                            worldcat.org

https://www.worldcat.org/profiles/Wieber/lists/1768991

3 books out in early 2013.

1) Lawrence Wright "Prisoners of Faith" as covered above.

2) Jenna Miscavige, niece of David Miscavige tell all book comes out in January ! 2months away!

3) Marc Headley "The Greatest Good"
Despicable Church vengefulness and retaliation since he left the Sea Organization will be an eye-opener.
What length the Church will go to against a former member that dares to whistleblow ?
This is what the extorted funds out of the public pays for !


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on November 10, 2012, 06:11:26 AM
New Memoir on Scientology

    Hello,
    I apologize in advance if this is an inappropriate place to post this (but it is General Discussion ...), my Scientology book is now for sale on amazon (and the other usual etailers).
    Here's a link to my blog, which will click you through to amazon (I think I get a referral credit that way or something ... not sure).  http://www.vancewoodward.com/journal/2012/11/9/addicted-to-scientology-overcoming-the-ups-downs-of-scientoloholism
    Here's what the cover looks like:

http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?29261-New-Memoir-on-Scientology


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on November 14, 2012, 07:02:15 AM
                           
                Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief [Deckle Edge] [Hardcover]
Lawrence Wright (Author)

Book Description
Release Date: January 17, 2013
A clear-sighted revelation, a deep penetration into the world of Scientology by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of the The Looming Tower, the now-classic study of al-Qaeda’s 9/11 attack. Based on more than two hundred personal interviews with both current and former Scientologists—both famous and less well known—and years of archival research, Lawrence Wright uses his extraordinary investigative ability to uncover for us the inner workings of the Church of Scientology.

At the book’s center, two men whom Wright brings vividly to life, showing how they have made Scientology what it is today: The darkly brilliant science-fiction writer L. Ron Hubbard, whose restless, expansive mind invented a new religion. And his successor, David Miscavige—tough and driven, with the unenviable task of preserving the church after the death of Hubbard.

We learn about Scientology’s complicated cosmology and special language. We see the ways in which the church pursues celebrities, such as Tom Cruise and John Travolta, and how such stars are used to advance the church’s goals. And we meet the young idealists who have joined the Sea Org, the church’s clergy, signing up with a billion-year contract.

In Going Clear, Wright examines what fundamentally makes a religion a religion, and whether Scientology is, in fact, deserving of this constitutional protection. Employing all his exceptional journalistic skills of observation, understanding, and shaping a story into a compelling narrative, Lawrence Wright has given us an evenhanded yet keenly incisive book that reveals the very essence of what makes Scientology the institution it is.

http://www.amazon.com/Going-Clear-Scientology-Hollywood-Prison/dp/0307700666/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1352826170&sr=8-2&keywords=lawrence+wright+scientology


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on November 15, 2012, 02:59:51 PM
                                 Knopf to Publish Pulitzer Prize Winner’s Investigation of Scientology
 
By LESLIE KAUFMAN
Lawrence Wright's next book will be Kenny Braun/Knopf, via Associated Press Lawrence Wright’s next book will be “Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood and the Prison of Belief.”

Lawrence Wright, who won the Pulitzer Prize for general nonfiction in 2007 for his last book, “The Looming Tower: Al Qaeda and the Road to 9/11,” has written an investigation of the Church of Scientology, the Alfred A. Knopf publishing house announced Wednesday.

The book, which is titled “Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood and the Prison of Belief,” will be released in January. Knopf, which is part of Random House, says it has set a first printing for the book of 150,000 copies.

The book stems from an investigation into Scientology that Mr. Wright wrote for The New Yorker, where he is a staff writer. Knopf says the book is based on three years of research. As part of that research, Mr. Wright conducted more than 200 interviews with current and former members of the secretive religion, among others.

Mr. Wright said in a written statement: “I was drawn to write this book by the questions many people have about Scientology: What is it that makes this religion alluring? What do its adherents get out of it? How can rational-seeming people subscribe to beliefs that others find incomprehensible?”

    http://mediadecoder.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/11/14/knopf-to-publish-pulitzer-prize-winners-investigation-of-scientology/

                     Scientology Tell-All On Tom Cruise & John Travolta To Be Released In January

http://www.radaronline.com/exclusives/2012/11/scientology-tell-all-tom-cruise-john-travolta-release-january

                              http://www.grandforksherald.com/event/article/id/249657/group/homepage/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on November 26, 2012, 07:00:04 AM
                     New book - “Scientology: A Walk into Darkness,” by Glenn Samuels

Former Apollo auditor and researcher Glenn Samuels’ book “Scientology: A Walk into Darkness” should be out within days or weeks. Might be the most revealing book of the bunch in some respects since Glenn worked hand in glove with LRH on tech lines for a number of years.

http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?29391-New-book-%E2%80%9CScientology-A-Walk-into-Darkness-%E2%80%9D-by-Glenn-Samuels


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on November 26, 2012, 05:57:34 PM
                Jim Lewis new paper. 2012 Scientology Up Stat, Down Stat

http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?29395-Jim-Lewis-new-paper.-2012-Scientology-Up-Stat-Down-Stat


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on December 18, 2012, 05:55:10 AM
                                   Publishers put Scientology under the spotlight

                                          THE BOOKSELLER

17.12.12 | Joshua Farrington   

 Scientology is a hot topic at the moment, with Paul Thomas Anderson's film "The Master" partly inspired by the impact of the movement's founder, science-fiction author L Ron Hubbard.

The controversial organisation will be subjected to further scrutiny in the new year with new books examining how the Church of Scientology operates.

On 7th January, Silvertail Books will release The Church of Fear: Inside the Weird World of Scientology, by journalist John Sweeney. The "Panorama" reporter made two programmes on the church, famously clashing with a Scientology spokesman in a scene that went viral online.

Silvertail publisher Humfrey Hunter said: "These kinds of books have never really been done before, so it's a really interesting time for Scientology. It's a long process. I think the reason they are starting to appear now is that more and more people have been able to leave over the years, and are finally able to talk about what they experienced."

He added: "The internet has made it easier for people who went through the same things to come together and talk about it. There's been this creeping growth, and now it has reached a tipping point." The book will be released as a paperback at £12.99, and around the world in all English language territories, including the US, as an e-book costing £3.99.

A first-hand account of life in the church is released by William Morrow on 12th February priced at £11.99. Jenna Miscavige Hill, the niece of the current church leader David Miscavige, is a former Scientologist who tells her story in Beyond Belief: My Secret Life Inside Scientology and My Harrowing Escape.

Hill is an outspoken critic of the church, made famous by celebrity practitioners including Tom Cruise and John Travolta.

http://www.thebookseller.com/news/publishers-put-scientology-under-spotlight.html


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on December 27, 2012, 04:53:48 PM
                            Lawrence Wright's new book January release date

Trust me that I've already read everything out there . . . everything.

Today though, I've been previewing Wright's book the past hour or two.
My jaw has dropped a few times. All I keeping blurting out on
and off is "holy sh*t!"

Franks and Miscavige wearing "wires" to attempt to frame Mary Sue
for all the crimes and leave LRH in the clear to live out his remaining years.
The last couple days at Creston and the final will. The "death assist"
with Ray Mithoff. Lawrence Wright concludes that passage:

"Whatever powers Scientology was supposed to bestow were
no more evident in the death of its founder than they had
been in his life."

All the palace intrigues after his death. Haunting stories. Who would
have thought all of this this would have made it into a major mainstream
book by a Pulitzer Prize winning author?

Me, for one.

DM, Tommy Davis, Tom Cruise, just to name a few, will not like this book.
Many Tommy Davis behind-the-scenes foot bullets are memorialized forever,
following him to Austin as he begins his new life.

The Marty-Diane Colletto incident in stark vivid detail. DM violence at Saint Hill
and beating up his PC. DM steroid use for asthma . . . "roid rage" anyone? The
list goes on and on. Wright managed to get some extraordinarily revealing
interviews along the way

The book is riveting on every page. The whole history with no pulled punches
and so well written. Brought to life and clarity by a really good author. And to
know that all the material was undoubtedly vetted beyond question by the
author, his two research assistants, and the publishing house lawyers.

Can't wait for the physical book to release. I know what I'll be doing that day.

http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?29209-Lawrence-Wright-s-new-book-January-release-date/page3


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on December 30, 2012, 07:12:30 AM
So how does 2013 look? If January is any guide, it’s going to be rough.

January 7 — John Sweeney’s book The Church of Fear: Inside the Weird World of Scientology hits bookstores.

January 16 — A TV documentary is debuting that we are not allowed to speak of just yet.

January 17 — Lawrence Wright’s book Going Clear will ride in on a big wave of publicity.

January 17 — Jenna Miscavige Hill’s memoir will give Wright’s book a run for its money as the media feeding frenzy peaks.

January 17 — We predict that Marc Headley will not be making that announcement that so many of you think is happening. So calm down.

(Who are the biological parents of Cruise`s kid.)


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on December 31, 2012, 06:56:49 PM
   
The creepy desert road where Tom Cruise’s potty Church pals carved giant ‘hello’ to E.T.
BBC reporter John Sweeney visits cult's alien cathedral


                          THE SUN

Read more: http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/features/4719205/scientology-tom-cruise-alien-cathedral-new-mexico-hello-message.html#ixzz2GbtNfhUX


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on January 01, 2013, 06:56:28 AM
                       John Sweeney getting plenty of publicity for his upcoming book.

: Church of Scientology's 'alien space cathedral' in New Mexico desert: report Revealed

A BBC reporter traveled to a secluded section of the New Mexico desert to investigate the site, reportedly inscribed with a message to aliens that can be seen from space.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/scientology-alien-space-cathedral-article-1.1230159#ixzz2GenTcNHh

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2255215/Revealed--alien-space-cathedral-built-New-Mexico-desert-Tom-Cruise-s-Scientology-church.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490

http://www.newkerala.com/news/newsplus/worldnews-121454.html#.UOHe9nfF1m0

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2012/12/31/scientologys-alien-space-cathedral-john-sweeneys-church-fear_n_2388291.html?ncid%3DGEP

http://www.newstrackindia.com/newsdetails/2012/12/31/107-Scientology-church-has-carved-hello-to-aliens-at-New-Mexico-base-.html

http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/features/4719205/scientology-tom-cruise-alien-cathedral-new-mexico-hello-message.html?OTC-RSS&ATTR=Features

http://www.isciencetimes.com/articles/4279/20121231/alien-space-cathedral-new-mexico-actually-scientology.htm

http://www.clevelandleader.com/node/19718

http://www.radaronline.com/exclusives/2012/12/scientology-underground-desert-alien-crop-circles


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on January 01, 2013, 05:45:12 PM
     Go  John Sweeney

               Cruise cult’s bizarre musical chairs game    THE SUN

 SCIENTOLOGISTS were forced to play a sinister game of musical chairs to decide who should be in the cult’s inner circle, a new book reveals.

David Miscavige
Chief ... David Miscavige
Polaris

Church members danced frantically to Queen’s Bohemian Rhapsody until 4am. The mad ritual in a “punishment cell” dubbed The Hole climaxed in violent scenes, says John Sweeney in his book The Church of Fear.

Ex-sect member Tom DeVocht told the BBC Panorama investigator that competitors faced rejection by leader David Miscavige — a pal of Scientologist superstar Tom Cruise — if they lost a chair place.

DeVocht, a builder, said: “Everybody played the game with this mental anguish. People were breaking down. It was a very eerie, strange thing.”

A chair was smashed in two as a winner was decided in the cell — built from two trailer homes at the sect’s California HQ, Gold Base, at Gilman Hot Springs.

DeVocht claims he was a long-time friend of Miscavige, 52, until he left the weird sect in 2005. He said Miscavige — Cruise’s best man at his 2006 wedding to Katie Holmes — hit him twice.

The Church and Miscavige deny all claims of abuse and violence. They say Sweeney, who erupted in fury at a Scientology member in a BBC programme in 2007, is psychotic, a liar and a bigot.

The Church of Fear — Inside the Weird World of Scientology by John Sweeney, published on January 7 by Silvertail Books. Paperback £12.99 and ebook £3.99 www.silvertailbooks.com

Read more: http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/4720743/Tom-Cruise-cults-bizarre-game-of-musical-chairs.html#ixzz2GhSElhT7

http://in.omg.yahoo.com/news/scientologists-played-sinister-game-musical-chairs-says-tell-121520666.html

http://frenchtribune.com/teneur/1315222-scientologists-play-musical-chairs-game


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on January 02, 2013, 04:48:28 PM
                        New Book Reveals Scientology’s “Alien Space Cathedral” in New Mexico

                                                JDJOURNAL

http://www.jdjournal.com/2013/01/01/new-book-reveals-scientologys-alien-space-cathedral-in-new-mexico/

                         Church Of Scientology Allegedly Running ‘Alien Space Cathedral’


                                                     The Inquisitr

http://www.inquisitr.com/463988/church-of-scientology-allegedly-running-alien-space-cathedral/


                                       Scientologists build underground 'space alien cathedral'

                                                     The West Australian

http://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/a/-/world/15743302/scientologists-build-underground-space-cathedral/




Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on January 03, 2013, 06:38:05 AM
Alien Space Cathedral Ran by Church of Scientology Discovered in New Mexico

                         Christian Post

Read more at http://global.christianpost.com/news/alien-space-cathedral-ran-by-church-of-scientology-discovered-in-new-mexico-87566/#QZJ70IoHGXv21XH2.99

                          Scientologists' Alleged 'Alien Space Cathedral' Found

                                          Yahoo news canada

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/scientologists-alleged-alien-space-cathedral-found-155041266.html




Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on January 03, 2013, 12:01:37 PM
                           A Careful Writer Stalks the Truth About Scientology

By CHARLES McGRATH
Published: January 2, 2013
                                                     The New York Times.
 

