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Ididntcomeback
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« Reply #30 on: October 29, 2011, 04:12:50 PM »

                         The Irish Times - Saturday, October 29, 2011

Harmless or hateful?


FIRST, A CONFESSION. I once went for a job interview at the Church of Scientology. Unwittingly, I hasten to add. As a J-1 student in recession-hit San Francisco, I answered a classified ad: “Rewarding work at church available for modest pay.” The address led me to a bookstore-cum-office, and I knew this was no ordinary “church” when the application form asked, “Are you related to intelligence agencies?” and “Have you ever been involved in any sexual perversion? Give who, where, when, what, on each instance.”

The misleading nature of that advertisement is small fry in the context of Scientology’s reputation, but it is illustrative of the organisation’s modus operandi. To its critics, the church of L Ron Hubbard is a loopy spiritual pyramid scheme designed to prey on the gullible and weak-minded. It is ridiculed probably more than any other belief system, it was almost banned in Germany and it’s the target of a vitriolic campaign by anonymous techies seeking its “destruction”.

Yet bear in mind that Scientologists have started no wars and committed no atrocities – unless you count John Travolta’s big-screen adaptation of Hubbard’s science-fiction saga Battlefield Earth, which is “widely regarded as one of the worst movies ever made”, according to Hugh B Urban, a historian of religion. In fact, no one has been provably killed in the name of Scientology. The most serious charge against it arose from the death of 36-year-old Lisa McPherson in controversial circumstances at a Scientology camp at Clearwater, Florida, in 1995. The case was dropped by prosecutors five years later after a botched autopsy.

Urban, who has also written books about sexuality and the occult, is determined to give Hubbard’s disciples a fair hearing in The Church of Scientology: A History of a New Religion . Tracing how “a penny-a-word science fiction writer” founded a popular self-help therapy, Dianetics, the springboard for Scientology, Urban is resolutely straight-faced, even when discussing the church’s most fanciful teachings. The closest he comes to a chuckle is when recounting Hubbard’s claim that reaching upper states of knowledge can kill: “Yet Hubbard risked his own life and health in order to achieve the dramatic breakthrough, passing through ‘the Wall of Fire’ to uncover the secret history of our galaxy.”

The deferential approach stretches credulity at times, but it generates interesting questions about double standards in our treatment of religions. Urban highlights how many religions are hierarchical and combine elements of secrecy with a self-justifying language or narrative. Repeatedly, he makes the point that the followers of a religion should not necessarily be judged by those in positions of power. “After all, the fact that Catholic bishops have covered up child sexual abuse does not prevent millions of ordinary believers worldwide from continuing to find Catholicism meaningful in their daily lives.”

In addition, by looking at Scientology in context, Urban helps to identify just why the church antagonises people so much. For the religious, it’s so brazen in its myth-making it’s a parody of faith. For the nonreligious, it contains just the right dose of pseudoscience to resemble the homeopathy of belief systems.

What’s more, it’s so goddam American, blending the celebration of self-advancement with what Urban concludes is an ostensibly for-profit motive. Hubbard once said Scientology appealed to Americans “because they tend to believe in instant everything, from instant coffee to instant nirvana”.

Urban also sheds light on why the church is so secretive and litigious, and convincingly explains how it has evolved – and even adapted its teachings – in response to regulation by government agencies. A clampdown by the US Food and Drug Administration in 1963 led Hubbard to reposition himself as a salesman of “spiritual” rather than “healing” services. Five years later, he set up the Sea Org, a naval branch of hard-core followers, as a preliminary strike against the threat of being banned.

Crucially, Hubbard then rebranded Scientology as a religion, adopting some of the iconography of Christianity despite dismissing Jesus as “a lover of young boys and men”. This allowed the church to make a plea for special protections in the US and, most significantly, to gain tax-free status in 1993.

A number of questions go unanswered in the book, as Urban admits. He mentions as influencing factors the threat of litigation and a fear of being made “fair game” – a practice of intimidation officially denied by the church. Some readers will crave more detail about Scientology’s finances and about the bizarre Tom Cruise-Hollywood nexus.

