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Author Topic: John P. Capitalist has a blog  (Read 9438 times)
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« Reply #30 on: December 12, 2013, 06:13:39 PM »

                            Scientology Daily Digest: Wednesday, December 11, 2013

http://www.johnpcapitalist.com/uncategorized/scientology-daily-digest-wednesday-december-11-2013-2/
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« Reply #31 on: December 13, 2013, 05:56:17 PM »

                           Scientology Daily Digest: Thursday, December 12, 2013

Here’s the promised “science fiction double feature” since I couldn’t get a post out last night.

Most surprising news is that Devon Newman, former head of PR for Las Vegas Celebrity Centre, picked up in a bizarre plot with her roommate to kidnap and murder police, was allowed to cop a plea and walk out of court with a year probation.  See below for further details. This was entirely unexpected given the bail amounts involved and the statements of the police and the DA.  I still think her co-conspirator, a convicted pedophile with a long record, is not going to be so lucky.

Check out the rest of the “General Press” section as there are a number of interesting cult-related articles including an interview with PR powerhouse Pat Kingsley, who Tom Cruise fired in favor of his sister....

http://www.johnpcapitalist.com/scientology/daily-digest-december-12-2013/
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« Reply #32 on: December 18, 2013, 07:19:16 PM »

                                     An Offer You Just Can’t Refuse

http://www.johnpcapitalist.com/2013/12/an-offer-you-just-cant-refuse/
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« Reply #33 on: December 27, 2013, 06:13:51 AM »

                                 Work in Progress: Predictions for Scientology in 2014

http://www.johnpcapitalist.com/2013/12/work-in-progress-predictions-for-scientology-in-2014/
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« Reply #34 on: March 21, 2014, 03:34:25 PM »

                                                Back in the Saddle

I’m back.  This post gives the story of what happened, what I have in the pipeline, and invites you to contribute to the return of my blog...

http://www.johnpcapitalist.com/2014/03/back-in-the-saddle/
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« Reply #35 on: March 22, 2014, 05:59:47 PM »

                                         One Scenario for the End of Scientology

   March 21 2014

http://www.johnpcapitalist.com/2014/03/one-scenario-for-the-end-of-scientology/
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« Reply #36 on: March 26, 2014, 06:04:45 AM »

                               An Interesting Data Point on Sea Org Headcount and Revenue

 25th March 2014

http://www.johnpcapitalist.com/2014/03/an-interesting-data-point-on-sea-org-headcount-and-revenue/
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« Reply #37 on: June 09, 2014, 08:10:36 AM »


John P comments on Tony Ortega`s blog.


The desperation really shines through in this batch of funnies.

Actors: Get an Agent: Perhaps the most interesting thing about this is what's not said. The text says, "you have noticed that some of the most successful people in Hollywood study Scientology." But note that it doesn't name Cruise, Travolta, Alley or even Nancy Cartwright. Are they no longer actually giving the cult permission to use their names?

Washington DC event: The big lie is the 30,000 auditing sessions occurring per week. I doubt there are 30,000 auditing sessions occurring per week in all of Scientology, much less at the Super Power building. It would seem more reasonable to believe at most a tenth of that: 3,000 hours per week tops, and probably more like 300.

But the best part is the clumsy lie of Hubbard's about his Eagle Scout days, where he says of his quest to get a merit badge in photography:

A month and ten visits later he signed my card just to be rid of me, telling me that I’d never know anything about photography due to my exceptional stupidity.

This is rather abated by the fact that I just sold six pictures to the National Geography magazine.
First, he gets the name of the magazine wrong -- it's National Geographic. Second, even in the day, it was a significant win for a photographer to sell their work to that prestigious publication. Unlikely that a 12-year old would have a shot, particularly one who didn't know anything about photography. That, however, is the one true thing Hubbard said about himself -- he certainly didn't know anything about photography, given all those awful photographs he took to illustrate the Advance! magazine.

Clear Body, Clear Mind library scam: Note that the library donation scam has shrunk in its unit revenue. First, they sent out thousands of copies of The Basics at $3,000 per set. Next, it was the Ron-o-Pedia at $900 per set. Now it's two copies of a single book, which presumably would be about $50 or $100 per set in donations exacted from members. I wonder how many of the brainwashed would notice that if every library in the US has already received a copy of The Basics, there is not really any need to turn around and send them one of the books in that set a second time...