AUSTIN, Tex. — The writer Lawrence Wright doesn’t seem at all the sort of person you’d find in public wearing a black cowboy shirt emblazoned with big white buffalos. He’s shy, soft-spoken, a little professorial. But as if he didn’t have enough to do, besides working on three plays simultaneously and getting ready to publish a new book in two weeks, Mr. Wright has been taking piano lessons with Floyd Domino,...

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/03/books/scientology-fascinates-the-author-lawrence-wright.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on January 04, 2013, 06:30:33 AM
                                      Transworld cancels Scientology title

03.01.13 | Charlotte Williams

 Transworld has decided to pull a book promising to expose the inner workings of the controversial world of Scientology from its schedules.

Going Clear by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Lawrence Wright was slated for release on 17th January, but has now been taken off the schedules. Publicity director Patsy Irwin said: "We've decided it doesn't fit in with our schedule but it will be published by Knopf in the States."

Knopf will release the title this month.

In an interview in the New York Times, Wright said he has come under pressure while writing the book, receiving many threatening letters from lawyers representing the church or some of the celebrities belonging to it.

Other upcoming books on the movement include The Church of Fear: Inside the Weird World of Scientology by John Sweeney, to be published by Silvertail Books in the UK on 7th January, and Beyond Belief: My Secret Life Inside Scientology and My Harrowing Escape by Jenna Miscavige Hill, due from William Morrow on 12th February, with UK distribution. 

http://www.thebookseller.com/news/transworld-cancels-scientology-title.html   


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on January 07, 2013, 06:31:50 AM
                                  A careful writer stalks the truth about Scientology

By Charles Mcgrath / New York Times News Service
Published: January 06. 2013

http://www.bendbulletin.com/article/20130106/NEWS0107/301060310/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on January 07, 2013, 07:39:12 PM
                                       Scientology book elicits death threats for author
BOOKS


By Charles McGrath THE NEW YORK TIMES

http://www.telegram.com/article/20130106/NEWS/101069755/1312


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on January 07, 2013, 07:41:15 PM

News > World > Americas

'Scientologists believe the Holocaust was planned and carried out by psychiatrists'

Five years on from the Panorama outburst that resulted in a worldwide viral viewing, John Sweeney has written a book on the dangers of the cult religion



The Church of Scientology is a cult whose core aim is to fight a space alien Satan that's brainwashed the rest of us. The Church fights the world's insanity, its celebrity followers argue, and people who tell you differently are bigots. So who's right?

Lawrence Wright is a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter who has written what promises to be a great book on Scientology. Going Clear is due to be published everywhere on 17 January – except Britain. Just before Christmas, Transworld, Wright's British publishers, pulled it, leading to questions about whether it had fallen to the Church's reputation for going after its detractors and Britain's libel laws.

Wright had a huge advance negotiated by über-agent Andrew Wylie, publishers around the world primed to publish on the same day, a reported print run of 150,000 in the US and a team of researchers checking every fact. He will have things to say in his book that readers – especially young people, the audience the Church seeks to recruit – may think they have a right to know. American readers will learn all, while Wright's potential British readers will have no book to buy.

By way of explanation, Transworld's publicity director Patsy Irwin said: "The legal advice that we received was that some of the content of the book was not robust enough for the UK market, that an edited version would not fit with our schedule and the decision was made internally not to publish."

Five years ago I lost my cool, to say the least, during an interview with the Church's senior spokesman Tommy Davis in a BBC Panorama called "Scientology & Me". I apologised then and I apologise now for that tirade, and the footage of which went viral around the world. But in the intervening five years I have remained gravely troubled by the power of the Scientologist Church to intimidate critics and to maintain a hold over its adepts which some say is a kind of mental enslavement. The Church, for its part, says that I am a psychopath – one Scientology blog says: "John Sweeney is genuinely evil."

Five years on from my very public meltdown, I've written a book, called The Church of Fear: Inside the Weird World of Scientology, which is published today. Getting the book out has not been easy. My publisher is a bloke with a dog I met in a park. We are going ahead with our book, come hell or high water, because dog bloke and I feel passionately that this story is in the public interest and it needs to be told.

The reason I went with dog bloke is simple. It wasn't the lavishness of the advance – a pint and a packet of crisps. It was because every single major publisher in Britain said "no" to my book. The reason some gave was legal risk. The Church's lawyers in Britain, Carter-Ruck, libel specialists beloved of celebrities, politicians and major corporations, have said: "Free speech is not an unfettered right." You can say that again.

I don't necessarily blame the publishers. A combination of this expensive legal team and Britain's libel laws make publishing criticism of Scientology in this country a daunting task. In America, the legal test for libel is that the plaintiff has to prove the defendant has actual malice to win. In Britain, our laws – under which the defendant has to prove the truth of what he is saying – have prompted repeated calls for change, with many arguing that they stifle free speech. A reform Bill, which critics say is too weak, is currently crawling through the House of Lords.

Publishers might have had other reasons for not wanting my book in the first place, but it was legal concerns, at least in part, that prompted Transworld to cancel their release of Lawrence Wright's much-anticipated work, having previously agreed to do so. While the book launch will go ahead in other countries, perhaps they felt they just couldn't take on Scientology in the UK.

Dog bloke and I think we can. A word about him. His name is Humfrey Hunter, he is a literary agent turned publisher, his company is Silvertail Books and his father and grandmother were German Jewish psychiatrists. Together, his dad and granny wrote the book that set out the medical evidence that Mad King George suffered from porphyry, the basis for Alan Bennett's The Madness of King George.

I lost my temper with Tommy Davis inside the brainwashing section of the Church's exhibition on psychiatry, "The Industry of Death". Scientologists believe that psychiatry is Nazi pseudoscience. They believe that the Holocaust was planned and carried out by psychiatrists. If you are doing a book about Scientology, then you cannot do better than having the son and grandson of two German-Jewish psychiatrists as your publisher. You don't need capital to publish a book on Scientology – you need courage.

Standing shoulder to shoulder with us are a number of ex-members of the Church who possess that quality. They would, they say, be willing to give evidence in our defence were the Church to sue us: Mike Rinder, former head of the Office of Special Affairs, who quit the Church in 2007 after goading me alongside Tommy; Marc Headley, who says he was audited by Tom Cruise and came with me on my visit to the Church's Trementina Base in New Mexico, where the Church has buried Founder L Ron Hubbard's lectures on discs of gold in an H-bomb-proof vault; Amy Scobee, former head of the Church's Celebrity Centre, and more.

But perhaps the Scientologists will do no more than threaten and bluster. Carter-Ruck were first hired in 2007, Mike Rinder told me, to prepare a case against Panorama. But at the last moment, the Church's Chairman of the Board, David Miscavige (Tom Cruise's best man at his wedding to Katie Holmes and a man accused of violence by several ex-Scientologists, a charge he and the Church flatly deny) pulled out. If they go ahead this time, it should make for an incredibly interesting court case.

"The Church of Fear: Inside the Weird World of Scientology" is published by Silvertail Books and is available in paperback (£12.99) and e-book £3.20 on amazon.co.uk

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/scientologists-believe-the-holocaust-was-planned-and-carried-out-by-psychiatrists-8440369.html


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on January 08, 2013, 07:08:12 AM
John Sweeney: 'Scientologists believe the Holocaust was planned and carried out by psychiatrists'

                               Irish Independent

THE Church of Scientology is a cult whose core aim is to fight a space alien Satan that's brainwashed the rest of us.

The Church fights the world's insanity, its celebrity followers argue, and people who tell you differently are bigots. So who's right?

Lawrence Wright is a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter who has written what promises to be a great book on Scientology. Going Clear is due to be published everywhere on 17 January – except Britain. Just before Christmas, Transworld, Wright's British publishers, pulled it, leading to questions about whether it had fallen to the Church's reputation for going after its detractors and Britain's libel laws.

Wright had a huge advance negotiated by über-agent Andrew Wylie, publishers around the world primed to publish on the same day, a reported print run of 150,000 in the US and a team of researchers checking every fact. He will have things to say in his book that readers – especially young people, the audience the Church seeks to recruit – may think they have a right to know. American readers will learn all, while Wright's potential British readers will have no book to buy.

By way of explanation, Transworld's publicity director Patsy Irwin said: "The legal advice that we received was that some of the content of the book was not robust enough for the UK market, that an edited version would not fit with our schedule and the decision was made internally not to publish."

Five years ago I lost my cool, to say the least, during an interview with the Church's senior spokesman Tommy Davis in a BBC Panorama called "Scientology & Me". I apologised then and I apologise now for that tirade, and the footage of which went viral around the world. But in the intervening five years I have remained gravely troubled by the power of the Scientologist Church to intimidate critics and to maintain a hold over its adepts which some say is a kind of mental enslavement. The Church, for its part, says that I am a psychopath – one Scientology blog says: "John Sweeney is genuinely evil."

Five years on from my very public meltdown, I've written a book, called The Church of Fear: Inside the Weird World of Scientology, which is published today. Getting the book out has not been easy. My publisher is a bloke with a dog I met in a park. We are going ahead with our book, come hell or high water, because dog bloke and I feel passionately that this story is in the public interest and it needs to be told.

The reason I went with dog bloke is simple. It wasn't the lavishness of the advance – a pint and a packet of crisps. It was because every single major publisher in Britain said "no" to my book. The reason some gave was legal risk. The Church's lawyers in Britain, Carter-Ruck, libel specialists beloved of celebrities, politicians and major corporations, have said: "Free speech is not an unfettered right." You can say that again.

I don't necessarily blame the publishers. A combination of this expensive legal team and Britain's libel laws make publishing criticism of Scientology in this country a daunting task. In America, the legal test for libel is that the plaintiff has to prove the defendant has actual malice to win. In Britain, our laws – under which the defendant has to prove the truth of what he is saying – have prompted repeated calls for change, with many arguing that they stifle free speech. A reform Bill, which critics say is too weak, is currently crawling through the House of Lords.

Publishers might have had other reasons for not wanting my book in the first place, but it was legal concerns, at least in part, that prompted Transworld to cancel their release of Lawrence Wright's much-anticipated work, having previously agreed to do so. While the book launch will go ahead in other countries, perhaps they felt they just couldn't take on Scientology in the UK.

Dog bloke and I think we can. A word about him. His name is Humfrey Hunter, he is a literary agent turned publisher, his company is Silvertail Books and his father and grandmother were German Jewish psychiatrists. Together, his dad and granny wrote the book that set out the medical evidence that Mad King George suffered from porphyry, the basis for Alan Bennett's The Madness of King George.

I lost my temper with Tommy Davis inside the brainwashing section of the Church's exhibition on psychiatry, "The Industry of Death". Scientologists believe that psychiatry is Nazi pseudoscience. They believe that the Holocaust was planned and carried out by psychiatrists. If you are doing a book about Scientology, then you cannot do better than having the son and grandson of two German-Jewish psychiatrists as your publisher. You don't need capital to publish a book on Scientology – you need courage.

Standing shoulder to shoulder with us are a number of ex-members of the Church who possess that quality. They would, they say, be willing to give evidence in our defence were the Church to sue us: Mike Rinder, former head of the Office of Special Affairs, who quit the Church in 2007 after goading me alongside Tommy; Marc Headley, who says he was audited by Tom Cruise and came with me on my visit to the Church's Trementina Base in New Mexico, where the Church has buried Founder L Ron Hubbard's lectures on discs of gold in an H-bomb-proof vault; Amy Scobee, former head of the Church's Celebrity Centre, and more.

But perhaps the Scientologists will do no more than threaten and bluster. Carter-Ruck were first hired in 2007, Mike Rinder told me, to prepare a case against Panorama. But at the last moment, the Church's Chairman of the Board, David Miscavige (Tom Cruise's best man at his wedding to Katie Holmes and a man accused of violence by several ex-Scientologists, a charge he and the Church flatly deny) pulled out. If they go ahead this time, it should make for an incredibly interesting court case.

"The Church of Fear: Inside the Weird World of Scientology" is published by Silvertail Books and is available in paperback (£12.99) and e-book £3.20 on amazon.co.uk

- John Sweeney

http://www.independent.ie/opinion/comment/john-sweeney-scientologists-believe-the-holocaust-was-planned-and-carried-out-by-psychiatrists-3344437.html


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on January 08, 2013, 12:01:42 PM
                                        Five Books I’d Read

                                    Washington City Paper

 by Justin Moyer on Jan. 7, 2013

in which the author discusses five books he'd read, if time permitted.

1. Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief, by Lawrence Wright
People always want to talk about John Travolta's religious beliefs, sexuality, terrible hair plugs, terrible Christmas album with Olivia Newton-John, or comeback in Pulp Fiction, but never seem to mention that the guy is—or, at least, used to be—an absolutely incredible dancer. Have you seen Grease lately? Trav is up there swingin' and twistin' and hand jivin' with the best of them. Unbelievable. You go, Trav!

2. Science on American Television: A History, by Marcel Chotkowski LaFollette
Mr. Wizard ruled, but be honest: Did you ever really try to recreate any of his experiments in the kitchen? No. You watched the show, then channel-surfed over to Fox 29 to watch Benson.....

http://www.washingtoncitypaper.com/blogs/artsdesk/books/2013/01/07/five-books-id-read-107/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on January 09, 2013, 06:20:26 AM
                              Transworld cancels Lawrence Wright's Scientology title

                                          The Telegraph

Lawrence Wright's UK publishers have dropped his new book Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood and the Prison of Belief after taking legal advice.



 British publishers Transworld have cancelled their publication of a new book on Scientology, after taking legal advice. Lawrence Wright's highly anticipated book, Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood and the Prison of Belief, is based on his 2011 New Yorker article ‘The Apostate’, for which he interviewed the screenwriter and director Paul Haggis about his decision to resign from the organisation.