Urban compensates for lack of colour with philosophical musings about whether, for example, a religion that depends on secrecy can survive in an internet-driven world. (A Google search will throw up Scientology’s most closely guarded revelations, saving you up to $400,000 in church fees.) Urban also points out that, contrary to popular belief, as well as to the church’s claims, Scientology is in decline. In 2008 it had an estimated 25,000 followers in the US, down from 55,000 in 2001.

Urban’s unstintingly nonjudgmental tone almost has you feeling sorry for Scientology in the end. Almost. Perhaps unintentionally, his refreshingly even-handed treatment of the controversial church puts other religions in the dock.

Joe Humphreys is an Irish Times journalist. His latest book is God’s Entrepreneurs: How Irish Missionaries Tried to Change the World (New Island)

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/weekend/2011/1029/1224306682963.html
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« Reply #31 on: January 23, 2012, 07:40:37 AM »

                                           Religion, grrrr
Rachel Aviv

   BuyThe Church of Scientology: A History of a New Religion by Hugh Urban
    Princeton, 268 pp, £19.95, September 2011, ISBN 978 0 691 14608 9

You are invited to read this free book review from the London Review of Books. Register for free and enjoy 24 hours of access to the entire LRB archive of over 12,500 essays and reviews.

Empirical study led L. Ron Hubbard to the principles on which Scientology is based. He never claimed to have had a revelation. He spelled the principles out in 1950 in Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health, the bestselling self-help treatise in which he presents rationality as our birthright. The human mind, he wrote, is a perfect computer corrupted by ‘incorrect data’. He urged readers to reflect on their lives and ask themselves: ‘Where is the error?’ With the help of a lay therapist, called an ‘auditor’, they could uncover early traumas – mothers who wanted to abort them, or slept with too many men – and become less irrational: ‘Many of the things which Freud thought might exist,’ he wrote, ‘such as “life in the womb”, “birth trauma”, we in Dianetics have … confirmed.’

Hubbard insisted that the principles of Dianetics had nothing to do with ‘any mumbo-jumbo of mysticism or spiritualism or religion’. He assured readers that ‘Dianetics is a science; as such, it has no opinion about religion, for sciences are based on natural laws.’ Throughout the United States, people formed Dianetics clubs and helped each other to become ‘clear’: in this state, they would be free of all compulsions, neuroses and delusions, see colours vividly for the first time, appreciate melody, perform complex mathematical calculations and recall every moment of their lives. Hubbard was so confident of the merits of his electro-psychometer, a device used to detect hidden trauma by measuring galvanic skin response, that he asked the American Medical Association to investigate his new tool. The medical establishment showed no interest. In a review in the Nation, the kindest thing the psychiatrist Milton Sapirstein could say about Dianetics was that ‘the author seems honestly to believe what he has written.’

Hubbard took the rejection badly. When his followers were arrested for practising medicine without a licence, he complained that the United States made it ‘illegal to heal or cure anything’. He began to reconsider the distinction he’d made between psychology and spiritual practice. In a 1953 newsletter he wrote that the process of uncovering repressed memories through auditing is ‘perhaps allied with religion, perhaps a mystic practice and possibly just another form of Christian Science or plain Hubbardian nonsense’. The following year, embracing what he called the ‘religious angle’, he opened the first church of Scientology in Los Angeles. The electro-psychometer was no longer used as a diagnostic tool but became instead a ‘valid religious instrument, used in Confessionals’.

In The Church of Scientology, one of only a handful of academic treatments of the subject, Hugh Urban is less interested in the experiences of Scientologists than in the legal processes and semantic twists through which a set of beliefs becomes a religion. A professor of religious studies at Ohio State, Urban is interested in secrecy in religion, and in this book he chronicles the way Hubbard reacted to legal and political challenges to his authority by attempting (largely successfully) to conceal his theories from the public. Had he stuck with his original conception of Dianetics, his practices could have been investigated and judged according to scientific standards. A religion, on the other hand, can turn self-help platitudes into a scarce and privileged resource; criticism can be dismissed as intolerance, or persecution.