Postulates seminar: All those super powers you will get from that one single event sound pretty cool, especially the ability to undo unwanted postulates like "I have a mortgage that the bank has postulated that I pay every month." But one small marketing problem: they're offering a seminar for $170 that, at the very end, promises that you can "start operating as an OT right now!" In other words, he's saying that this one $170 event can save me the several hundred thousand dollars that I would otherwise have to spend on all the secret flying saucer and dead space cootie exorcism levels. Wonder how Miscavige will react if people start flocking to this seminar instead of forking out the big bucks...

Dallas Ideal Org event: The usual observations about camera angles to make it look like the event is really big apply. But the best part: what are they raising money for? Not a new building somewhere else this time, but uniforms for the staff. Nothing like advertising how miserable the staff are than to raise money so they can replace their worn-out uniforms that they can't afford to launder or replace on their own.

Silicon Valley Ideal Org flyers: Note that the only people that they can round up for this batch of mailers are various Feshbachs. Thankfully, in this one, Kannon Feshbach is not pregnant, as she was in the utterly hideous (but frightfully expensive painting) that Tony revealed in this article: http://tonyortega.org/2012/12/.... But interestingly, Cindy feels it necessary to tug on the heartstrings and bring her late husband Joe Feshbach into the ad. Why does that feel just a little tacky?

Florian Laplantif testimonial: Another inadvertantly true admission. Regarding all that "straight up and vertical" expansion he's witnessing at his local org and those tremendous wins, he says, "one realization is crystal clear: we are still not operating at the right orders of magnitude." That's something we critics would agree with: Scientology is going down the drain and is orders of magnitude smaller than the cult's hype says it is. Too bad this observation doesn't get ol' Florian to wake up and smell the reality.

I love how he points out that he's a social media expert and is telling folks that if they just marry Facebook and Twitter with Hubbard's marketing genius that they'd have dozens of people every hour coming in for a new personality test. Hate to break it to Florian but social media has now been around for about 20 years, and the cult has had plenty of time to take advantage of it. It ain't gonna happen. Especially when members are under orders not to make Facebook friends with anyone not in the cult. That kind of limits your evangelism effectiveness, when you are only allowed to preach to the converted.

Solid gold mountain bike: I saw a lot of mention in various bike blogs I read when this was first announced (Supermodel #1 is a triathlete and I ride a fair amount myself, so we follow the cycling world closely). Fortunately, the toxic Scientology brand image has penetrated even the world of carbon fiber and Lycra aficionados, and there was plenty of snide commentary about the fact that this was being offered to benefit one of the cult's front groups. It turns out that the frame they gold-plated is nothing special -- it's a mass produced "fat bike." Somebody with half a brain trying to raise money this way would work with a legendary hand builder of bike frames and would do a custom limited edition instead of just gold-plating a factory-built bike not known for excellence in construction. It'll be interesting to see what happens when they have zero offers another year or two from now and they're desperate to repay the loans they've taken out to finance this idiotic idea.


http://tonyortega.org/2014/06/08/scientology-sunday-funnies-the-tom-cruise-history-lesson-edition/
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« Reply #38 on: August 21, 2014, 07:32:55 AM »

      John P comments at The underground bunker.


 John P. • 7 hours ago

Today's news shows the cult's main weakness. As a computer scientist would say, the cult is not scalable. I've said for a while that "admin tech," turbocharged to a new level of incompetence by the white-knuckle hands-on management style of David Miscavige, means that the cult can't handle too many crises at once. In the past, this was not a big deal because the lawyers bringing suits against Scientology were each probing and feeling their way in the dark, and lacked the experience and background to rebut falsified evidence. Plaintiffs didn't know where the bodies were buried, and didn't for the most part know when Scientology was lying.

But here's another example where Hubbard's claim of having lived trillions of lives on countless different planets and being the first to have recall of all that "whole track" is so patently ridiculous: he never anticipated some sort of global information-sharing environment like the Internet. Surely, at least one civilization he lived through over the last eleventy zillion years would have had to have come up with something similar.

The upshot of today's news is that it provides evidence of what I and many others suspected would happen: the Internet is empowering lawyers to form an informal "cottage industry" on how to sue Scientology. Especially because this here forum provides a central launching pad to help direct lawyers' research, it's now possible for an aspiring lawyer to see what people have already done successfully. More importantly, it's now easy for people to see quickly what the cult's likely responses are. There was a huge industry around asbestos litigation, but that was expensive to join -- you had to take lots of classes to learn how to sue companies. But with the Internet as the primary teaching tool, the cost to become an anti-Scientology attorney is extremely low. And each success will build on success. In other words, this is just the beginning of a nightmare without end for Miscavige and his legal team.

