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Ididntcomeback
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« on: May 29, 2009, 05:31:38 PM »

As Germany is finally getting its act together I figure they deserve a thread
of their own.
Don`t know what is up with the date on this one.
But it came through as a Present time Google news alert ??

Germany's Battle Against Scientology


Germany's Battle Against Scientology
By Andrew Purvis/Berlin Monday, Dec. 17, 2007
Germany scientology
The Church of Scientology headquarters in Berlin, Germany
Miguel Villagran / AP

   
           

The interior ministers of Germany's 16 states have launched an investigation into the activities of the Church of Scientology, hoping to assemble the evidence to support banning the U.S.-based organization from operating in Germany. But skeptics question whether such a move is politically and legally tenable — or wise. A similar move by the state-level interior ministers in 1997 concluded, in its report, that "the Scientology organization, agenda and activities are marked by objectives that are fundamentally and permanently directed at abolishing the free democratic basic order," but that more time was needed to "conclusively evaluate" the group. In the intervening years, the Church of Scientology organization has continued to work in most of Germany's states.
Related
Stories

    * Cruise Film Gets German OK

More Related

    * Why Germany Hates Tom Cruise
    * Scientology on Trial in France: Can a Religion Be Banned?
    * Germany’s Offering to Cruise

The new effort to close the group down may have been spurred by its raised profile in Germany over the past year. The opening of its new headquarters in Berlin last January put the organization back in the headlines, and it became the center of a national furor last summer when the German Defense Ministry initially barred access to a key location for the filming of a movie about about anti-Nazi hero Claus Schenk von Stauffenberg because the title role was played by high-profile Scientologist Tom Cruise. (Germany later relented).

Those behind the new effort to outlaw Scientology believe their prospects have improved since 1997. Ulrike Sweden, a spokesperson for the Hamburg Ministry of Interior, which has taken the lead in the latest efforts, says the most significant change is a 2004 ruling by a Cologne judge in a case brought by Scientologists to end surveillance by state intelligence agencies. The judge ruled that the monitoring was warranted because the activities of the Scientologists were a threat to German constitutional protections, and in particular the right of Germans to exercise their political will, the right to equal treatment, and guarantees against bodily harm. (The judge ruled, among other things, that the group brainwashes members.) Says Sweden, "For the first time we had a judge, and not just rumors, stating that the group was dangerous." (Since 1995, the Church of Scientology has not enjoyed the legal protections accorded to religions in Germany, after a judge ruled that it was not a religion but a group "masquerading as a religion in order to make a profit.")

A spokesperson for Scientology in Germany denies that the group brainwashes members or has a political agenda. The effort to compile information toward a ban is simply a "waste of taxpayer euros," the spokesperson said.

The new initiative requires Germany's intelligence agencies in each state to compile a dossier on Scientology activities that might violate the German constitution. Their report will probably be presented at the next meeting of interior ministers in the spring, and then delivered to Germany's federal interior minister, Wolfgang Schaeuble, who will have to decide whether or not to initiate a federal-level investigation. The Hamburg officials are hoping that in 2008 or 2009 a process will be initiated that will result in a federal ban on the organization, potentially freezing its assets and outlawing fund-raising and recruitment — restrictions similar to those that apply to several neo-Nazi organizations.

But German analysts, and some government officials speaking on condition of anonymity, doubt that the new effort will get very far. "It is not only unlikely, it won't happen," said one official familiar with the process. Having been alerted to the state-level investigation now under way, the Church of Scientology is likely be extra careful not to transgress the law. "If you really want to do this kind of thing, you keep quiet, you don't announce that you are going to do it, " said the official. Moreover, even if courts could uncover illegal behavior, it's a long step to banning the group altogether. "There are a lot of pedophiles in the Catholic Church but no one is talking about outlawing" the church, notes Ulrich Battis, professor of constitutional law at Berlin's Humboldt University, And bringing the full weight of the Federal government to bear on an organization that officials say has only 6,000 members in Germany would be seen as a disproportionate response given the political cost — Germany has been criticized by the U.S. State Department for restrictions it already places on Scientology. As one official put it, "We have other things to worry about."