Like any therapy, Scientology appealed to people searching for a story that would explain why they hadn’t made the most of their lives. Hubbard’s disavowal of medicine required only slight adjustments. He replaced the term ‘brain’ (and tentative references to its architecture) with ‘spirit’ and ‘soul’, and expanded his concept of time. If a patient (called a ‘pre-clear’) couldn’t remember being abused, an auditor would encourage her to think about her experience in the womb; if she couldn’t recall any trauma there, she was urged to reflect on previous lives, in other galaxies, spanning hundreds or thousands of years. Through their recovered memories, pre-clears were initiated into the Scientology mythos, which hinges on the story of an intergalactic dictator called Xenu who 75 million years ago collaborated with psychiatrists to massacre a population of aliens whose tortured essences now inhabit the bodies of humans.

Scientology quickly became one of the loudest (and least articulate) voices in the anti-psychiatry movement of the 1960s – a time when doctors still had unfettered authority to administer drugs to unwilling patients. (The first international edition of the Scientology magazine, Freedom, showed horned devils performing lobotomies.) To Scientologists the ‘psychs’ were conspirators who wanted to take over the world. The new church’s survival depended on the claim – born of rejection and disappointment – that only religion is equipped to study the mind.

But Hubbard never let go of the dream that the world would become explicable through science. Since he lacked credentials, he defined his practice in the vaguest terms: ‘All we want is something with a high degree of workability, that’s all any scientist needs.’ Science was a perspective rather than a method. The proof that Scientology worked was Hubbard’s own life. In his book Mission into Time, he claimed he had finally triumphed over his unconscious; he now remembered ‘with certainty’ every moment of his existence. ‘The small details of it like what I ate for breakfast two trillion years ago are liable to go astray here and there,’ he wrote, ‘but otherwise it’s no mystery.’

Hubbard had begun exploring the redemptive possibilities of science in the 1930s and 1940s, when he was writing the voluminous short stories that appeared – he produced nearly 100,000 words a month – in Astounding Science Fiction, the most popular US magazine of its kind. His stories were crass, overdetermined and breezy; his heroes morally, mentally and physically superior to the rest of humanity. He had an exalted sense of his creative powers, but in any case held that artists were higher beings, superior to the ‘raw public’, which had been ‘booby-trapped’ into believing in a single reality.

Hubbard’s novel Typewriter in the Sky, published in 1940, tells the story of Horace Hackett, a writer who turns his best friend into a character in his own novel. Every time Hackett makes a creative decision, his friend’s reality changes: he moves helplessly through scenes, ‘swept along by a force which was wholly invisible and untouchable’. At the end of a long day’s work, Hackett muses, glass of Scotch in hand, that ‘the way you feel about stories sometimes. It’s – well, sort of divine.’ The story ‘comes bubbling out of us like music’. ‘When I go knocking out the wordage and really get interested in my characters,’ he continued, ‘it almost makes me feel like – a god or something.’

Soon Hubbard began interpreting that power literally, and many of his colleagues lost interest in his work. An extract from Dianetics was published in Astounding Science Fiction in 1950 and, according to Judith Merril, a frequent contributor, it became a ‘line of demarcation’. She saw it as marking the end of the magazine’s golden era: instead of using fantasy to pose questions that challenged social norms, it now prescribed fantastic solutions that were increasingly out of touch with the world.

Hubbard’s most devoted readers were absorbed into his fan-fiction empire; as they remembered their past lives, they became characters in his catch-all narrative. At each level of the process they attained new knowledge that enriched the fictional universe for them. The promised denouement was ascension on earth, a prospect that Hubbard regularly elaborated by writing new chapters, or ‘doctrine’. The religion would create a supremely rational species capable of all sorts of amazing feats – healing the sick, communicating with plants, levitating.

Hubbard gradually came to terms with years spent writing science fiction. It had once been a liability, not to be much discussed, but as he began to consider himself a religious leader he came to see his writing years as a productive phase of ‘research’. Thanks to science fiction, he had discovered an age when men could transcend the boundaries of the physical universe. ‘It … concerns actual incidents,’ Hubbard wrote. The only problem was that in his novels he had the timeline wrong: ‘The science fiction writer’s memory is faulty, and he gets himself all restimulated and so forth, and he doesn’t remember straight. Some of them remember it quite well, but then they reverse their time … and put it all into the future.’