As the number of lawsuits proliferates, there's not enough Miscavige to go around. He can't micro-manage everything the way he loves to do. Outside counsel increasingly must work independently, and when that happens, they're more likely to be predictable in their actions. And if plaintiffs' lawyers have done a good job on research, there's not much that the cult's lawyers can do. When you become predictable, you are as good as dead in this game.

By the way, it's utterly brilliant that Hamilton found the picture of the plaque honoring the head of the Warner Springs operation for minting so many new Scientologists. I can hardly wait until someone figures out how to enter into evidence all those videos of David Miscavige talking at various events about how many people are being introduced to Scientology by Narconon.

Yes, today is a really good day...
http://tonyortega.org/2014/08/20/narconons-cancer-new-lawsuits-court-order-scientologys-rehab-network/#comment-1551453078
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« Reply #39 on: November 15, 2014, 07:33:10 AM »

                          Comment by John P re :http://tonyortega.org/2014/11/14/classic-scientology-shenanigans-as-class-action-lawsuit-is-filed-against-legal-opponent-nafc/


 John P. •

I imagine that Miscavige thinks himself rather clever for this maneuver.

I am not a lawyer, of course (though I am a member of the Internet Armchair Barratry League, a far different thing). But I suspect that this latest sleazy (and desperate-sounding) trick will have a very different effect than what he thinks. This, plus the sleazy accusations about the decades-old criminal past of the NAFC founder's husband, is going to backfire by pissing off the court in Oklahoma where the main action is taking place. No court facing complex litigation with tons of defendants in a case like this will appreciate obviously dilatory tactics, and the cult is likely to find its chain getting jerked pretty hard in the future.

Clearly, the idea here is to cost the NAFC enough up-front money that they settle rather than imperil the organization's (probably limited) finances. Any non-profit would have to think twice about spending $1 million on a lawsuit if their total annual budget is only $2 or $3 million. But in this case, all that NAFC has to "sell" is the quality of their reputation, something that the cult is damaging directly by fraudulently claiming membership, and now indirectly by raising the accusations in this class action suit. So they're probably more backed into a corner than they would otherwise be.

Financially, I would suspect that attorney Keesling is working on a modified retainer agreement so he gets paid more if they win, rather than requiring the NAFC to front the entire costs in cash. As a result, I suspect that the NAFC's financial position is less strained than Miscavige perhaps anticipates. Incidentally, when the NAFC wins, I suspect that there are clauses in the standard NAFC agreement that says that if litigation is required to enforce the certificate holder's behavior, they're responsible for the NAFC's court costs plus damages, so there's not really a way for them to avoid paying up once judgment is rendered.

Finally, I wonder if the firm bringing the class action in LA is experienced in class action suits. I know from a few school buddies who are as wealthy as your average Global Capitalist from specializing in class action suits (think: victories in some of the bigger tobacco suits) that it's a very specialized skill set to bring and win class actions. I don't have time to check into this firm (have to get back to it cleaning up a mess here at Global Capitalism HQ from my European colleagues, how I spend a disproportionate number of my mornings) but it would be very telling if these guys were not class action experts. That would indicate that the cult is not exactly bringing its "A" game for the class action, indicating in turn that they fully expect it to be dismissed and thus making it just another cheap dilatory tactic.
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« Reply #40 on: January 08, 2015, 02:11:47 AM »

                                                                John. P  Responds to latest Scientology advert....

The ad reads;

"You are here

So are 7,252,659,834 others

203,421,712 suffer from drug addiction

697,845,431 victims of crime

1,991,208,953 human rights violations

There’s only one way to solve it

Together

The Church of Scientology works with over

50,000 schools, governments, churches, human rights organizations

To make a real difference

For more than 700,000,000 men, women, children

Across 193 nations

Tutoring (Applied Scholastics)

Criminal reform (Criminon)

Drug education (Foundation for a Drug-Free World)

Drug rehabilitation (Narconon)

Human rights education (United for Human Rights)

Mental health reform (CCHR)

Mentoring (The Way to Happiness)

Worldwide volunteering (Volunteer Ministers)