Wright is no stranger to investigating secretive organisations. He won the Pulitzer Prize in 2007 for his book The Looming Tower: Al-Qaeda and the Road to 9/11.

Going Clear examines the Church’s founder, L. Ron Hubbard, the church’s finances and its relationships with celebrities such as Tom Cruise and John Travolta. It will be published by US publishers Knopf for American audiences on January 17th with a reported print run of 150,000 copies.

The decision not to publish in this country has prompted questions, particularly as Transworld had previously agreed to it. It seems likely that the threat of libel action in the UK may have contributed to the decision.

Graham Atkins, a partner at Atkins Thomson Solicitors in London who specialise in defamation cases, commented on the decision: “It is more difficult for individual claimants to successfully sue for defamation in the US and therefore it may be that the UK publishers are concerned about prominent Scientologists threatening or commencing libel proceedings in the UK.”

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/9787395/Transworld-cancels-Lawrence-Wrights-Scientology-title.html


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on January 09, 2013, 06:22:38 AM
Scientologists believe the Holocaust was carried out by psychiatrists, claims BBC reporter who starred in infamous Panorama rant video

                        The mail

    Journalist publishes new book five years after Panorama tirade went viral
    He has since apologised, but says he remains 'gravely troubled' by the cult
    He says he is ready to fight controversial religion if they sue him for libel


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2259131/Scientologists-believe-Holocaust-planned-carried-psychiatrists-claims-BBC-rant-reporter-John-Sweeney.html#ixzz2HPSUpuqm
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook



http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2259131/Scientologists-believe-Holocaust-planned-carried-psychiatrists-claims-BBC-rant-reporter-John-Sweeney.html


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on January 09, 2013, 09:09:05 PM
                                   
Diary

The calm before the storm. Britain's Scientologists catch a break

                                   The Guardian



Not long now until the official launch of The Church of Fear, John Sweeney's new book on the Church of Scientology. The event is eagerly awaited, especially by the L Ron Hubbard-ites themselves. For they have a particular view of the author, with whom the church had angry exchanges as he prepared a BBC documentary five years ago. "John Sweeney is genuinely evil," one church blogger said. Still, things could have been worse. They might have been fighting on two fronts; but publisher Transworld confirms it has dropped plans to publish another Scientology exposé that's kicking up quite a bit of dust in the US. Lawrence Wright's Going Clear: Scientology, Celebrity, and the Prison of Belief has been seized upon by the church's critics. At the same time, it has been denounced as "preposterous lies" and attracted a blizzard of legal threats from aggrieved Scientologists. It was published in the US by Knopf – part of Random House – but Transworld in the UK, also part of Random House, took a look and didn't fancy its chances. "The full manuscript didn't come in until the end of November, at which point we did a full risk assessment," MD Larry Finlay told the website Publishing Perspectives. "Our advice was that we wouldn't be able to defend it in the UK courts. The UK has much more stringent libel laws, which is why so many cases are taken up here. If we had wanted to go ahead with the book there was too much to change." Publishable in the US. Too risky by far for London. That's comforting isn't it?

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2013/jan/09/hugh-muir-diary-scientology-wright


                                        The Los Angeles Times

                           British publisher drops Lawrence Wright's new Scientology book

http://www.latimes.com/features/books/jacketcopy/la-et-jc-british-publisher-drops-lawrence-wrights-new-scientology-book-20130108,0,3033993.story


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on January 13, 2013, 07:02:26 AM
                        Review: 'Going Clear' by Lawrence Wright

Lawrence Wright's 'Going Clear' offers complex view, arguing the question of legitimacy is moot
January 11, 2013|By Troy Jollimore

http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2013-01-11/news/ct-prj-0113-going-clear-lawrence-wright-20130111_1_scientology-lawrence-wright-ron-hubbard


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on January 15, 2013, 07:02:23 AM
                                      The BBC, Scientology and morons



14 January 2013

Following my story about Church of Fear: Inside the Weird World of Scientology, author John Sweeney has asked me to point out he criticised some BBC bosses as overpaid morons at his launch party, not his colleagues.

“They’re not morons and I never said that. The ‘morons’ quote came from my speech at a lively launch party for my book. I referred to my 2007 interview with Scientologist Anne Archer when I tried in vain to get her to admit some flaw in her church. I said that I liked the BBC very much, but, to be critical, some of the bosses were overpaid morons.”


http://www.standard.co.uk/news/londoners-diary/the-bbc-scientology-and-morons-8450923.html


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on January 15, 2013, 11:45:56 AM
                              'Going Clear' takes on Scientology's celebrity fixation

                                            L.A. TIMES

Lawrence Wright's look at the church's rise goes from the early exploits of late founder L. Ron Hubbard to the movement's star-driven history and Tom Cruise's rise in the ranks.


By Evan Wright, Special to the Los Angeles Times

January 14, 2013

Who'd have thought a history of a religion would offer so many guilty pleasures? Lawrence Wright's enthralling account of Scientology's rise, "Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief," brims with celebrity scandal. To anyone who gets a sugar rush from Hollywood gossip, the chapters on Tom Cruise and John Travolta will feel like eating a case of Ding Dongs.

But celebrities are serious business in Scientology. L. Ron Hubbard, who founded his church in Los Angeles in 1954, recognized their value in attracting followers. Through a church publication, he urged adherents to recruit Marlene Dietrich, Bob Hope and Walt Disney, advising them, "If you want one of these celebrities as your game, write us at once so the notable will be yours to hunt without interference."

Hubbard's scheme to bag the famous yielded uneven results, but starting in the 1970s a wave of ambitious young unknowns entered his church. Lured by the promise of its newly opened Celebrity Centre, they sought fame (and enlightenment). Among them were Travolta and Cruise. Another was writer-director Paul Haggis. Despite the acclaim garnered by his Oscar-winning films, Haggis lived in comparative obscurity as a Hollywood Scientologist. That changed in 2009 when Haggis resigned from the church and became its best-known apostate.

Wright first wrote about Haggis' break with Scientology in a 2011 New Yorker profile. He'd previously received a Pulitzer Prize for his reporting on Al Qaeda in "The Looming Tower"; taking on Scientology was arguably riskier. (In fact, the book's British publisher, Transworld, announced that it was canceling publication.) But in Haggis he had a unique source. The success in Hollywood that had made Haggis so desirable to the church also made him a potent critic. Haggis quit the church over its failure to support gay rights, but in Wright's original New Yorker piece, Haggis attacked the core of the church, calling its most sacred doctrines "madness."

In "Going Clear," Haggis' story serves as a jumping-off point into the improbable life of L. (for "Lafayette") Ron Hubbard. Possessed with colossal ambition from a young age, Hubbard told his first wife, "I have high hopes of smashing my name into history so violently that it will take a legendary form," according to Wright.

Self-confidence is an esteemed American trait. Hubbard's was coupled with a thirst for adventure and an imagination so vivid he lived his life as if it were a work of fiction. This is another way of saying he may have been a pathological liar, as he appears in Wright's rendering. Born in 1911, Hubbard grew up in Montana yet had an odd seafaring life. His father was in the Navy, posted in Asia, and periodically Hubbard shipped out to visit him. In journals Hubbard mythologized his trips into grand adventures. He had nerve enough for real danger too. Dropping out of college, he became a stunt pilot. Then, he chartered a schooner, advertised himself as an experienced sea captain and led more than 50 paying customers on a "buccaneers" adventure to the Caribbean to explore pirate haunts. After a series of calamities, Hubbard jumped ship in Puerto Rico.

He discovered a form of adventure for which he was ideally suited: writing for pulp magazines. Words flowed so quickly, Hubbard typed onto a roll of butcher paper. He told editors that his stories about cowboys and explorers were autobiographical. He also claimed to be a nuclear physicist, but his inability, or unwillingness, to distinguish fact from fantasy was no problem then. Entering the Navy in World War II, it was. He talked his way into command of a warship, then during training, led his crew on an epic mission against Japanese subs that an inquest later determined had never existed. He was relieved of his command after another incident in which he ordered his men to bombard Mexico.

After the war, Hubbard drifted to California. Wright says that he told people he'd been grievously wounded. He couldn't work and suffered from nightmares. Although his only combat had involved imaginary submarines, he displayed classic symptoms of what would now be called PTSD. He set about healing himself. Hubbard claimed his method was scientific yet came from revelations. He told friends that while undergoing oral surgery at the dentist's office, he'd died, traveled to an alternate dimension, unlocked the secrets of the universe and returned in order to reveal them.

He called his method "Dianetics." It was a blend of psychoanalysis, Eastern spiritualism and claims that those who achieved enlightenment — called becoming "Clear" — could boost their IQs and heal cancer. His book "Dianetics" became a bestseller in 1950 and touched off a movement. Over the next four years Hubbard organized it into a religion. Scientology, as he rebranded it, offered a lively creation myth centering on alien invasions and ancient atomic wars.

His gospel appears no more or less absurd than those on which other religions are based. In his, immortal beings fly around in space ships. In others, they walk on water. Is there really a difference? Many people found that the mental exercises and talk therapy sold by Scientology improved their sense of well-being. Those who attained enlightenment often believed they acquired the god-like powers that the church had promised them. When he was starting out, filmmaker Haggis had a close friend who marveled at what he believed was his new power to change traffic lights using his mind.

Hubbard's real innovation was figuring out how to sell enlightenment more effectively than his competitors. Traditional churches offered it for free, then hoped for donations. In Scientology, novices were required to pay from the beginning.

A Scientology "church" was basically a place where books, tapes, classes and therapy sessions were sold. Enlightenment was sold in graduated steps. Those who got it could in turn open their own "missions" and run them like McDonald's franchises, taking a share of the profits. The church became a cash machine, generating an estimated billion dollars in liquid holdings, in addition to a vast real estate empire. Those entering today can expect to pay as much as $300,000 to attain enlightenment, according to Wright.

"Going Clear" catalogs many abuses, from the covert effort to infiltrate the IRS to the church's employment of ex-CIA officers to spy on its own members, as alleged by Wright. For many years, Hubbard led his church from a converted freighter with hundreds of followers aboard on whom he practiced all manner of strange punishments. Some were locked in hot boxes, fed gruel, dressed in rags. Others were "overboarded" — tied up and tossed in the sea (then fished out before drowning). Wright describes one instance in which Hubbard ordered followers "to race each other around the rough, splintery decks while pushing peanuts with their noses."

Still, there was fun: Hubbard kept his followers active on the Italian coast hunting treasure that he said he'd buried in a past life.

There's no shortage of insane anecdotes in "Going Clear." Many involve Tom Cruise. Since Hubbard's death in 1986, Cruise has become Scientology's leading pitchman. Wright portrays him as being in the thrall of David Miscavige, the Rasputin-like figure who now runs the church. The most revealing story in the book concerns Miscavige's alleged masterminding of a scheme to headhunt a young church member for Cruise to marry. According to Wright, after Cruise dumped her (to marry Katie Holmes), the church ordered her to scrub toilets with a toothbrush because she confided in a friend about her experience with Cruise and couldn't stop crying.

One suspects Cruise was ignorant of her fate. That's the main point in "Going Clear": Enlightenment in Hubbard's church may cause blindness.

Wright's book comes at a time of heightened focus on Scientology. As he acknowledges, Janet Reitman's book "Inside Scientology," published in 2011, helped lay the groundwork for his expose. Yet for all the critical attention, Hubbard earns grudging respect. His religion, combining money, celebrity and enlightenment as it does, is unmistakably a product of Southern California. It may be the truest religion of the land.

Wright (no relation to Lawrence) is the author of "Generation Kill" and, most recently, the author of "How to Get Away with Murder in America," published by Byliner.

calendar@latimes.com


http://www.latimes.com/features/books/jacketcopy/la-ca-jc-lawrence-wright-20130113,0,5406147.story


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on January 17, 2013, 06:43:46 AM
                                       The SUN

'Scientology leader dresses his beagles as captains and makes followers salute them...'
Amazing claims about cult by author Lawrence Wright


Read more: http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/features/4746361/Sensational-claims-about-the-world-of-Scientology-from-book-unlikely-to-be-published-in-UK-but-can-be-revealed-by-The-Sun.html#ixzz2IAJitTPi




Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on January 19, 2013, 07:26:09 AM
      Scientology Expose From Pulitzer Prize Winner Levels Accusations Against Church, Draws Controversy


A Scientology expose written by a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist has unloaded some heavy claims against the church, saying that its founder lied about much of his background and its current leader is known for brutalizing subordinates.

The widely anticipated book from journalist and author Lawrence Wright, Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief, was released on Thursday.

Among the revelations in the Scientology expose was news that founder L. Ron Hubbard frequently beat his second wife and once hit her with a pistol because she was smiling in her sleep. The Daily Beast highlighted other claims in the Scientology book, like how leader David Miscavige was known to beat subordinates.

The Scientology expose caused controversy even before its release. In late 2012, the church worked with Atlantic magazine to run an advertising campaign to coincide with the book’s release. The magazine published an advertorial on Monday lauding the church’s accomplishments.

This led to widespread criticism and mockery of the article, especially when it became clear that the magazine was closely monitoring comments on the article. Within 12 hours, the magazine pulled it from its website. The Atlantic also admitted that running the article was a mistake.

Wright himself has come under attack from church leaders, as have other journalists who wrote unflattering accounts of it in the past. On January 11, the church released a statement saying it was “nothing more than a stale rehash of allegations disproven long ago.”

But others in the media have stood behind him. The winner of a Pulitzer Prize in 2006 for his book on al Qaeda, The Looming Tower, Wright is widely respected among media members.

“Wright is known for his thoroughness and for his legal pads and his filing-card system, which in the computer age is as complicated and as antique as the historian Robert Caro’s,” New York Times writer Charles McGrath noted in an article about the Scientology expose.