Continued here...

http://www.lrb.co.uk/v34/n02/rachel-aviv/religion-grrrr
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« Reply #32 on: March 01, 2012, 09:36:23 PM »

                     Messiah Or Madman? New PDF Version


I was hoping to have this ready for Ron's birthday, but it took a little longer to prepare than I anticipated.

Anyway, here it is. A nice new pdf version of Bent Corydon's "L. Ron Hubbard - Messiah Or Madman?"

Please mirror this and share it as far and wide as possible - and quickly, as these things often get deleted fast.
http://www.multiupload.com/A8NAK37T70

N.B. This is basically from the widely known text version, but I have reformatted it and made a nice cover similar to the original. It is much easier to read and distribute. I proof-read and corrected bad OCR as best as I could. If anyone finds any glaring errors, please report back to this thread and I will collect them up and periodically do fixes. The photographic plates mentioned in the text are not included, so if anyone has access to these please share !

In reading thru this book again, I am impressed by how thorough it is and it really explains things very well - including the current management practices. Things really have NOT changed since Ron's days. I highly recommend that everyone reads this again.

Best,

The Real No User.

http://ocmb.xenu.net/ocmb/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=34580

Happy Birthday Ron ! . . . . I'm glad you're dead.


Here's the direct download choices pulled out of that multiupload link...
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=6J85LWHJ
https://rapidshare.com/#!download|553tl3|453069135|LRHMOM.zip|805  (Copy and paste )
http://depositfiles.com/en/files/86ebobpq5
http://hotfile.com/dl/110669535/77e4bf3/LRHMOM.zip.html
http://www.zshare.net/download/87909186203e925c/
(I didn't post the uploading.com one due to same fake download banner ad buttons).

-----------------------------------------------------------

Here's another mirror download (directly at megaupload.com) of the just PDF (not in a zipped mac folder)

File name: L. Ron Hubbard - Messiah Or Madman.pdf
File description: "L. Ron Hubbard - Messiah Or Madman" by Bent Corydon (PDF book)
File size: 895.79 KB
Download link: http://www.megaupload.com/?d=SNETNONE

The file is small enough to email to your friends, even on dial-up internet.

« Last Edit: March 01, 2012, 09:43:18 PM by Ididntcomeback » Logged
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« Reply #33 on: April 20, 2012, 01:11:09 PM »

                                 Transgender, Scientologist, “Cult Hero”

Why America’s Most Radical Transgender Activist Spent Twelve Years in Scientology, and What It Teaches About the Rest of Us

 A book review.  Sorry scientology. Yet another person comes out of the woodwork to tell the world what you really did for them.

By Jay Michaelson

http://www.religiondispatches.org/books/sexandgender/5899/transgender,_scientologist,_%E2%80%9Ccult_hero%E2%80%9D/
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« Reply #34 on: May 06, 2012, 03:25:43 PM »

                   Sunday, May 6, 2012 07:00 AM NZST


                                  My Scientology excommunication

I was one of the world's top 50 church members -- then one mistake changed my life

By Kate Bornstein

http://www.salon.com/2012/05/05/my_scientology_excommunication/singleton/

               Kate Bornstein, Transgender Writer And Activist, Discusses Life In And Exit From The Church Of Scientology

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/05/kate-bornstein-transgender-scientology_n_1483590.html
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« Reply #35 on: May 30, 2012, 09:48:29 AM »

                                How I Helped L. Ron Hubbard to ‘Take Over the Planet’


Back when queer activist Kate Bornstein was a boy named Al, she was a leading member of the Church of Scientology. She served aboard L. Ron Hubbard's flagship, and even worked directly with Hubbard on a campaign to control Scientology members more completely. Bornstein's new memoir A Queer and Pleasent Danger explains why she found Scientology so appealing, and what she brought to it. Here's an exclusive excerpt about Bornstein's work with Hubbard.