In a global network

Of 700,000 volunteers

From all faiths

Volunteering 50 million hours

To help people…freely

To help people selflessly

To help people indiscriminately

Teaching 19 million children the Truth About Drugs

Helping 4 million people lead lives without drugs

Enabling 43 million students to better their education

Making 111 million aware of their human rights

Allying 187,000 officials and advocates worldwide

Putting 112 million morals education materials in people’s hands

Giving aid to 24 million people in times of need

Because changing the world

Is a big job

But we can

Together

Our help is yours

scientology.org"


I don't have time this morning, but I believe that all the numbers in the latest Scientology commercial would be subject to an analysis technique known as Benford's Law. This basically is a way of spotting fake numbers in data sets derived from real-world sources. It says that the first digit of numbers is not actually random, but is heavily weighted towards lower numbers. The digit "1" is the first digit of a real-world number about 30% of the time, not the 10% of the time that a true random distribution would predict. We in Global Capitalism HQ have used Benford's Law from time to time to look at various bits of market data from companies that we think are suspect, and it's worked often enough that we routinely look at it.

The claim of 700,000 volunteers is so blatantly off by several orders of magnitude that it doesn't even bear repeating, except to show that it takes about 30 seconds to debunk it utterly. There are typically about 500,000 active volunteers in the American Red Cross at any one time, and virtually everyone in the US has had some sort of contact with them, whether it's a blood drive or as part of some disaster relief operation. They've got about $6 billion in revenue. It truly stuns me that the cult actually thinks its members won't realize that the Volunteer Ministers are, if they're lucky, about 1/1000 the size of the Red Cross.

I was particularly amused at the claim of "1,991,208,953 human rights violations" that Scientology is designed to help with. That's a statistic so devoid of meaning that it almost certainly is a complete and utter fabrication. What, there's not a central global statistical organization that tallies this sort of thing? The only possible way this could be an accurate number is if it's a reliable estimate of the total number of people who have had to listen to a Justin Bieber song on the radio in the last ten years. That's a definite human rights violation.

We in Global Capitalism HQ know the odd thing or two about good financial advice. We're sure that nobody reputable that we know would advise Nancy Cartwright to donate millions to Scientology. Unfortunately, her actual financial advisors are probably muzzled and wouldn't dare tell her not to donate to Scientology, either. Of course, there's a good chance that she has her money managed by Wiseman & Burke, one of the sleazy WISE companies run by a couple longtime Scientologists who have received some interesting cease & desist letters from various regulatory agencies, and whose silent partner appears to be Bodhi Elfman.

Finally, how could I look at the picture of the Narconon Istanbul customers without thinking of what life must be like in a Turkish prison. And then my moral outrage turns to giggles as I remember the only thing I know about life

First comment at Tony Ortega`s blog

http://tonyortega.org/2015/01/07/the-new-scientology-ad-running-on-tv-and-maybe-for-the-super-bowl/
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« Reply #41 on: March 20, 2015, 03:15:38 PM »

                                            John P.`s comment on Tony Ortega`s board  Re future of Miscavige.

John P. • 16 hours ago
My take: it doesn't matter what happens when Miscavige leaves or why he goes because the reserves will be frozen. It now appears that he's digging into reserves for capital expenditures, to shore up the facade that the Ideal Org, Ideal Mission, Ideal Continent, Ideal whatever program is rolling smoothly along. While I don't think they're losing money from operations yet, the fact that they have to touch the reserves is significant.

I suspect that Miscavige is so paranoid about anyone else getting access to the money that the passwords to the offshore accounts are in his possession, and his alone. If he's removed due to any reason, those funds essentially become frozen and unavailable to the cult for either operations or for future real estate development. If, at that time, they're running operating losses, they're out of business. They will have to close the doors because they won't be able to pay the bills.

As to the actual scenario that leads to his removal, I suspect strongly it will be either health-related or that he flees with the cash when the organization has deteriorated to the point where he knows the sharks are circling. I don't think his life expectancy will exceed the norm for males in the US. He apparently drinks pretty heavily, smokes, and I think his pitted skin implies he might be "juicing" on steroids to keep up his weightlifting program. If he makes it to 70, I'd be somewhat surprised.

Predicting prosecution is difficult. As I've written before, it would be difficult for any government agency to find room in the budget to prosecute a case that the cult will fight tooth and nail. That's because they budget money to prosecute criminals into different buckets. While the Justice Department spends billions of dollars on US Attorneys every year, there aren't a lot with the skills to deal with financial crime or human rights issues that are likely to be the heart of every case. And they have to get a big budget increase for the particular division of the DoJ through an increasingly incompetent Congress.