Read more at http://www.inquisitr.com/486242/scientology-expose-from-pulitzer-prize-winner-levels-accusations-against-church-draws-controversy/#7szoso44jmyHIZsG.99

                              The Washington Post

http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/book-review-going-clear-scientology-hollywood-and-the-prison-of-belief-by-lawrence-wright/2013/01/18/69143f3e-55df-11e2-bf3e-76c0a789346f_story.html


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on January 24, 2013, 04:31:24 PM
                           New Book:             Son of Scientology: Dad, L Ron and Me

http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?30173-New-Book-Son-of-Scientology-Dad-L-Ron-and-Me


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on February 08, 2013, 06:42:54 AM

                Scientology hides from grave allegations behind the mask of religion

L Ron Hubbard's church is under increasing attack, but by calling itself a religion Scientology is shielded from scrutiny

   

    John Sweeney
        John Sweeney   
        guardian.co.uk, Thursday 7 February 2013



Millions of Americans watching the Super Bowl were treated to a soft-voiced ad featuring knitting pattern magazine models boosting the church that L Ron built, but elsewhere the Scientology spring is gathering pace. The latest hammer blow against the church that likes to wear dark glasses is Beyond Belief: My Secret Life Inside Scientology and My Harrowing Escape – a misery memoir by Jenna Miscavige Hill, alleging that her uncle, Scientology's "Pope" David Miscavige, is evil. A charge he denies.

Add a major lawsuit in the US by aggrieved ex-members, a criminal prosecution in Belgium, a war of attrition across the internet and three highly critical books so far this year.

Fear of Britain's libel laws meant that Going Clear by Lawrence Wright was not formally published in the UK, and no big UK publisher would touch my book, Church of Fear, but all three books are now on sale and make for horrible reading for "Pope" Miscavige and his celebrity apostles Tom Cruise and John Travolta.

Yet critics who hope that the end of the Church of Scientology is nigh are probably deluded, until someone powerful and brave on the other side of the Atlantic steps in.

Not every action of the government of the United States of America is for the best. Not every British institution is bone from the neck up.

Take the decision by the Internal Revenue Service – the American tax man – in 1993 under the Clinton administration to stop treating the Church of Scientology as a business and reclassify it as a religion.

"Pope" Miscavige – later, Tom Cruise's best man at the star's wedding to Katie Holmes – told his faithful: "The pipeline of IRS false reports won't keep flowing across the planet. There will be no more nothing – because on October 1 1993, at 8.37pm Eastern Standard Time, the IRS issued letters recognising Scientology and every one of its organisations as fully tax exempt! The war is over!" Everyone clapped.

Not everything that calls itself a religion is a religion. It could be a multibillion-dollar corporate, an organisation with a mafia-like hold over followers, or a brainwashing cult. Some ex-members say the Church of Scientology is all three.

On this side of the Atlantic, as far as the Charity Commissioners are concerned, for the purposes of English charity law: "Scientology is not a religion."

In Britain, Scientology's war, as it were, is not over.

Yet the church is protected in the US – its spiritual home – by the shield of that word, religion.

Words bite. Rebaptise a thing a religion and it is instantly better protected from scrutiny, mockery and taxes. Add the shield of religion to its treasure and power to intimidate, and the Church of Scientology may seem untouchable. Is it?

The dictionary definition of a religion is: "The belief in and worship of a superhuman controlling power, especially a personal God or gods." But who is the superhuman controlling power Scientologists believe in? No Scientologist will tell you.

The underlying logic of the British test is that a religion must be open to all and open about itself.

Alex Klein wrote on BuzzFeed: "All religions have their Xenus, multi-armed elephants, or magic babies, their morally ambiguous prophets, their tall tales and scandals."

That's not quite right. Go into a Christian church and they will tell you about the "magic baby", Jesus. You will see images of him, everywhere, dating back almost 2,000 years. Go into a Hindu temple and you will see images of Ganesh, the multi-armed elephant God, everywhere, images that go back millennia. Go into a Church of Scientology Org and you will see no image of Xenu. No member of the Church of Scientology will admit to Xenu's existence, but ex-Scientologists say he is at the heart of its cosmology. Scientology fails the British test of what is or is not a religion because it is not open about what it believes in. A belief system that tells lies about its core belief does not have the automatic right to be treated as a religion.

This is not a purely cosmological dispute, as I have found out, while investigating the church for half a decade. (I started badly by losing my temper with Scientologist Tommy Davis while making BBC Panorama's Scientology and Me in 2007. I apologised then; I apologise now.)

Law enforcement gives religion the warm shoulder. While making a follow-up Panorama in 2010, we became aware that some of our interviewees had met the FBI previously. The Feds and Panorama were both working on a parallel investigation: its subject allegations of physical and psychological abuse that the church categorically denies. Ex-members of the church – such as Mike Rinder, its former spokesman and head of the office of special affairs, who had "defected" to Panorama – gave specific evidence of that abuse, backed up by several other senior ex-Scientologists. (The church has an online cartoon of Rinder as a fanged cobra.)

Thanks to what critics say is the absurdity of Britain's libel laws, we were unable to broadcast the most shocking allegations of abuse in 2010 – they're in my book – but we did air grave criticisms of the church. The FBI investigation has gone nowhere. The reason? One ex-Scientologist who assisted the FBI told me: "They got it. The investigators we were talking to knew what they were doing. Then someone upstairs seemed to raise the stakes. They had to have video evidence of wrongdoing, an admission of guilt, or else nothing would happen."

Of course, all of the above may well be untrue and the FBI investigation may have failed for the simple fact that there was nothing to investigate.

All I know for certain is that an FBI investigation was running and nothing has happened. It turned out, my source said, that the church had more money to spend on this and more resolve than the FBI. The thing that may have killed the investigation was that the FBI was afraid of taking on an official religion. If true, that does not sound good. Perhaps Britain's Charity Commissioners should have a word with the G-Men. They don't tote tommy guns but they can spot a non-religion when they see one.

• This article was amended on 7 February 2013. The sixth paragraph originally referred to the Inland Revenue Service. It should have been the Internal Revenue Service, and this has now been corrected.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/feb/07/scientology-hides-allegations-mask-religion


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on February 16, 2013, 10:43:17 PM

                    This column will change your life: do you believe in brainwashing?

                                            The Guardian

'There isn't a hidden switch that lets villains control your thoughts; instead, there are TV ads and manipulative friends and guilt-inducing religions'....

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2013/feb/16/brainwashing-scientology-oliver-burkeman




Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on February 16, 2013, 10:52:09 PM
 NEW! Have You Told All? Inside My Time with Narconon and Scientology, by Lucas Catton

    New book! Have You Told All?: Inside My Time with Narconon and Scientology, by Lucas Catton

    http://www.amazon.com/Have-You-Told-All-Scientology/dp/0615768725/

    Have You Told All?: Inside My Time with Narconon and Scientology [Paperback]

    Lucas A. Catton (Author)
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=ntt_athr_dp_sr_1?_encoding=UTF8&field-author=Lucas%20A.%20Catton&search-alias=books&sort=relevancerank


    Price:    $14.95 & eligible for FREE Super Saver Shipping on orders over $25. Details
       

    In Stock.

    Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

    Book Description Publication Date: February 13, 2013

    Lucas Catton was a Scientologist for 12 years and contributed to many Scientology-related activities. He was introduced to the organization primarily through its rehabilitation program Narconon, and worked with them for over ten years in various capacities, including as President of their flagship facility in Oklahoma called Narconon Arrowhead. He sits in a unique position of having arguably more knowledge than anyone else who has publicly addressed the inner workings of the Narconon network and its connection to Scientology in the 21st century. He decided to speak out publicly following a series of deaths tied to Narconon in hopes to shed more light on its operations as well as to stop the harmful practices of the church of Scientology.

    Product Details


        Paperback: 212 pages
        Publisher: Catton Communications (February 13, 2013)
        Language: English
        ISBN-10: 0615768725
        ISBN-13: 978-0615768724
        Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.5 inches
        Shipping Weight: 13.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
        Average Customer Review: Be the first to review this item
        Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #109,242 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
            #28 in Books > Religion & Spirituality > Other Religions, Practices & Sacred Texts > Scientology

http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?30532-NEW!-Have-You-Told-All-Inside-My-Time-with-Narconon-and-Scientology-by-Lucas-Catton


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on February 18, 2013, 08:43:05 AM
                                  Publishers weekly Best sellers list

12    11      4
   
Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief
Lawrence Wright, Author
Knopf Publishing Group, $28.95 (448)
978-0-307-70066-7
   Jan
2013    5,457
26,470

-----------------------------------------
13    8      2
   
Remembering Whitney: My Story of Love, Loss, and the Night the Music Stopped
Cissy Houston, Author, Lisa Dickey, With, Dionne Warwick, Foreword by
Harper, $27.99 (297)
978-0-06-223839-9
   Jan
2013    5,110
13,046

----------------------------------------------------
14     -      1    
Beyond Belief: My Secret Life Inside Scientology and My Harrowing Escape
Jenna Miscavige Hill, Author, Lisa Pulitzer, With
William Morrow & Company, $27.99 (404)
978-0-06-224847-3
   Feb
2013    4,823
4,850

http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/nielsen/HardcoverNonfiction.html


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on February 20, 2013, 07:23:48 AM
                                       New York Times best sellers list
       
               

February 24, 2013
Feb 17, 2013-
Mar 03, 2013


COMBINED PRINT & E-BOOK NONFICTION

    AMERICAN SNIPER, by Chris Kyle with Scott McEwen and Jim DeFelice
    PROOF OF HEAVEN, by Eben Alexander
    MY BELOVED WORLD, by Sonia Sotomayor
    BEYOND BELIEF, by Jenna Miscavige Hill with Lisa Pulitzer
    GOING CLEAR, by Lawrence Wright


http://www.nytimes.com/best-sellers-books/overview.html


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on February 21, 2013, 02:10:36 PM
                                            PaulsRabbit Ebooks

    There are 3 eBooks containing Alan C. Walter's writings that I have made available in the past couple of months. I finished "The ESMB Posts" a couple of days ago. I intended to add the descriptions to my PaulsRabbit thread. Imagine my horror to find that I appear to have never created a PaulsRabbit thread!

    PaulsRabbit at http://paulsrabbit.com is home to several free eBooks, all but one of which I have created. The prior three have been described quite a bit on ESMB.

    These new ones are:

    The ESMB Posts
    Alan Walter's ESMB posts. Between January 2007 and September 2009 Alan made 3,303 posts to ESMB. I went through them all and selected out the 1241 posts to 420 threads that I considered worth preserving in an eBook. There are clickable thread titles and post date/time headings, and the thread titles also link back to the original ESMB thread online. 775 pages in the PDF, about 275,000 words total. Available in PDF and Kindle (MOBI) formats, both electronically searchable.

    ACW Lightlink Archives
    All 130 articles archived by Homer from Alan's writings to alt.clearing.technology in the 90s, bookmarked with titles and original designations, electronically searchable, 400 pages, 140000 words. Available in PDF and Kindle (MOBI) formats.

    Knowledgism Dictionary
    121 pages, 44000 words. Available in PDF and Kindle (MOBI) formats, both electronically searchable.

    -----

    If you don't have a Kindle, or don't have the Kindle app on an iPad or iPhone or iPod Touch, download the Kindle for PC app (free) from http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/feature.h...cId=1000423913 or some other link, easy enough to find online. If you have never read an eBook on the free Kindle for PC (or Mac etc) application, you should take a look. It is quite something.

    Paul

http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?30617-PaulsRabbit-Ebooks


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on February 22, 2013, 06:48:36 AM
                     TV reporter known for Scientology spat to speak about book

"Mr Sweeney said: "I'm coming to East Grinstead to give a talk in a pub – I've no idea how many people will turn up."

Read more: http://www.thisissussex.co.uk/TV-reporter-known-Scientology-spat-speak-book/story-18209473-detail/story.html#ixzz2LYqDa6di
Follow us: @this_is_sussex on Twitter | thisissussex on Facebook


            John Sweeney: Why Church of Scientology's gravest threat is the 'net

   

A beautiful machine for free speech, says BBC reporter

By Ollie Henry • Get more from this author

Posted in Media, 21st February 2013 14:34 GMT

Interview Back in 1995, when the net was still young, the late Robert Vaughn Young, an ex-scientologist, said the internet would be to Scientology what Vietnam was to the US: an unwinnable war.

Vaughn Young, a former spokesman for the controversial organisation, believed that the internet would create the first place where Scientology could be discussed openly.

Free speech has been an issue for the Church of Scientology (CoS) for a long time, and the internet has become the battleground of choice for those who want the church to be more open about its teachings. Not least, online activist groups, such as Anonymous, that targeted the church in a campaign against cyber-censorship....


http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/02/21/scientology_internet_threat/



Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on March 31, 2013, 07:29:31 AM
                                          Books expose Church of Scientology from different angles
By Clay Evans For the Camera
Posted:   03/29/2013

http://www.dailycamera.com/books/ci_22900115/church-scientology-exposed-two-new-books?source=rss


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on April 11, 2013, 07:57:15 AM
                            Skeptic magazine latest issue

Our old friend Jim Lippard reviews the three big recent books — by Lawrence Wright, John Sweeney, and Jenna Miscavige Hill — and brings readers of Skeptic magazine up to date on what ails Scientology.


http://www.skeptic.com/eskeptic/13-04-10/


                                   THE NEW YORK REVIEW OF BOOKS

                                      Scientology: The Story
April 11, 2013
Diane Johnson
E-mail Print Share

Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief
by Lawrence Wright
Knopf, 430 pp., $28.95                                                 

Beyond Belief: My Secret Life Inside Scientology and My Harrowing Escape
by Jenna Miscavige Hill, with Lisa Pulitzer
William Morrow, 404 pp., $27.99     

Not to be read home alone on a stormy night: Going Clear, Lawrence Wright’s scary book about Scientology and its influence, with its accounts of vindictive lawyers and apostate captives confined in the “Hole,” a building that held dozens of people at a time. It’s a true horror story, the most comprehensive among a number of books published on the subject in the past few years, many of them personal accounts by people who have managed to escape or were evicted from the clutches of a group they came to feel was destroying them.