This excerpt has been edited for length here and there — the full version is much longer and contains some hilarious passages where Bornstein meets with Hubbard, including much more about their dynamic...

http://io9.com/5913972/how-i-helped-l-ron-hubbard-to-take-over-the-planet
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« Reply #36 on: June 18, 2012, 07:44:57 PM »

                    Interview
    June 13, 2012

No Longer At Sea: Kate Bornstein Talks Scientology

    A Queer and Pleasant Danger
    by Kate Bornstein
    Beacon Press , 2012

Kate Bornstein is a trans activist and writer who first gained notoriety with the 1995 release of Gender Outlaw: On Men, Women and the Rest of Us. Now a staple in college courses, that book remains controversial for questioning the male and female gender binary.

Always forthcoming, Bornstein has nonetheless avoided writing, until now, about one period of her life: the twelve years she spent as a staff member in the Church of Scientology. Recently, I caught up with Bornstein to discuss her new memoir, A Queer and Pleasant Danger.

You say you wrote this book for your daughter—what do you mean by that?

............    http://www.religiondispatches.org/books/atheologies/5988/no_longer_at_sea%3A_kate_bornstein_talks_scientology/

Jun 15 2012
Former Scientologist and Gender Activist Shares Her Life Story in a New Memoir, A Queer and Pleasant Danger


http://uprisingradio.org/home/2012/06/15/former-scientologist-and-gender-activist-shares-her-life-story-in-a-new-memoir-a-queer-and-pleasant-danger/
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« Reply #37 on: June 22, 2012, 05:07:16 PM »

                                Remedy of Black Dianetics – Coming Soon

             Marty Rathbun`s book coming soon.
Here is the cover...


http://markrathbun.wordpress.com/2012/06/21/remedy-of-black-dianetics-coming-soon/
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« Reply #38 on: June 24, 2012, 02:25:46 PM »

                                          The Book Is Now Available


Posted on June 23, 2012 by martyrathbun09 | 64 Comments

Order your copy at Amazon Books here: What Is Wrong With Scientology?
http://www.amazon.com/What-Wrong-With-Scientology-Understanding/dp/1477453466/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1340487137&sr=8-2&keywords=mark+%22marty%22+rathbun

Excerpt from Chapter Seven – Confessional:


 In this wise, a new moral code is imposed upon individuals, covertly and against their own determinisms.  It is exacerbated by repeated questioning about the individual’s failure to report on other Scientologists.  After a while, a corporate Scientologist modifies her behavior accordingly, in order to avoid more security checks.  She not only edits her own behavior and thoughts, she attempts to do the same with Scientologist friends and family members, so that she does not get into trouble for overlooking such transgressions of others.  Thus, a process that was originally intended to free a person from the self-imposed mental prison she has created by her own inability to live up to what she considers right and ethical conduct becomes reversed.  The preclear is instead forced to agree to a new mental prison, imposed by the organization based on what it decrees to be right or wrong.  In short, the process replaces a person’s native judgment with a new judgment of its own.  In practice, it is a dark and painful operation, making a person less self-determined and more other-determined.

    It seems that the only solution open to corporate Scientologists to cope and carry on within their culture is to become moralists.  Moralists who enforce on self and others morals which have been implanted.  If corporate Scientologists police their own conduct fastidiously enough, and interfere enough with the behavior and conduct of their fellows, they reckon they might be spared the cost, embarrassment and pain of being ordered to further batteries of security checks. In fact, that is the only behavior that does avoid continual, expensive, and degrading security checks in corporate Scientology.

    This is yet another example of Scientology Inc.’s  reversal of end product.  Confessional technology was developed with the purpose to help an individual recognize she is the cause of her own destiny – and it has a long history of realizing that purpose.  This priceless technology has been twisted and corrupted to the point where now the individual winds up with her destiny blueprinted and dictated by the church.

    These blueprints are enforced through a related – and now similarly corrupted – technology of Scientology: the technology of ethics.


Order your copy from Amazon Books at, What Is Wrong With Scientology?
http://www.amazon.com/What-Wrong-With-Scientology-Understanding/dp/1477453466/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1340487137&sr=8-2&keywords=mark+%22marty%22+rathbun

http://markrathbun.wordpress.com/2012/06/23/the-book-is-now-available/
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« Reply #39 on: June 27, 2012, 03:53:51 PM »

                                Kindle Edition Available of What Is Wrong With Scientology


Posted on June 25, 2012 by martyrathbun09 | 99 Comments

The Kindle edition is now available at Amazon Books, at What Is Wrong With Scientology? Kindle Edition.  The whole introduction and part of Chapter One is available at this link.