The same is true for the IRS criminal enforcement budget. I tried to find their criminal prosecution budget a while back and don't recall the exact figure, but I think it is on the order of $200 million. That seems like a lot until you understand that prosecuting the cult might cost $10 million to $20 million a year for 5 to 10 years. They can send a lot of mid-level tax cheats to jail and have a much bigger deterrent effect (as well as a much higher probability of recovering cash) for the same money.

This was almost certainly why the Feds decided not to pursue the human rights case against the cult that they were building a year or two ago, which Tony wrote about here. They just didn't have the budget in the Human Rights section of the DoJ to prosecute the case, and felt that their efforts would pay greater rewards in criminals caught and lives saved to focus on alien smugglers, etc.

I think the odds of a palace coup are minimal. It's like the situation in North Korea, but more farcical. Everyone who has any position in the organization is so beaten down that there's very little chance that they will lead a revolt. And even if a revolt succeeds, there's the matter of competence. Most of these people have been in for so long that they have no clue how the rest of the world works. They will use Hubbard's "Admin Tech" not because it works, but because it's all they know.

"Admin Tech" was hopelessly inept when Hubbard came up with it, and 50 years of progress in the rest of the world in managing successful businesses means that whoever is at the helm has precisely zero chance to come up with a strategy for fixing the cult and re-igniting growth. So a successful coup merely changes the person in charge of rearranging the deck chairs, but it doesn't change the fact that the Titanic is sinking.

http://tonyortega.org/2015/03/19/going-clear-fallout-imagining-the-fate-of-scientology-and-david-miscavige/#more-21101
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« Reply #42 on: April 14, 2015, 03:13:34 AM »

                                               Scientology Tax exemption


John P. • 4 hours ago
I would observe that one of the key reasons that the cult was able to get the tax exemption in the first place was the issue of "scale" -- that there were thousands of suits filed against the IRS by individual cult members. Even if the individuals didn't have the money to take any of the suits forward (likely the case, unless the cult were to fund their expenses), the IRS had to budget the money as if it were going to fight each one of them to the bitter end, which probably would have sucked up an inappropriate percentage of the annual budget for litigation.

It will be some sort of poetic justice, as well as the greatest chance for effectiveness, for the IRS to be deluged again on the subject of tax exemption, but this time coming from cult opponents. If the IRS sees more than a handful of these petitions, they will have to investigate. At the very least, a large number of petitions would help them make the case for some sort of additional funding for enforcement to Congress. If they were to get $30 million a year for the next couple of years to have a shot at getting their hands on $1 billion or more, that's a great bet. Even the crazy members of Congress who are always talking about "abolishing the IRS" could see that as a reasonable investment.

I'd observe that the petitions that will make the most difference would be those with highly specific information that could become either evidence or testimony in court. In other words, it's not enough to refer the IRS to this blog for questions because it is not directly evidence. It's a pointer to evidence, but not evidence itself. The best thing is for those who have experienced harassment personally to specifically state that in their submission, with enough detail that the IRS can see there is evidentiary value to your statement.

If you're a never-in, then providing source documents with specifics is useful. For example, a copy of the web site for the contractor who built the Flag building which characterized it as a $50 million project (IIRC) matched against the "Honor Roll" of donors showing that the cult raised at least $200 million for it.

Also for example, any direct evidence of the cult's desire to "obliterate" psychiatry is clearly against the public good. But the IRS would need evidence that this is the cult's aim, that CCHR and other groups are cult-controlled (they'd need evidence of shared addresses, of the fact that all executives are Scientologists, and statements from cult officials, such as Miscavige videos claiming that "our" campaigns are working). Depriving millions of Americans of scientifically valid mental health treatment is as damaging to the public good as anything else going on in the country today.

Just pointing people to the harassment experienced by Mike Rinder, Marty Rathbun and a handful of others, is useful but is not sufficient. If they can lay out the pattern of hundreds of other cases, it would be compelling. For example, back in the heady initial Anon protest days, many Anons were followed back to their cars, had their license plates run, and had "noisy investigation" campaigns at their offices and homes. If a couple dozen of those folks were to come forward, it would be as helpful as dozens of people pointing out the extreme cases of Rinder & Rathbun.