Wright’s report on the rich, aggressive organization (now we are supposed to say “new religious movement”) infiltrating the government and intimidating judges seems even more immediate now that we’ve seen the giant Scientology ad at the 2013 Super Bowl, and the Scientology “advertorial” on the website of The Atlantic, before it was hastily taken down—both perhaps intended by the Church of Scientology as damage control ahead of the publication of Wright’s evenhanded, chilling, and distinctly circumspect investigation. ...

http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2013/apr/25/scientology-story/?pagination=false


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on September 20, 2013, 02:16:08 AM
                                              Book release: "1984" by Geir Isene


There is media attention regarding my book release today. I added the most important media appearances on my blog:

The most read Norwegian magazine (Se & Hør) featured Anette and me in a 4-page article today (17th). This was also their 35 year anniversary issue.
I was interviewed on the main Norwegian TV station, NRK (17th @ 19:30 CET), regarding Scientology. I told about abuses and insanity at the top, reaching some 1 million viewers.

                                       


Check the blog post for links to the media coverage.

If you are interested and want to practice your Norwegian, you can also follow the book release event via live streaming (link provided in the blog post).

[Hey, OSA - this is your excellent chance to cover this event without risking a fragile Scientologist's mental well being by exposure to upper level material. Just let an OT 8 that speaks Norwegian (hello Gro in Clearwater) view the event live in a top security room. I Promise not to track your IP address. Except.. if the technology fails us, you would wish you had sent a representative...]


http://isene.me/2013/09/16/book-1984/



Geir, do you have plans to release this book in English?

My publisher is looking for a US publisher to partner up with. So, yes.

The interesting point about my book is that it is the only book revealing all the OT levels written by a person who has actually done them - so the Church cannot wave it off with arguments of "heresay" or "scraped up and rehashed rumors and urban myths from the Net", etc.


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on September 27, 2013, 08:06:44 AM
                                                                               Jon Atack

                                                                     "A piece of blue sky" now an audio book...
Friday 27 September 2013 12:05AM
Jon was a young artist and former Buddhist when he became a Scientologist, after a painful relationship break-up. He was a member for nine years.

The book he later researched and wrote, A Piece Of Blue Sky, outlined the history and practices of the notoriously secretive church and its founder.

After the book's publication in 1990, Jon was sued, and says his family was subject to a lengthy campaign of harassment. He describes the surveillance and harassment as being a deliberate strategy of Scientology, known as 'fair game', with which they answer critics.

After almost twenty years of public silence on the subject of Scientology, Jon spoke this year at a cult conference in Copenhagen.

Jon's book has been re-published by Createspace as Let's Sell These People A Piece Of Blue Sky.

Listen or download audio

http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/conversations/jon-atack/4983240

http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2013/09/25/3856034.htm?site=conversations


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on December 03, 2013, 08:54:59 PM
                                                        A Sucker Born Every Session - NEW BOOK


Skip Press is going to publish a book on his experiences in scientology and more.

The title is - "A Sucker Born Every Session: My Misadventures in $cientology".

It will be out around April 2014 and I am sure it will be a great addition to the existing expose'.

More info here: http://www.skippress.com/newsletter.htm?newsletter

Skip will publish it regardless, but any help is appreciated: http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/a-sucker-born-every-session
Cheers.

                                     VIDEO


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on December 06, 2013, 07:08:00 AM
                                   RUSSELL MILLER’S BARE-FACED MESSIAH, BACK IN PRINT IN FEBRUARY!

Posted December 5 2013

http://tonyortega.org/2013/12/05/russell-millers-bare-faced-messiah-back-in-print-in-february/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on February 22, 2014, 05:52:31 AM
                                    Santeria, Scientology, Satanism — oh my! Atheist author explores minority religions


If you answered “not much,” you’re far from alone. Studies have shown that a great number of Americans are ignorant about major religions—so it’s no surprise that, when it comes to minority religions, misinformation and stigma are widespread.

Atheist author Dr. Karen Stollznow, a linguist and former researcher at the University of California, Berkeley, wanted to change that. So she traveled across the U.S. to visit and study minority religious communities.

The result: her recent book God Bless America: Strange and Unusual Religious Beliefs and Practices in the United States, which offers an insightful look at minority religious communities in the U.S.

Below, Dr. Stollznow tells me what she learned while writing God Bless America and why she thinks all people, religious and nonreligious alike, need to learn about minority religions.

- See more at: http://chrisstedman.religionnews.com/2014/02/20/santeria-scientology-satanism-oh-karen-stollznow-understanding-minority-religions/#sthash.Q5XIwL0B.dpuf


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on April 01, 2014, 09:38:33 PM
                                           The book Scientology tried to ban

                                                                                                           New York Post.


By Tony OrtegaMarch 29, 2014

http://nypost.com/2014/03/29/the-book-scientology-spent-27-years-trying-to-ban/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on May 29, 2014, 04:38:08 PM
                          The Grand Scam by Rob Rose Reveals Scientology Founder L Ron Hubbard’s Support of Apartheid

In Rob Rose’s book The Grand Scam he investigates Barry Tannenbaum’s con, the largest to be pulled off in South Africa’s history. The book also touches on Scientology founder L Ron Hubbard’s time living in South Africa and his support of apartheid architect Hendrik Verwoed, who was the Prime Minister at the time.
Rose writes that Hubbard’s views on apartheid have been glossed over by Scientologists and he quotes from a letter in which Hubbard says to Verwoed: “you have conceived and created in the Johannesburg townships what is probably the most impressive and adequate resettlement in existence”.
Larry Schlesigner has written about the links explored by Rose, sharing snippets from the book:
Rob Rose writes: “What Scientologists don’t want you to know is exactly what was in those letters to the South African ministers. He continues:
They’ve gone out of their way to airbrush Hubbard’s craven fawning over the apartheid government, specifically, his gushing praise for the father of the racist ideology, Dr Hendrik Verwoerd....

http://zebra.bookslive.co.za/blog/2014/05/28/the-grand-scam-by-rob-rose-reveals-scientology-founder-l-ron-hubbards-support-of-apartheid/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on July 18, 2014, 09:08:57 AM
                                   NEW book: Human Trafficking by the US Church of Scientology, by Steven Douglas

http://www.amazon.com/Human-Trafficking-US-Church-Scientology-ebook/dp/B00LS4XKKY/

Length: 48 pages (estimated)

Book Description

Publication Date: July 13, 2014

The US Government repeatedly approved the issuance of R1 religious worker visas (or R2 for children under 21 and spouses related to the R1 recipients) to unknowing Russian Scientologists in the mid to late 1990’s. In the case of the Russians who went to the Church of Scientology, the US Government made possible a transnational crime that would inevitably take place each time one of their unknowing victims would arrive at the Church of Scientology's Flagship in Clearwater, Florida USA.

This book includes interviews with two Russian Scientologists who were convinced to leave their local churches and travel to the world headquarters of Scientology where they would receive training allowing them to return to their home churches as successful Scientologists. What they found was nothing short of menial labor. All promises were broken.

Also included in this book are interview with government, media and trafficking shelters in Russia with additional sad and horrific stories of other Russian trafficking victims. One interview with an anonymous Russian police Captain explores how young women are trafficked from Russia and why it remains difficult to impossible to find missing victims once they have been trafficked.

Show less


Product Details


File Size: 808 KB
Print Length: 48 pages
Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
Language: English
ASIN: B00LS4XKKY
Text-to-Speech: Enabled
X-Ray:
Not Enabled
Lending: Enabled
Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #64,405 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
#12
in Books > Religion & Spirituality > Other Religions, Practices & Sacred Texts > Scientology
#73
in Kindle Store > Kindle eBooks > Religion & Spirituality > Other Religions, Practices & Sacred Texts


http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?36471-NEW-book-Human-Trafficking-by-the-US-Church-of-Scientology-by-Steven-Douglas


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on August 17, 2014, 07:15:02 AM
                                           Money, Power, Servitude: Adventures in the Wonderland of Scientology

Peter Bonyai was a senior official in the Church of Scientology. He shares his unique insider information and insights into what really goes on in Scientology. He describes his 8 year journey from walking in off the street as a naive 17 year old to rising through the ranks as the second-in-command of the Central European branch of the Church — and what ultimately broke the spell and allowed him to walk out the door and back into the real world. He tells his story with humor, which makes this sometimes shocking account of life inside a cult easier to digest. This is a book the Church of Scientology does not want you to read.

 [Kindle Edition] 

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MPY40Y6



 http://www.mikerindersblog.org/money-power-servitude/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on November 10, 2014, 04:10:44 AM
                                           A new Biography of the person who audited LRH on the "History of Man" incidents

    In 1950 a young college professor, Perry Anthony Chapdelaine Sr., forsook his profession for a new career as a Hubbard Dianetic Auditor. With his wife and infant son safely home at her parents’ home in Mobile, Alabama, he drove over eleven hundred miles to Elizabeth, New Jersey, where he attended the HDA (Hubbard Dianetic Auditor) Course at the original Hubbard Dianetic Research Foundation.

    After his graduation, from the last HDA Course before the New Jersey Attorney General shut down the Foundation, Perry formed two Dianetic groups in Alabama. He attended the First Annual Conference of Hubbard Dianetic Auditors, June of 1951, in Wichita, Kansas, where he was elected as secretary of the newly formed Association of Hubbard Dianetic Auditors, International.

    Perry moved his family to Wichita and went to work as an auditor for Hubbard. He was LRH’s auditor when Hubbard ran through all the incidents that would later comprise his book – History of Man. Perry also helped Hubbard formulate the Axioms and Postulates of Dianetics. All through the rest of 1951 he attended over thirty six of Hubbard’s lectures learning all the latest developments in Dianetics.

    In 1952 Perry helped one of his PC’s become the world’s first Clear. With interest in Dianetics down trending due to the inability of anyone to create a Clear, Perry took it upon himself to tour the country and spread his message “Yes, a Clear is possible”. He opened his own Dianetic Center later that year and eventually moved to Phoenix, Arizona where he bought a house where he could settle down and audit full time.

    By 1954, with a growing family and a scarcity of paying PC’s, Perry made the decision to leave Dianetics behind him and find better job opportunities.

    In July, 2014, Perry was interviewed about his time in Dianetics and a decision was made to create his biography in order to showcase his stories of the early days of Dianetics.

    We are pleased to announce the publication of Perry Anthony Chapdelaine Sr.’s biography. His biography contains over seven thousand words and the eleven interviews, which range in topics from the History of Man session, Perry’s meeting with Volney Mathison, to Perry’s perception of Mary Sue Whipp when she first appeared in Wichita.

    His biography may be viewed at - http://scientolipedia.org/info/Perry_Chapdelaine

    Thanks;

    Howard Dickman

http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?37555-A-new-Biography-of-the-person-who-audited-LRH-on-the-quot-History-of-Man-quot-incidents


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on January 11, 2015, 05:35:11 PM
                             Title, Art & Cover Revealed for Tony Ortega's Upcoming Explosive Scientology Expose

London-based Silvertail Books is to publish The Unbreakable Miss Lovely by Tony Ortega, the story of the life of author Paulette Cooper, the most famous victim of the Church of Scientology's notorious and ruthless 'Fair Game' retaliation schemes.

Ortega, the former editor-in-chief of The Village Voice, spent two years working with Cooper, interviewing her and reviewing her personal papers, as well as interviewing dozens of people, many of whom have never spoken publicly before, in order to piece together this stunning account of what it can cost someone to unearth Scientology's secrets.

His sources include witnesses to Cooper's harassment and, in a few cases, people who took part in it. Those interviews, as well as documents which have never been previously made public, provide the first full telling of what Paulette Cooper experienced - from her childhood in a Nazi concentration camp, to her life as a New York magazine writer, to becoming the most famous target of Scientology's revenge.

London-based Silvertail Books previously published BBC journalist John Sweeney's book, The Church of Fear: Inside the Weird World of Scientology, and last year brought Russell Miller's landmark biography of Scientology's founder, Bare-Faced Messiah: The True Story of L. Ron Hubbard, back into print for the first time in 27 years.

Silvertail publisher Humfrey Hunter said: "A lot of people have been waiting a long time for Tony Ortega to write a book about Scientology and The Unbreakable Miss Lovely will not disappoint. It is an extraordinary story of terrible things done to a woman who did not deserve them and shines a light into the darkest corner of the history of the Church of Scientology. Tony has done a wonderful job with the narrative - the story reads like a thriller. This is an outstanding work of investigative authorship by a very fine journalist and I'm delighted Silvertail is to be his publisher."

Tony Ortega has written about Scientology as a journalist for nearly 20 years, and began working with Paulette Cooper about her life story while he was still at the Voice. Ortega appears in Alex Gibney's HBO-produced documentary about Scientology, Going Clear, which premieres at the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah on January 25, and he will be in attendance.

Silvertail bought world rights directly from the author and will publish in paperback and ebook in May 2015 in the US and the UK.

http://www.broadwayworld.com/bwwbooks/article/Title-Art-Cover-Revealed-for-Tony-Ortegas-Upcoming-Explosive-Scientology-Expose-20150110

http://www.mediabistro.com/fishbowlny/tony-ortega-paulette-cooper-silvertail-books_b238700


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on March 23, 2015, 02:28:46 PM
                                                                      Twenty upcoming books on Scientology
Twenty upcoming books on Scientology.

Obviously omits Tony Orega's book due out in May.