Definition of: Kindle

A portable e-book reader from Amazon.com that includes free wireless downloads using Sprint's 3G cellular service. It also provides basic Web access along with music storage and playback. The Kindle features a 6" screen, except for the DX model, which has an iPad-sized 10" display.

Introduced in late 2007 with 88,000 titles in a modified Mobipocket format, more than a hundred best sellers were offered. Book selection continually increases as models become thinner, lighter and faster. In 2010, the third-generation Kindle offered optional Wi-Fi.

The Kindle uses a monochrome display that enables the battery to last up to a month (see E Ink). For a fee, newspapers such as The New York Times and Wall Street Journal are downloaded during the night for morning reading. Users' personal documents can be e-mailed to Amazon and downloaded to the Kindle or transferred via USB.

Kindle Books for Other Devices
In 2009, Amazon introduced the Kindle app for the PC, Mac, iPhone and iPod touch, allowing customers to read their Kindle books on other devices at no extra cost. In addition, automatic bookmarks let readers pick up in one format where they stopped in the other. In 2010, the company announced a Kindle app for the iPad and other tablet computers. See Kindle Fire and Mobipocket.


In the meantime, Haydn James happened to stop by the other day and I gave him my proof copy which he finished and sent me his feedback on.  He agreed to sharing it with you.

Haydn James’ Review of What is Wrong With Scientology?

Finished reading your book. As an experienced Scientologist, I
wondered: what will I get out of reading it? The answer? A great
deal, a very great deal.

For me it answered a number of unanswered questions, but most of
all (and having finished reading the book I know you will love
this) it confirmed for me that my current spiritual journey and
purpose to help others is as it should be. Not because you, Hubbard
or anyone else told me so or because my views happen to coincide
with yours but because I know it to be true for myself. And that is
incredibly liberating.

I told you when I visited you and Mosey that I have never been
happier. That wasn’t quite true, I am all the happier for having
read your book.

I would have finished reading it sooner but I made the mistake of
putting it down to grab some food, at which point Lucy picked it
up, started reading and wouldn’t give it back. She loved it and
thought it brilliant!

Since I have now read the proof you kindly provided, I thought it
only fair that I also buy it, which I have done and posted a
review. I describe it as “A unique book on Scientology”. And it is.
But I also believe you are the Tom Paine of Scientology. I believe
this book will be to the subject of Scientology and Scientologists
what Common Sense was to the American people and their ultimate
freedom. Just as Tom Paine discussed and destroyed the validity of
willingly giving up ones freedom to an uncontrollable entity known as
“royalty”, you discuss and destroy any notion that one should
become a slave to a subject and organization designed to free
people. Like Paine’s tract “Common Sense”, the truth in your book
is unmistakable and unavoidable.

In a word … brilliant.

Haydn


Print Edition is still available at, What Is Wrong With Scientology? Print Edition
http://www.amazon.com/What-Wrong-With-Scientology-Understanding/dp/1477453466/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1340680338&sr=1-1&keywords=what%20is%20wrong%20with%20scientology&tag=vglnk-c498-20

http://markrathbun.wordpress.com/2012/06/25/kindle-edition-available-of-what-is-wrong-with-scientology/
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« Reply #40 on: July 02, 2012, 08:56:20 AM »

                     Rathbun's book - REVIEWS!

Originally Posted by Dulloldfart
Here you go. I'll even not indent or colour it for you.

Note that this review is now posted in the top spot for critical reviews at Amazon.com:
http://www.amazon.com/product-review...reative=380553

Paul

-----

From this post:

If this book is aimed at the public at large who have as yet not gotten involved with scientology and it is trying to convince them that scientology is good, I believe it will not be effective.

It is literately riddled with scientology jargon and references and unfounded statements of fact about scientology and Hubbard that I believe will not interest this public on any scale.