Edited to add: The key point here is that scale is what got the cult its tax exemption (thousands of lawsuits, all vanishing overnight) because the IRS was unable to respond to a massively scaled attack in the form of thousands of similar suits. But the world has changed and it is now the cult that is unable to deal with large-scale behavior from opponents. The fact that thousands of people clicked "yes" on an e-petition means nothing. Thousands of good evidentiary data points from thousands of different people who were wronged by the cult is something that Miscavige and his high-paid legal minions simply can't help to counter.


John P.  John P. • 3 hours ago
An additional (heartening) thought:

In my work at Global Capitalism HQ, I have been a witness in a number of white collar crime cases, putting away either crooked Wall Street types or crooked CEOs who have committed fraud. In one case in particular, the particular hedge fund manager in question was widely known to people in the business to have been involved in extensive insider trading activities for at least a decade before he was arrested. It's virtually certain that disgruntled ex-employees or competitors went to the SEC on more than one occasion, and nothing was done, probably because the SEC officials assessed that these were disgruntled individuals, and that it would be difficult to mount a successful investigation (i.e., one leading to a conviction) on the back of that.

But when the government finally got enough critical mass to convince them that an investigation would bear fruit, all of a sudden, the government's desire for useful information went off the charts. When the FBI contacted me, I had not had any contact with this individual (and only minimal contact with others at his hedge fund) for many years. But when they interviewed me, I know they also interviewed at least a dozen other people in my group who worked with this individual. They interviewed literally hundreds of others as well. They really left no stone unturned.

The intent was to bring only a handful of charges, out of hundreds of trades where they had at least some evidence of insider trading, in order to make the most airtight case, with the most straightforward examples of criminal behavior. They used less than 1% of the evidence gathered. The end result was that this individual was convicted on all counts and received the maximum sentence, likely leading to dying of old age in jail (not Bernie Madoff, by the way).

So if the IRS has flipped over from "disgruntled ex-member individual complaint" mode to "active investigation" mode, then you should be very encouraged to know that original, useful suggestions will be valuable to the investigation, even if they're not ultimately used.


Comment one and two on following link...

http://tonyortega.org/2015/04/13/if-you-want-the-irs-to-reexamine-scientologys-tax-exempt-status-its-time-to-get-real/
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« Reply #43 on: September 21, 2015, 04:23:14 AM »

                                   Re....Scientology’s fable about Rhodesia is a riot

John P. •

The whole Rhodesia thing, especially when you look at it in conjunction with the "Bulgravia" strategy, shows just how shallow and narcissistic Hubbard was. Probably delusional as well, when you throw in the treasure-hunting fantasy, which he also had from the days of the Good Ship Apollo, leading his followers to random "archeological" digs to find the treasure he buried in past lives.

The "Bulgravia" strategy was another fantasy about taking over a country to make it Scientology friendly. The idea was to roll up (IIRC) Albania, Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, and perhaps Romania into one country, by giving them vague promises of economic development, and then take over the government in a silent, easy coup. There are documents on the Internet about this. What struck me about the Bulgravia strategy was just how naive and uninformed it was -- Yugoslavia, which soon after, fractured into six warring countries, only kept the ethnic and cultural tensions of centuries tamped down under the iron hand of Tito, backed by the threat of Soviet invasion. To try to create a country that took all those suppressed tensions and added Albania, Bulgaria and others to the mix was idiotic in the extreme. Hubbard, of course, figured that anybody less successful than the US was run by idiots, and would thus be awed by all of his "Yankee ingenuity," and would fall at his feet.

The reality is that most political problems are really hard to solve; if they were easy, they would have been solved long ago. And when revolutionary change happens (i.e., the fall of communism, etc.) it typically happens in a time and manner that's impossible to predict (as I've said before in this forum, everybody in the diplomatic world in the West knew the Soviet Union was doomed, but nobody predicted correctly when it would fall or what would be the spark that led to its implosion).

The whole "I've got easy answers to hard problems" fantasy encapsulates Hubbard's whole life. It was in some sense a reflection of the techno-optimism of the 1930s through 1950s, where, for example, we were able to treat just enough cancer to know it was beatable, and we were riding a wave of drug discovery (polio vaccine, etc) that the popular belief was that cancer could be cured with a single pill whose discovery lay right around the corner. But it was more a reflection of his own delusional thinking, where he played at "famous botanist" and only got a creepy photo torturing tomatoes with an e-meter.