From Incredulicide on WWP: https://whyweprotest.net/threads/twe...tology.124766/

* * * * * BEGIN QUOTATION * * * * *

I decided when this watchlist of books we're waiting on release dates for reached twenty, I'd create a thread about them.
Speculate on which ones will be published first, or whether some will be at all :cool:

Untitled book by Jesse Prince about Hubbard's last years
Untitled autobiography by Hana Whitfield
Untitled book by Steve Cannane about the history of Scientology in Australia
Untitled autobiography by Leah Remini
Untitled book by Jason Barclay
Untitled memoir by Jacqueline Olivier as Principal of New Village Leadership Academy (Study Tech)
Untitled book by Marc Headley, in addition to…
“The Greatest Good” by Marc Headley
“A Sucker Born Every Session: My Misadventures in $cientology” by Skip Press
“The Final Fall: Mixing Allah, Jesus and Xenu” by Leila Wills
“Hollywood Babylon III” by Kenneth Anger
“Clear and Beyond” by Mark Rathbun
“Roller Coaster Out Of Hell: My Escape from Narconon, Scientology's Drug Rehab” by David Love
“Son of Scientology: Dad, L Ron and Me” by Peter Jukes
“Scientology: A Walk into Darkness” by Glenn Samuels
“Scientology: Pre and Post Operating” by Frank Edwin Pate
“Swim To Get Out” by J.Marius Jeanpierre
“Waking Reason: the Science and Art of Persuasion” by Jon Atack
“Who's the Best?” by Mark Tordai
“Gullible's Travels” by John Duignan



* * * * * END QUOTATION * * * * *


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on May 09, 2015, 08:23:51 AM
                                       Merrell Vannier Outs Scientology Secrets, Leads Call For David Miscavige Resignation

Merrell Vannier reveals secrets of church takeover and absolute control by David Miscavige in fascinating exposé, Arrows in the Dark.

Scientology has always been a high profile religion. This is especially true in Clearwater, FL where after years of construction, the church owns the largest building in the city. Prominent practitioners of the religion also frequent the city, raising its profile. There are many secrets about its history most people – including Scientologists – don’t KNOW. Until now.

Though it reads like a JOHN Le Carre spy thriller, Arrows in the Dark is a true story about one of the fight for survival of one world’s most fascinating religions. Vannier makes many shocking revelations about his work as an undercover agent for the church in Clearwater in the 1970s. He explains the surprising reasons behind the purpose of his missions, as well as his DESIRE but ultimate decision to not cooperate with local authorities and civil litigants after his cover was blown......

http://www.theglobaldispatch.com/merrell-vannier-outs-scientology-secrets-leads-call-for-david-miscavige-resignation-68780/

https://www.facebook.com/ArrowsintheDark


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on May 12, 2015, 09:04:50 AM
                                                                          MISS LOVELY        
Scientology’s First ‘Victim’


L. Ron Hubbard called her a bitch, the FBI found files on her in its raids: The story of Scientology’s most famous critic.
“That bitch Paulette Cooper!”


http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2015/05/11/scientology-s-first-victim.html


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on May 24, 2015, 03:12:44 PM
                                                         Humanist Society Talk: Scientology

updated: May 22, 2015, 11:26 AM
By Robert Bernstein

Scientology was the topic of the May Humanist Society talk. Back in the 1960s the writer Paulette Cooper had researched and written about Scientology. And suffered greatly for doing so.

Journalist Tony Ortega has just written a book "The Unbreakable Miss Lovely: How the Church of Scientology Tried to Destroy Paulette Cooper". Both Paulette and Tony spoke to a packed event. Many Tony Ortega fans came from out of town.

https://www.edhat.com/site/tidbit.cfm?nid=153280


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on May 27, 2015, 08:46:36 AM
                                            ‘Arrows in the Dark’ by Merrell Vannier Exposes Truth About Scientology

Added by Douglas Cobb on May 25, 2015.
Saved under Book Reviews, Entertainment, Headlines
Tags: Arrows in the Dark, book review, church of scientology, merrell vannier

Read more at http://guardianlv.com/2015/05/arrows-in-the-dark-by-merrell-vannier-exposes-truth-about-scientology/#XUpeFh3pvETcek8K.99


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on May 27, 2015, 04:44:07 PM
                                             ‘Arrows in the Dark’ by Merrell Vannier Exposes Truth About Scientology

Read more at http://guardianlv.com/2015/05/arrows-in-the-dark-by-merrell-vannier-exposes-truth-about-scientology/#xB1mLxwKPu07mF0m.99


Just a different link in case the above one is down.


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on May 29, 2015, 08:15:21 AM
                                      Palm Beach Socialite Paulette Cooper: Scientologists Tried to Kill Me, And It’s All In a New Book!

http://www.gossipextra.com/2015/05/27/paulette-cooper-palm-beach-scientology-tried-to-kill-her-4845/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on June 25, 2015, 07:49:36 PM
                                                    Russell Miller Interview   Author of Bare Faced Messiah.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SdkZaoPCdmg

 23 minutes 17 seconds


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on June 26, 2015, 03:14:57 PM
                                                Scientology critics bringing book tour to Clearwater

CLEARWATER — Paulette Cooper is a legendary name among people who watch the Church of Scientology....

http://www.tampabay.com/news/scientology/scientology-critics-bringing-book-tour-to-clearwater/2235111


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on July 02, 2015, 06:56:35 PM
                                             Scientology Leader David Miscavige's Father to Pen Tell-All Book

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/bookmark/scientology-leader-david-miscaviges-father-806173


             Father of Church of Scientology leader David Miscavige to write tell-all about estranged son titled 'If He Dies, He Dies'

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3147308/Father-Church-Scientology-leade.html#ixzz3enJuXa3B
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on July 22, 2015, 02:47:52 AM
                                     Palm Beach woman at center of explosive new book, 'The Unbreakable Miss Lovely'

http://www.sun-sentinel.com/local/palm-beach/boca-raton/fl-brf-church-0715-20150720-story.html#page=1


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on July 22, 2015, 08:09:26 PM
                                                Author of book on Scientology to visit Austin Saturday

http://books.blog.austin360.com/2015/07/20/author-of-book-on-scientology-to-visit-austin-saturday/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on September 01, 2015, 06:27:58 AM
                                        Re: Upcoming Swedish tv Sep 2nd 2015 - and much more!


Mariette Lindstein posts to Facebook that her book has now been reviewed in Dagens Nyheter, the biggest morning paper. To even be mentioned on their culture page is something, especially when you are a new author on a small publishing company, and to then be praised is even more cool. 

The story is constructed in the way a cult works: at first, mostly harmless, and then it becomes more and more exciting, like a strong thrilller.
I don't see it online yet, but I imagine it will be there later.

Some time ago, she was also interviewed for Filter, an ambitious literary magazine. "The book is a small fuck you to them" It's not available for free, you can buy it here: http://magasinetfilter.se/magasin/2015/45/boken-ar-ett-litet-fuck-you-till-dem

In the program for the very large book fair in Gothenburg next month (about 100,000 visitors in total during four days) I see that she is going to make appearances. http://www.bokmassan.se/sv/program/arets-medverkande/?person=113253

http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?40186-Upcoming-Swedish-tv-Sep-2nd-2015/page2


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on October 27, 2015, 07:12:56 AM
                                      The Truth Rundown:

Stories of violence, intimidation and control in the world of Scientology Kindle Edition

by The staff of the Tampa Bay Times (Author, Editor)

http://www.amazon.com/Truth-Rundown-violence-intimidation-Scientology-ebook/dp/B013UWYHAI/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1445730838&sr=8-1&keywords=truth+rundown


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on December 13, 2015, 07:06:53 AM
                    Announced at the Bunker this morning:

                                                         Bare-Faced Messiah Now in Paperback!


http://tonyortega.org/2015/12/12/more-leaked-video-watch-scientology-welcome-2007-a-year-david-miscavige-would-regret/

Humfrey Hunter of Silvertail Books put Bare-Faced Messiah back in print in 2014, 27 years after its first publication. Russell Miller’s epic biography of L. Ron Hubbard is, for our money, the finest book in the Scientology field, and we can’t recommend it highly enough.

Now, Humfrey has let us know that he’s put Bare-Faced Messiah in paperback, and it’s now available at Amazon. Pick up your copy in time for Christmas!   http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1909269360?keywords=russell%20miller%20silvertail&qid=1449845096&ref_=sr_1_2&sr=8-2


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on December 29, 2015, 05:36:35 AM
                                        Rock Slam, by Sosumi Starr, a novel inspired by recovery from Scientology

    Rock Slam, by Sosumi Starr, a novel inspired by recovery from Scientology.

    Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Rock-Slam-cult-novel-Needles-ebook/dp/B019P930YY/




    Rock Slam: a cult novel (Eye of Needles Book 1) Kindle Edition

    by Sosumi Starr (Author)

    Kindle $3.99

    Three women lost to humanity huddle together on the chill Oregon coast. If they are to heal each other’s fractured lives, they must heed the lesson imposed by a sinister crag rising from the sea.

    A fictional book based on a true story, Rock Slam is one woman’s biography of pain and bliss, providing insight into families consumed by cults and forever scarred by evil. Through the blend of true life horror and crime, the workings of a cult and the minds of some captives may be understood.

    The effects of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Stockholm Syndrome, and fractured personality occurring as a result of cult involvement are explored.

    Product Details

    File Size: 2242 KB
    Print Length: 136 pages
    Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
    Publisher: Liber Sol Press; 1 edition (December 21, 2015)
    Publication Date: December 21, 2015
    Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
    Language: English
    ASIN: B019P930YY
    Text-to-Speech: Enabled
    X-Ray: Not Enabled
    Word Wise: Not Enabled
    Lending: Enabled
    Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled




    ************************************************** ******************************

    Sosumi Starr's Smashword Profile

    https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/sosumi

    Sosumi Starr

    Biography

    Sosumi wanders the universe seeking to right injustices through revealing truths kept hidden under oppression.

    Books

    Rock Slam by Sosumi Starr

    Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 45,090. Language: English. Published: December 22, 2015 by House of Lit. Categories: Nonfiction » Religion and Spirituality » Scientology, Nonfiction » True Crime » Kidnapping, abduction, hostage taking

    Three women lost to humanity huddle together on the chill Oregon coast. If they are to heal each other’s fractured lives, they must heed the lesson imposed by a sinister crag rising from the sea. Based on a true story, Rock Slam uses metaphor and narrative to relate one woman’s biography of pain and bliss, providing insight into families consumed by cults and forever scarred by evil.

    EDITED TO ADD:

    http://www.amazon.com/Rock-Slam-cult...dp/B019P930YY/



    EDITED AGAIN TO ADD INTRODUCTION AND SAMPLE FROM SMASHWORDS

    http://rtf-ebooks.com/_/_/600032/rock-slam

    Rock Slam

    a cult novel

    Eye of Needles, Book I

    sosumi starr

    © Copyright 2015 Sosumi Starr

    All Rights Reserved

    SMASHWORDS EDITION

    Smashwords Edition License Notes

    This ebook is licensed for your personal enjoyment only. This ebook may not be resold or given away to other people. If you would like to share this book with another person, please purchase an additional copy for each recipient. If you’re reading this book and did not purchase it, or it was not purchased for your use only, then please return it to Smashwords.com and purchase your own copy. Thank you for respecting the hard work of this author.

    This book is a work of fiction based on a true story. All characters and events are fictitious, except those which are the true experiences of the ex-cult member. Names have been changed to protect the innocent. No part, excerpt, image, or passage of this book or book cover may be reproduced or copied by anyone (including online libraries), in any medium, except for those expressly and explicitly allowed in writing from the author or publisher. For permission, contact zephyrlib@gmail.com.

    Book Description

    Three women lost to humanity huddle together on the chill Oregon coast. If they are to heal each other’s fractured lives, they must heed the lesson imposed by a sinister crag rising from the sea.

    Based on a true story, Rock Slam uses metaphor and narrative to relate one woman’s biography of pain and bliss, providing insight into families consumed by cults and forever scarred by evil. Through the fictionalized blend of true life horror and crime, the workings of a cult and the minds of some captives may be understood.
    The effects of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Stockholm Syndrome, and fractured personality occurring as a result of cult involvement are explored.

    for Warrior

    for the survivors and their families,
    who could never understand

    for Tim, for staying as long as he could

    for my grandchildren,
    who otherwise would never know the truth

    for my parents, who endured

    and most of all
    for my lost children

    In life, little happens by chance, and most bad hands we’re dealt are the consequence of our actions, which are shaped by our wisdom and our ignorance. In my experience, survival depends on hoping for the best while recognizing that disaster is more likely and that it can’t be averted if it can’t be imagined.
    —Odd Thomas/Dean Koontz from Deeply Odd

    You never wanted your children anyway.
    —M. George

    He with no spine has a snake for a backbone.
    — Riley Hill’s Chinese Fortune Cookie

    For those of you seduced by the need to follow God, to seek those greater spiritual states of being, who said enlightenment is not cruel? Who said Truth and Beauty bring Peace? All truth cannot lie, nor lies exist without truth. This is the Tao. Follow me through my tale so you can choose your path more wisely.
    –The Tented Woman

    Contents

    Introduction

    1. Suicide

    2. Resurrection

    3. Journals

    4. Born Again Bums

    5. Hidden Things

    6. Secrets of the Sea

    7. Living Without Mirrors

    8. Hopes and Dreams

    9. Imprint/In Print

    Foreword

    Chapter One The Road to Total Freedom

    The Emotional Tone Scale

    Suppressive Person

    Tone 40

    Chapter Two Beyond My Wildest Dreams

    10. Spooky Stories

    11. Don’t Think, Just Do

    Chapter Three The Highest Honor

    12. Goodbye Yellow Brick Road

    Chapter Four The Silent Scream

    13. Wrongful Death

    14. Freedom

    15. Have I Got a Bridge to Sell You!

    Suggested Reading Material

    For Families and Ex-cult Members

    For Those Recovering from Cult Abuses

    For Those Still Trapped and Their Families

    Coming soon from Sosumi Starr

    Introduction

    Have you known an innocent and delightful person who suddenly turned and became someone you could not fathom? Have you wondered what goes through the mind of someone in a cult? Do you assert that you would never be susceptible to becoming involved in a cult? That only weak or vulnerable people get caught in their grips? Do you have a family member who is lost to a group or practice that you cannot understand? Do you grieve for what you gave up, are you trying to recover? Are you a survivor? Or a victim? If so, this book might be for you.