However, I believe this book is going to have great appeal to scientologists who have left organized scientology, fleeing its abuses but are still true believers in Hubbard. And why not? Marty rightly points out many horrid abuses within the organized scientology and purports to offer a kinder and gentler scientology where people are not beaten, screamed at, hard sold beyond ability to bear and the like. Who would not like that?

I liked that the book told of some horrid abuses in organized scientology. There are many horrid abuses within organized scientology that go far beyond the examples given by Marty.

I also really liked reading that Marty to a degree seems to promote a non-fundamentalist approach to scientology, saying people should be able to leave it, take breaks from it, not have to believe everything Hubbard says, etc. I think that is a good start.

I especially liked reading the last chapter or two of the book and really, really wanted to believe that Marty reaches out to and seems to embrace good parts of other practices that foster human rights and decency. I like that he seemed to be preaching that scientologists should not think they have this superior technology and be arrogant as if they were somehow above all others, when they certainly are not.

I really, really wanted to like Marty especially as I believe that he is being honest about what he has written in this book being his actual beliefs. I also am a big believer of freedom of speech and expression and that most certainly includes Marty and those who believe in scientology like Marty does. I also knew Marty before he went directly under Miscavige and abused others and I knew him then not to be an abusive person.

However, the parts that I did not like about this book outweigh in importance what I liked.

Marty makes countless references to Hubbard's "technology" and "research" and speaks of all that as if it is somehow true. Hubbard had absolutely no qualifications in the field of mental health and in fact falsified his credentials many times.

Of the countless "levels" and "auditing processes" Hubbard supposedly researched, none to my knowledge were ever peer reviewed nor subjected to any scientific analysis. People have died following Hubbard policies, committed suicide and otherwise were harmed in many cases yet Marty does not discuss that and instead seems to sweep it aside.

Hubbard constantly made these sweeping statements proclaiming the brilliance of his "discoveries" and then demanded that people pay large sums for them without ever proving that his discoveries were valid. For example, Hubbard released the highly dangerous "Introspection Rundown" proclaiming it was one of the great discoveries of the 20th century and saying that the last need for psychiatry was now gone.

Yet he had no qualifications whatsoever to make such proclamations and what he released was a highly dangerous "rundown", in effect practicing medicine/psychology without a license but being protected under the cloak of religion.

In this book Marty will often compare scientology to other practices in an effort to make it somehow seem normal or harmless. For example he says that Hubbard’s dictates about removing undesirables from society and taking away their civil rights is much like the view of the mental health community now. I disagree. Marty does not list the types of people Hubbard felt should be removed from society and have civil rights taken away. For example Hubbard felt that applied to people who were gay. That is not the view of the mental health field. Nor does the mental health field say that these people should be disposed of quietly and without sorrow like Hubbard says.

And, in my opinion Marty does the readers a disservice by discounting the abuses of Hubbard himself. Marty tends to justify Hubbard’s crazy policies to destroy others and the like as having come from a time when organized scientology was fighting for its life from huge enemies.

But who are these imagined “enemies” if not individuals or government departments trying to help people who themselves were harmed by the standard practice of Hubbard’s scientology.

Marty, for example, talks of a decade and a half of the “unfettered” guardians office’s operations that had come back to haunt Hubbard. The guardians office was not unfettered, that was a line put out by Miscavige and bought by many. In actual fact the guardians office was run by Hubbard himself.

The crimes the guardians office committed were pursuant to Hubbard’s own programs and orders. Or they were to clean up messes caused by people harmed by the standard practice of scientology as written by Hubbard.

When the FBI conducted a massive raid on scientology offices in the USA in 1977, immediate actions were taken by their guardian office bosses in the UK to remove evidence of Hubbard running the guardians office from their files. It took well over 100 people weeks to get that evidence out of the files, there was so much of it.

Much of the real cruelty within organized scientology was in fact carried out either by Hubbard himself or ordered by or condoned by Hubbard. Hubbard was known to demand heads on pikes and the brutal treatment of many who supported him for the crazy crimes and the like that Hubbard in his madness imagined they committed.

It was Hubbard who wrote the horrid policies of disconnection, rehabilitation colonies and so many other things abusive in nature. Hubbard in his madness imagined many enemies of scientology such as the world bank, basically all of the mental health field, the Rockefellers and so many more that could have cared less about organized scientology.