There's an object lesson here for today's politics: the current "cult of Trump", who proposes grandiose solutions to hard problems like wrenching over 11,000,000 illegal aliens from homes (which in many cases they own) and throwing them all on buses and deporting them, with no thought of cost, legality, and impact on the rest of the economy. Trump is perhaps the most egregious example of "Hubbard-think" in politics today, but there are many others.

For better or worse, we live in an era where we have complex problems that require complex solutions. That requires stamping out "Hubbard-think" wherever we find it. We've got a lot of work to do. Let's get to it.

http://tonyortega.org/2015/09/20/l-ron-hubbard-would-be-conqueror-scientologys-fable-about-rhodesia-is-a-riot/
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« Reply #44 on: September 27, 2015, 07:03:30 AM »

                                           Two comments from J P Capitalist after Tony Ortega`s article 26 th Sept 2015

John P. • 7 hours ago
"OK, honest question. Who’s more gullible, Ukrainians or Taiwanese?"

Alex, I'll take Ukrainians for $200.

The regular Scientology nonsense is destructive and dangerous, but when you do all the courses, the damage is generally limited to your immediate friends and family, but most of all, to you. Yes, disconnection, the vilest form of damage to others, is unspeakably evil, and any individual act of disconnection is greater than what any individual could suffer by being touched by the cancer of WISE. But I'm still going with WISE.

The WISE rubbish is more toxic to society at large if it were ever applied widely (hard to imagine that 1950's graph paper and adding machine measurement technology will gain much foothold here in the US where even the smallest business has abundant software to get far better measurement insight than Hubbard's silliness could ever provide). That's because applying to businesses of any size will run those businesses into the ground much faster, wrecking the careers of all the non-Scientologist employees and leaving a trail of ripped-off customers and vendors in its wake.

We in Global Capitalism HQ have done some outsourcing of financial research and software development to Ukraine. We've been impressed with the quality of work they've done for us, and we'll deal with them more in the future. So given that they seem to be generally smart business people and given that they're plugged into the world of the Internet and software pretty thoroughly as a nation, if WISE manages to snooker any significant number of Ukranian businesses against the backdrop of a relatively smart business community, then I have to say that they're more gullible than the Taiwanese, who as individuals can be forgiven the normal human desire to have something that will get them a better life, but who happen to have picked the wrong thing.

Oh, and I love Darth Xander's approach to dissolving the injunction... A simple argument that sounds like it could work. Not sure that removing the injunction will bring Anons flocking back to Clearwater, but it certainly ought to make the already massively paranoid Miscavige even more worried that he's left his flanks unguarded somewhere...




John P.  Orglodyte • 2 hours ago
You're exactly right and your thoughts are well said.

At one point, Tony asked me to consider doing something on the "Admin Tech." I started slogging through it and came up with a dozen articles, each exposing yet another bit of idiocy and following through just how it would wreck a business when put into practice. And that was just in the first 50 pages of Volume 0... I was just getting started. Unfortunately, Tony's idea was a single short piece with the sort of fun, self-parodying bloviating prose that I use when jousting with OTVIIIisGrrr8!, so that idea fell by the wayside.

There are many basic problems with Admin Tech, among them the fact that much of what Hubbard tells you to measure is just completely useless stuff, and the fact that it's possible to game the numbers endlessly. Far more important, however, is the fact that weekly stats are death to a business if you don't know how to manage them. Retailers do daily (and often, hourly) stats on how their stores are doing but they know how to use those stats so they don't make themselves crazy... Hubbard, by comparison, said that stats must go up every week, and he built a punishment mechanism of unrivaled complexity to torture those who couldn't deliver on this simplistic and foolish premise of ever-increasing prosperity.

When a WISE business tries to do the impossible, they quickly fall into the deadly trap: they pull business forward, often by various "prepayment" scams such as the various now-broke Scientology dentists did when selling unnecessary cosmetic treatments. They then mis-characterized the deposits as revenues and not liabilities owed back to customers until the deposits were actually used for services -- which is bad accounting always, and illegal sometimes. And when they did that, of course, the cult got its hands on its cut via "donations."

The scheme falls apart when you actually have to deliver the services you sold and the money that should have been set aside to cover the expenses of delivering the services is gone. At that point, bankruptcy inevitably follows, and the WISE vampires go on to find a new victim to bleed dry.

http://tonyortega.org/2015/09/26/darth-xander-files-motion-challenging-scientologys-anti-protesting-injunction/
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