    But if you live on the thin surface of life, believing only in the news, your church, the American Dream, apple pie, and that nothing, nothing, can ever shatter that; or if you are already captured by the mind-control techniques of your favorite cult and refuse to hear anything offered that does not come to you via your founder, your leader, your interpreter of God; you probably will not understand the insights this book offers.

    Perhaps the truth writhes, buried under a layer of denial that terrible things could happen in the bright and shining USA—or your country—condoned by government, disregarded by law, and leaving the victim shunned by the general populace; the normal people. Can post traumatic stress disorder last a lifetime? A lot has been written for and about PTSD as regards service men and women, but not so much about others who have suffered the shocks and harrowing misadventures that bring their lives and livelihoods to their knees.

    Chances are you will not like this story. But if you’re curious about true crime, what goes through the minds of cult members, or what can happen to those who are innocent and trusting in countries around the world, and if you can stand up to the truth that it’s happening every day in your neighborhood, you may be well-armed to read this book.

    This book is a work of fiction based on a true story. It provides peeks into the workings of a mind trapped in a cult that, quite ironically, offers to free the planet of insanity, war, and crime. It is about the pain of being human and innocent. It is a trek to the dark side of what well-intentioned people can do to one another. Written in a literary style of plain English without much cult jargon, the author can only hope it helps at least one person to make a better choice.

http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?41051-Rock-Slam-by-Sosumi-Starr-a-novel-inspired-by-recovery-from-Scientology


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on March 18, 2016, 07:45:05 AM
                                                                Tom's best friend

Dear Gossips,

What’s your answer to the question: Who is Tom Cruise’s best friend?

Probably David Miscavige, right? David Miscavige’s father, Ron, is coming out with a book called Ruthless: Scientology, My Son David Miscavige, and Me. It’s due in May. And father and son do not have a good relationship. Ron quit the Church in 2012. So now he’s, presumably, telling all of his son’s secrets. But let’s be real – we’re not interested in David’s secrets, are we? We are interested in his best friend’s secrets.

But David hasn’t always been Tom’s BFF. Tom’s turned 54 this year. When he was 24 years old, his best friend was Emilio Estevez and also Sean Penn but they weren’t hanging out that much anymore because Sean got married to Madonna. And when he was 24 years old he was telling all of this to Cameron Crowe for Interview Magazine. Go back and read that article with 30 years of hindsight. It’s FASCINATING. So much of it is. Including the part where he talks about watching the rushes every day. You hear all the time how actors can’t bear to see their own performances. Tom Cruise, evidently, has never had that problem. Is it vanity? Or just a lot of self-confidence?


http://www.laineygossip.com/David-Miscaviges-father--Ron--releasing-book-called-Ruthless-Scientology--My-Son-David-Miscavige--and-Me-and-Intro-for-March-17--2016/43354


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on March 19, 2016, 07:25:07 AM
                                             A 'Ruthless' Scientology tell-all is coming

http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/books/2016/03/17/ruthless-scientology-tell-all-coming/81913678/

http://www.usmagazine.com/celebrity-news/news/scientology-leader-david-miscaviges-dad-ron-to-speak-out-in-new-interview-w167540

http://abcnews.go.com/Press_Release/ron-miscavige-father-scientology-leader-david-miscavige-speaks/story?id=37715704

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-news/father-church-scientology-leader-writes-7579036


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on May 01, 2016, 05:43:42 PM
                                                Author Robin Gaby Fisher working on a book about a woman’s struggle with Scientology

    Author Robin Gaby Fisher working on a book about a woman’s struggle with the Church of Scientology.

    The Vermont Standard: Woodstock Author Captures Tragedies In Bestsellers

    http://www.thevermontstandard.com/2016/04/woodstock-author-captures-tragedies-in-bestsellers/

    * * * * * BEGIN EXCERPT * * * * *

    Woodstock Author Captures Tragedies In Bestsellers

    By Virginia Dean, Standard Correspondent

    Part-time local resident Robin Gaby Fisher has been a working journalist for over 30 years. From the slow painful healing process of two young male students critically burned in a dormitory fire to the mass shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newton, Connecticut, Fisher has captured some of America’s worst tragedies in the 20th and 21st centuries.

    A two-time Pulitzer Prize finalist for feature writing and the New York Times bestselling author of three books, “After the Fire: A True Story of Friendship and Survival,” “The Boys of the Dark: A Story of Betrayal and Redemption in the Deep South” and “The Woman Who Wasn’t There,” Fisher’s narrative journalism conveys a deep respect and compassion for those involved.

    In fact, Fisher even writes about those who fabricate their involvement in such tragedies.

    Teaming up with filmmaker Angelo J. Guglielmo Jr., for example, Fisher tells the story of Tania Head who lived a lie for years as she pretended to be a survivor of the World Trade Center attacks who lost her husband in the same attack and founded and led the World Trade Center Survivors’ Network until she was eventually exposed as a fraud.

    “The story is one of the most audacious and bewildering quests for acclaim in recent memory, one that poses fascinating questions about the essence of morality and the human need for connection at any cost,” according to the GoodReads website.

    Currently the director of the Journalism Program at Rutgers University’s Newark campus, Fisher is working on a book for Penguin/Putnam about a woman’s struggle with the Church of Scientology. It will be released next spring.

    * * * * * END EXCERPT * * * * *



Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on May 13, 2016, 05:35:53 AM
                                  The Unbreakable Miss Lovely looks at one of Scientology’s most formidable foes

‘Miss Lovely’ gets the A.V. Club treatment

Nathan Rabin has a great thing going at the A.V. Club, The Onion’s influential culture website. He reviews books on his own schedule, not on a publisher’s. And he has a strong interest in Scientology, which has led him to review books like Leah Remini’s Troublemaker.

And now, to our complete surprise, Rabin has chosen to write about our book, The Unbreakable Miss Lovely: How the Church of Scientology tried to destroy Paulette Cooper. We’re humbled, and very pleased that he seemed to have enjoyed the book so much. It’s great to see someone as inspired as we were about Paulette’s amazing life and her triumph against long odds.

The A.V. Club has a huge readership. We hope that some of Rabin’s many fans manage to find their way to our underground lair and can join us as we keep our daily watch on Scientology news.

Tony Ortega.

http://www.avclub.com/article/unbreakable-miss-lovely-looks-one-scientologys-mos-234773


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on July 13, 2016, 05:26:54 AM
                               NEW BOOK - Fair Game: The Incredible Untold Story of Scientology in Australia, by Steve Cannane

Harper Collins Publishers Australia - Fair Game: The Incredible Untold Story of Scientology in Australia

http://www.harpercollins.com.au/9780733331329/

Fair Game: The Incredible Untold Story of Scientology in Australia

by Steve Cannane

On Sale: 19/09/2016

Format: Paperback

About the Book

As astonishing as it is compelling - Steve Cannane's extraordinary insight into Scientology in Australia is investigative journalism at its very best. From Rugby League players trying to improve their game, to Hollywood superstars and the depressed sons of media moguls, Scientology has recruited its share of famous Australians. Less known is that Australia was the first place to ban Scientology, or that Scientology spies helped expose the Chelmsford Deep Sleep Scandal. Numerous Australians have held senior posts in the organisation only to fall foul of the top brass and lose their families as a result. Based on years of interviews and research, Walkley Award-winning journalist Steve Cannane tells for the first time the fascinating story of Australia's vital involvement with this powerful, secretive and punitive cult.

Product Details

ISBN: 9780733331329
ISBN 10: 0733331327
Imprint: ABC Books - AU
On Sale: 09/19/2016
Pages: 320
List Price: 32.99 AUD
BISAC1: Literature & literary studies / Reportage & collected journalism


* * * * * END QUOTATION * * * * *

http://www.angusrobertson.com.au/books/fair-game-the-incredible-untold-story-of-scientology-in-australia-steve-cannane/p/9780733331329

http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?42219-NEW-BOOK-Fair-Game-The-Incredible-Untold-Story-of-Scientology-in-Australia


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on July 19, 2016, 08:14:47 AM
                                    NEW book: Blown: A Novel Set in the World of the Scientology Sea Org

    NEW book: Blown: A Novel Set in the World of the Scientology Sea Org

    The novel is based on a true story. There is a planned sequel entitled SP.

    Official website - Read Online: https://lhbbooks.com/home/

    On Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Blown-Lauren-Halsted-Burroughs-ebook/dp/B01FWQOX9U/

    Amazon version of the book is 218 pages long.

    Article on Scientology Books and Media: https://scicrit.wordpress.com/2016/07/18/blown-a-novel-set-in-the-world-of-the-sea-org/



    * * * * * BEGIN AMAZON SUMMARY * * * * *

    At the tender ages of only three and five, sisters Amory and Riley are abandoned by their mother at the Church of Scientology in Hollywood, California.

    For sixteen long years Amory does what she’s told, following Church rules and regulations about every aspect of her life. Yet, while working in the Sea Org—the Church’s administrative organization comprised of the most dedicated members—Amory experiences for the first time a stirring yearning for freedom unlike anything she’s ever known.

    When Riley admits that she’s pregnant, Amory knows she must do something and swallows a handful of pills in a desperate attempt to escape. When she wakes up, the Church places her in a strict ethics “rehabilitation” program that isolates her from family and friends.

    As Amory becomes more convinced of her need to leave the Church, she struggles to disconnect from those around her and free herself from the ties that hold her to the only home she has.

    Will Amory find the courage she needs to escape the manipulation and controlling demands of the only world she’s ever known?

    Based on true-life events, Blown represents the first novel depicting life inside the repressive confines of the Church of Scientology.

    * * * * * END AMAZON SUMMARY * * * * *

    * * * * * BEGIN AMAZON ABOUT THE AUTHOR * * * * *

    Lauren Halsted Burroughs teaches English at Cuyamaca Community College in San Diego, California.

    Burroughs began her writing career as an editorial assistant at Surfing Girl Magazine and has worked as a journalist, grant writer, online content writer, and in research, and academic publishing. This is her debut novel.

    * * * * * END AMAZON ABOUT THE AUTHOR * * * * *

Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails
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                      In the "About Blown" tab on the web site, it says that the book was based on interviews by the author with a friend who had been in.

http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?42294-NEW-book-Blown-A-Novel-Set-in-the-World-of-the-Scientology-Sea-Org


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on September 14, 2016, 09:01:23 AM
                                                      Fair Game: The Incredible Untold Story of Scientology in Australia

by Steve Cannane

On Sale: 19/09/2016

About the Book

As astonishing as it is compelling - Steve Cannane's extraordinary insight into Scientology in Australia is investigative journalism at its very best. From Rugby League players trying to improve their game, to Hollywood superstars and the depressed sons of media moguls, Scientology has recruited its share of famous Australians. Less known is that Australia was the first place to ban Scientology, or that Scientology spies helped expose the Chelmsford Deep Sleep Scandal. Numerous Australians have held senior posts in the organisation only to fall foul of the top brass and lose their families as a result. Based on years of interviews and research, Walkley Award-winning journalist Steve Cannane tells for the first time the fascinating story of Australia's vital involvement with this powerful, secretive and punitive cult.
Product Details

    ISBN: 9780733331329
    ISBN 10: 0733331327
    Imprint: ABC Books - AU
    On Sale: 09/19/2016
    Pages: 384
    List Price: 32.99 AUD
    BISAC1: Literature & literary studies / Reportage & collected journalism



http://www.harpercollins.com.au/9780733331329/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on November 18, 2016, 06:23:16 AM
                               Available 11/17/16: New book by James R. Lewis: Handbook of Scientology.

Interestingly so far I see it listed only on the Amazon UK website. The Amazon US website lists it as unavailable. The Amazon UK website states the book can be delivered in the US.

Amazon UK: Handbook of Scientology

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Handbook-Scientology-Handbooks-Contemporary-Religion/dp/9004328718/


Posted by
CommunicatorIC  on Ex Scientology message board





Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on January 16, 2017, 02:39:20 AM
                               Naked in the Spotlight: My Life with Sex, Singing and Scientology



https://www.amazon.com/Naked-Spotlight-Life-Singing-Scientology-ebook/dp/B01MZ54CDB/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q76F0qVuq94


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on February 08, 2017, 10:41:05 PM
                     
                             The Scientology Murders: A Dead Detective Novel Hardcover – April 4, 2017


by William Heffernan (Author)
See all 5 formats and editions

    Hardcover
    $27.95
    1 New from $27.95
    Paperback
    $15.95
    1 New from $15.95
    Audio CD
    $59.99
    1 New from $59.99
    Digital
    —

https://www.amazon.com/Scientology-Murders-Dead-Detective-Novel/dp/1617755354/

http://www.publishersweekly.com/978-1-61775-535-4



Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on March 02, 2017, 06:18:01 AM
                           Upcoming book: Escaping Scientology, by Karen [Schless] Pressley.

Escaping Scientology 2017: My Upcoming Book

https://escapingscientology2017.com/2017/02/26/my-upcoming-book/

* * * * * BEGIN EXCERPT * * * * *

I made my third and final escape from Scientology’s gated, guarded International Management headquarters near Los Angeles in 1998. The doors to my world of Scientology friends and loved ones promptly slammed shut. I experienced firsthand Scientology’s cruel policy of disconnection when Peter Schless, my husband of 21 years, disconnected from me over my choice to leave the Sea Org and Scientology.