And all the while Hubbard was getting millions of dollars of scientology money, much through threats and abuse, while lying to the greater scientology community that he never took any money from scientology.

I could be wrong but I believe that Marty does believe what he wrote and I believe that Marty really wants a better world. But in my humble opinion, he himself is doing some of the very people he wishes to help a great disservice with this book by trying to imply that parts of scientology are less dangerous than they really are or that somehow Hubbard was not the abusive madman that countless people have testified him to be.

I think that the real good or bad in scientology lies in the heart of the scientologist and how and why she uses it. I agree with Marty that you can’t kill an idea and that people have a right to believe in what they want. But, again, I feel this book can mislead people into believing scientology is more than it is and that Hubbard was more qualified or a better person than he was.

Anyway this all is my opinion. I actually wish all the scientologists great healing and recovery. And this includes the author.

[Denise Brennan]

http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?27476-Rathbun-s-book-REVIEWS!/page20
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« Reply #41 on: July 02, 2012, 07:23:25 PM »


                      Sunday, 1 July 2012
                                                               Atack Reloaded

After years of silence Jon Atack, who literally wrote the book on Scientology, made a brief but effective television appearance in May – and the good news is, he is working on a new book.

Jon Atack, whose book A Piece of Blue Sky remains the definitive work on Hubbard-era Scientology, made a fleeting appearance on British television in May.1

Atack's television appearance does not signal a return to the front-line against Scientology: it is more of a one-off gig.

But the good news is, he is working on another book – of which more below....

http://infinitecomplacency.blogspot.com/2012/07/atack-reloaded.html
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« Reply #42 on: July 31, 2012, 11:37:56 PM »

                                                Frank memoir a wild ride

In Kate Bornstein's new memoir, "A Queer and Pleasant Danger," the transgender writer and speaker admits it's not readers she's really speaking to.

She's directing the story of her life—from the years spent currying L. Ron Hubbard's favor as a Scientologist to the time she served as a BDSM "slave" to two women in Seattle—to her own daughter.

That child, Jessica, is now grown, with kids of her own. According to Bornstein, Jessica remains in the upper echelons of Scientology and wouldn't be able to contact ousted relatives like her. So she speaks to her long-estranged daughter through her memoir, released earlier this summer.

   

With Scientology in the headlines following the break-up of Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes, it's fascinating to read chapters about the nascent movement, back in a time when Scientologists like Bornstein would have never considered it a religion. Bornstein, back when she was "Al Bornstein," met Hubbard and moved up rapidly through the ranks, eventually hitting a bizarre and 007-like snag in her Scientology career.

After leaving Scientology, Bornstein decided it was time to fully devote herself to getting gender reassignment surgery and began living as a woman full-time. Soon, she was in the bondage and domination scene, and she's frank—sometimes to the point of creeping you out—with the details of what a night spent in BDSM "play" can be like.

Eventually, Bornstein evolves into her current incarnation as a gender theorist, writer and performer. It's an unbelievable ride (or at least it would be if it were a story told by someone else).

The experience of peeking into Bornstein's mind can be at times thrilling, voyeuristic and confusing. But the storytelling never stops being entertaining.

The book will delight Bornstein's fans with new material and introduce the uninitiated to a truly unique spirit. Either way, it will be fun, funny and never mean.

http://www.redeyechicago.com/news/local/ct-red-kate-bornstein-book-review-20120731,0,7121697.story
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« Reply #43 on: August 24, 2012, 08:07:21 AM »

                                             Scientology

Scientology Book Bonanza! Jeff Hawkins Delivers, and More Reasons for Librarians to Hide

By Tony Ortega Sun., Jun. 10 2012

http://blogs.villagevoice.com/runninscared/2012/06/scientology_jefferson_hawkins_book.php
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« Reply #44 on: October 24, 2012, 06:27:39 PM »

                         Red Pill Diary - new book coming out on Scientology and Nation of Islam

http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?28993-Red-Pill-Diary-new-book-coming-out-on-Scientology-and-Nation-of-Islam
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