There are many ways a person who gets involved in Scientology can fall down a rabbit hole without seeing it coming, like we did. Reflecting on my twenty-something state of mind when Peter Schless and I took a detour from building our lives together with careers in the Hollywood entertainment industry to journey into Scientology, is a perplexing experience for the woman I am now.

Since I became a critic of Scientology, I’ve had experiences that shouldn’t happen in America, though many other critics’ experiences have been far worse than mine. In 2000, I attempted to tell my story in my first book, Chasing After the Wind (Broadman & Holman, Nashville), and my second, Escaping Scientology, in 2006 (New Hope Publishers, Birmingham). Both times, Scientology officials used threats and lies to overwhelm my publishers to cancel the book releases (see Chapter, Leverage). In those days, the Church of Scientology International was infamous for being a highly litigious organization with a bottomless money pit used to squash opponents. Unwilling to engage in the bloodsport of legal battles with Scientology, my publishers apologized to me and shelved my books. Had they asked, Why did Scientology not want my story to be told, or What would I reveal that could affect the organization’s reputation, they could have potentially helped a lot of people from getting involved in this cult, or could have helped many families to get their loved ones out, had they released those books.,,,


http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?43562-Upcoming-book-Escaping-Scientology-by-Karen-Schless-Pressley


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on March 29, 2017, 09:18:36 PM
                        10 of the Most Shocking Books About Scientology

https://www.popsugar.com/entertainment/Books-About-Scientology-43349431


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on June 26, 2017, 12:42:46 AM
                     NEW upcoming book

 - Commodore's Messenger: A Child Adrift in the Scientology Sea Organization, by Janis Gillham Grady.

http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?44047-Janis-Gillham-Grady-****New-Book****-with-nothing-held-back


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on July 27, 2017, 07:58:29 AM
                  NEW book - The Defector: After 20 years in Scientology, by Robert Dam.

The author's website indicates the book was first published in Danish in 2011. Amazon states the English edition was published on January 21, 2017.

NOTE: The Kindle edition is free if one is a member of Kindle Unlimited.

https://www.amazon.com/DEFECTOR-After-20-years-Scientology-ebook/dp/B01N4QV7ZK/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=szohQyvYa6o


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on September 17, 2017, 07:19:39 AM
                                  Escaping Scientology: An Insider's True Story

http://escapingscientology.com/
by Karen Schless Pressley

Escaping Scientology is a candid and chilling true story of a woman who breaks free of Scientology's grip and gains a whole new life once she meets the Living God. From serving in the higher levels of the Church of Scientology, author Karen Schless Pressley reveals the deception of this belief system and speaks out courageously against the lure of this false religion. Kare ...more


https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/580025.Escaping_Scientology

http://sharpens.blogspot.co.nz/2008/07/karen-pressley-escaping-scientology.html

http://www.bpnews.net/21407/after-spending-half-of-her-life-in-scientology-she-found-truth-and-freedom-in-jesus-christ

http://www.forum.exscn.net/threads/upcoming-book-escaping-scientology-by-karen-schless-pressley.43562/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on October 07, 2017, 05:56:44 AM

                                  Over the Edge: A Pawn in the Scientology Money Machine Kindle Edition
by Kay Rowe (Author)

In a billion years I never thought I'd get involved in a cult, let alone sign a billion year contract with one and stick with it for 37 years.
The most oft questions I have been asked are "Why did you get involved in the first place?" and "What took you so long to finally get out?"
I am confident that you will find the answers to both of these questions and many more in the pages within. This is not just my memoir, but a story that needs to be told of harsh abuse, medical neglect and voracious greed all under the banner of a religion which claims to be saving this planet and the universe. From my early days getting involved in Scientology in Santa Barbara to joining the elite Sea Organization and slaving for pennies a day, there are no stones left unturned. I was a pawn in the Church of Scientology's money making machine and this is my story.
I reside in Omaha, NE, surrounded by Wonderful friends. In addition to being a Writer, I am a Realtor and Wealth Advisor. My passion to help people enjoy a higher quality of life recently landed me a position as a Rep for a company that provides Mobile Dental Care for the elderly in Skilled Nursing Facilities.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0765SXMBP/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1507260050&sr=1-1


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on November 11, 2017, 06:52:35 PM
                      Steve Cannane: Fair Game: The Incredible Story of Scientology in Australia     
                                          shortlisted for the Walkley Book Award

Baird, a columnist with Fairfax Media, is joined on the list by ABC Europe correspondent Steve Cannane for his in-depth picture of Scientology, Fair Game: The Incredible Story of Scientology in Australia, and ....

....The three-book shortlist was culled from a nine-book longlist that included books investigating crime, gambling politics and drugs.

http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/books/julia-bairds-life-of-queen-victoria-shortlisted-for-the-walkley-book-award-20171110-gzj1gh.html



Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on January 26, 2018, 06:14:52 AM
                  September 22, 2018: Scientology Book Convention, in Las Vegas, Nevada.

http://www.forum.exscn.net/threads/scientology-book-convention.45082/

https://tonyortega.org/2018/01/24/the-battle-of-portland-how-scientology-turned-a-nightmare-court-verdict-into-a-major-victory/#comment-3724970566


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on March 09, 2018, 07:36:17 AM
                       A fresh start: Former Scientology member shares her memoir with Yuba Lit

https://www.theunion.com/entertainment/a-fresh-start-former-scientology-member-shares-her-memoir-with-yuba-lit/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on March 15, 2018, 08:04:14 PM
                         
                              A Mother's Heartbreak: How Scientology Destroyed My Family

 Perfect Paperback

– May 1, 2018

by Lori Hodgson (Author)

https://www.amazon.com/Mothers-Heartbreak-Scientology-Destroyed-Family/dp/1945271957/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1520708832&sr=1-1&keywords=lori+hodgson


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on April 09, 2018, 07:31:11 AM
                  F&M professor reflects on the 7 years she spent in the Church of Scientology

https://lancasteronline.com/features/entertainment/f-m-professor-reflects-on-the-years-she-spent-in/article_6e5cf638-39d8-11e8-8bcb-2bbbd4b9d9cf.html


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on May 03, 2018, 09:19:17 PM
                              Nevada County author celebrates new memoir chronicling Scientology experiences

https://www.theunion.com/news/news-briefs/nevada-county-author-celebrates-new-memoir-chronicling-scientology-experiences/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on May 20, 2018, 07:13:59 AM
 

                                          "Fractured Journey," a Book Commercial   

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=90&v=0TCfkQGWhms                 


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on August 12, 2018, 07:36:59 AM
                  NEW book by Nathan Rich about Scientology -- Scythe Tleppo: My Survival of a Cult, Abandonment, Addiction and Homelessness.

Now available for pre-order on Amazon. Although the available Amazon link is for the Kindle edition, hardcover and paperback editions will be available in October.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07GC685LL/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on August 17, 2018, 07:56:15 AM
            8/22/18: Book Club Event for A Mother’s Heartbreak: How Scientology Destroyed My Family by Lori Hodgson.

Book Club Event for A Mother's Heartbreack: How Scientology Destroyed My Family, by Lori Hodgson, on Wednesday August 22, 2018 at 7 pm. Recycle Book Club, Orchard Valley Coffee, 349 E. Campbell Ave., Campbell, CA.

http://www.forum.exscn.net/threads/8-22-18-book-event-for-a-mother%E2%80%99s-heartbreak-how-scientology-destroyed-my-family-by-lori-hodgson.48198/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on August 21, 2018, 03:53:21 PM
                               'Flunk' a strange true story of conflict, spiritual desire

http://themercury.com/features/books_and_writing/flunk-a-strange-true-story-of-conflict-spiritual-desire/article_e3247307-1483-5ba4-962f-b7e0b08c875c.html


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on September 06, 2018, 08:21:50 AM
                      Ex-Scientologist Michelle LeClair Says Church Officials Humiliated Her After She Came Out as Gay

https://people.com/books/michelle-leclair-scientology-humiliated-came-out-gay/

https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/535093/perfectly-clear-by-michelle-leclair-and-robin-gaby-fisher/9781101991169/


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on September 14, 2018, 10:53:20 PM
            NEW Book - The Expert Witness: My Life at the Top of Scientology, by Jesse Prince

Paperback: $19.99
https://www.amazon.com/Expert-Witness-Life-Top-Scientology/dp/1725992639/

Kindle: $9.99. Free with Kindle Unlimited.
https://www.amazon.com/Expert-Witness-Life-Top-Scientology-ebook/dp/B07HBDQH7P/

* * * * * BEGIN INTRODUCTION * * * * *

A memoir of a life that became involved in a secret society masquerading as a religion in Hollywood that practices magic and domination. This body of work could have been about you if you were contacted or chosen like I was. Buckle up and get ready to be changed in your thinking forever.

About the Author

Born on the south side of Chicago, the first son of a WWII U.S. Army veteran. Jesse began his education in the Chicago Catholic school system where he learned to speak Latin by the third grade good enough to perform the Mass ceremony in that language. Later, he attended Chicago Vocational High School. At the tender age of twenty-two Jesse started studying and living an alternative life style only afforded to people that have pledged their lives to someone or something. Jesse’s remaining education involved the painful process of learning his life was not his to give or pledge. He was already taken.

* * * * * END INTRODUCTION * * * * *

NOTE: The different number of pages for the paperback and Kindle editions is almost certainly due to the fact that Amazon uses an algorithm to calculate the number of pages for a Kindle edition. I am confident that the number of pages given the the paperback (i.e., 432 pages) is accurate and the correct number.

* * * * * BEGIN PAPERBACK INFORMATION * * * * *

Product details

Paperback: 432 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (September 13, 2018)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1725992639
ISBN-13: 978-1725992634
Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 1.1 x 8.5 inches
Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
Average Customer Review: Be the first to review this item
Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #14,005 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
#924 in Books > Biographies & Memoirs > Memoirs

* * * * * END PAPERBACK INFORMATION * * * * *

* * * * * BEGIN KINDLE INFORMATION * * * * *

Product details

File Size: 17670 KB
Print Length: 307 pages
Publisher: Prince Publishing (September 12, 2018)
Publication Date: September 12, 2018
Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
Language: English
ASIN: B07HBDQH7P
Text-to-Speech: Enabled
X-Ray: Not Enabled
Word Wise: Enabled
Lending: Enabled
Screen Reader: Supported
Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #28,625 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
#46 in Kindle Store > Kindle eBooks > Biographies & Memoirs > Leaders & Notable People > Religious
#178 in Books > Biographies & Memoirs > Leaders & Notable People > Religious
#359 in Kindle Store > Kindle eBooks > Biographies & Memoirs > Memoirs

* * * * * END KINDLE INFORMATION * * * * *


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on September 21, 2018, 01:49:47 PM
                                           BOOK REVIEW Perfectly Clear

by Lauren Emily Whalen
2018-09-19

http://www.windycitymediagroup.com/lgbt/BOOK-REVIEW-Perfectly-Clear/64138.html


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on September 26, 2018, 10:50:52 PM
                        The Lesbian Who Outed Scientology’s Homophobia

Michelle LeClair claims the Church of Scientology, which she gave around $5 million to as a member, viciously turned on her after she came out. The church denies her story.

https://www.thedailybeast.com/the-lesbian-who-outed-scientologys-homophobia


                                Woman describes bitter escape from ‘cult' of Scientology in new book

https://www.kiro7.com/news/trending-now/woman-describes-bitter-escape-from-cult-of-scientology-in-new-book/841420333
                                     


Title: Re: Books exposing the cult.
Post by: Ididntcomeback on October 08, 2018, 05:35:48 AM
                           NEW Book - Over the Edge: A Pawn in the Scientology Money Machine, by Kay Rowe.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0765SXMBP/

* * * * * BEGIN EXCERPT * * * * *

[​IMG]

Over the Edge: A Pawn in the Scientology Money Machine

by Kay Rowe (Author)

Kindle $9.99 to buy

In a billion years I never thought I'd get involved in a cult, let alone sign a billion year contract with one and stick with it for 37 years.

The most oft questions I have been asked are "Why did you get involved in the first place?" and "What took you so long to finally get out?"

I am confident that you will find the answers to both of these questions and many more in the pages within. This is not just my memoir, but a story that needs to be told of harsh abuse, medical neglect and voracious greed all under the banner of a religion which claims to be saving this planet and the universe. From my early days getting involved in Scientology in Santa Barbara to joining the elite Sea Organization and slaving for pennies a day, there are no stones left unturned. I was a pawn in the Church of Scientology's money making machine and this is my story.

I reside in Omaha, NE, surrounded by Wonderful friends. In addition to being a Writer, I am a Realtor and Wealth Advisor. My passion to help people enjoy a higher quality of life recently landed me a position as a Rep for a company that provides Mobile Dental Care for the elderly in Skilled Nursing Facilities.

Length: 284 pages
Word Wise: Enabled
Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled
Matchbook Price: $2.99

Product details
File Size: 814 KB
Print Length: 284 pages
Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
Publication Date: October 4, 2017
Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
Language: English
ASIN: B0765SXMBP
Text-to-Speech: Enabled
X-Ray: Not Enabled
Word Wise: Enabled
Lending: Enabled
Screen Reader: Supported

Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #8,065 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
#5 in Kindle Store > Kindle eBooks > Religion & Spirituality > Other Religions, Practices & Sacred Texts
#5 in Books > Religion & Spirituality > Other Religions, Practices & Sacred Texts > Scientology
#19 in Kindle Store > Kindle eBooks > Biographies & Memoirs > Leaders & Notable People > Religious


* * * * * END EXCERPT * * * * *