Scientology's claim to be a church despite the German courts' ruling denying it such status could also cause problems for the government at home, where many Germans believe the question of what qualifies as a religion is a matter of personal conscience rather than government authority. Skeptics warn that taking steps to ban Scientology could backfire, either by driving members underground or by making them appear as victims of state persecution. The 1997 government probe prompted several Hollywood stars, including Dustin Hoffman and Goldie Hawn, to sign an advertisement printed in German newspapers comparing the move to the repression of Jews under Nazism. Writing in the Sueddeutsche Zeitung, religion commentator Matthias Drobinski argued that Scientology is actually in decline in Germany, and that its gleaming new Berlin headquarters is "a shimmering fa�ade". Drobinksi credited its decline to the anti-Scientology monitoring and educational efforts by "the state, political parties, the established church and trade unions." Banning the group would simply give them an undeserved boost, he argued: "The demonization of the flagging troupe may only benefit one group — Scientology itself. "

Still, the state interior ministers appear determined to press ahead, portraying themselves as protectors of their citizens from a "threat," and suggesting, in the words of one government statement, that Germany's Nazi past obliges the government "to monitor the development of any extreme groups within its borders — even when the group's members are small in number." Speaking to reporters last week, Ralf Stegner, the interior minister for the state of Schleswig-Holstein, called Scientology a "totalitarian" organization. "They want to break people's will," he said. "That's why we have to fight them." Federal interior Minister Schaeuble, however, has yet to tip his hand on how he will respond to the states' initiative. His ministry has said that the group is unconstitutional, but in a statement Schaeuble himself said that the best way to deal with it was through "prevention and education." That suggests a legal ban on Scientology may not be imminent.

http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1695514,00.html
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« Reply #1 on: February 22, 2010, 04:01:06 PM »

SternTV:                Scientologist leaves the cult on camera

http://forums.whyweprotest.net/15-media/sterntv-scientologist-leaves-cult-camera-english-subs-61891/
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« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2010, 10:09:18 AM »


 Kai Wiesinger and scene from German Scientology movie on Nachtcafé


Hello to all fine anons here :)

In this short clip, Kai Wiesinger, who plays the Scientology-villain in the upcoming German movie about Scientology "Bis nichts mehr bleibt" ("Until nothing is left"), talks about production of that very same movie. As a little extra, there's another scene that I think has not been shown before to get your appetite going.

As always, this goodie is fully subtitled in English.

Enjoy!

http://forums.whyweprotest.net/15-media/kai-wiesinger-scene-german-scientology-movie-nachtcafe-62223/#post1176695
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« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2010, 07:34:52 AM »

           Caberta to host next event in Hamburg, March 26th 2010.


Crossposted and translation from http://forums.whyweprotest.net/222-d...taltung-62552/
Thank you MJ for posting.

This is going to be BIG. Our very own Markus Stuckenbrock as well as Jesse Prince will attend! Here is the translation:


INVITATION

We cordially invite you to the educational event on the Scientology-Organisation:

SCIENTOLOGY
ABOUT THE RIGHTLESS PEOPLE IN THE SYSTEM OF L. RON HUBBARD

on March 26th and 27th 2010, Handwerkskammer Hamburg, Holstenwall

Schedule:
March 26th 2010

6.00pm
Fates in Scientology from Hubbard to Miscavige:

People reporting from the center of power in the USA

Hana Whitfield, USA: L. Ron Hubbard, the founding years of the Sea Org
Jesse Prince, USA: David Miscavige assumes power
Bruce Hines, USA: Living in the Sea Org, the total control, the role of prominent members
Marc Headley, USA: The current situation, working conditions in the Sea Org elite unit, forced abortions for statistics, etc

Fates of Europeans

Wilfried Handl, Austria
Markus Stuckenbrock, Germany
Lino Bombonato, Germany


With discussion afterwards



March 27th 2010


10.00am Rightless individuals in ideologically closed systems - a comparison


Account of the situation in the former GDR:

Deputy of the federal commissioner for the files of the state security service of the former German Democratic Republic (GDR):

The surveillance practices of the state security service (Stasi) and its impact on the people.
Forced adoptions, reasons and consequences in the system of the former GDR
The role of prominents in the system of the former GDR, PR-strategy.

Portrayal of the Scientology Organisation

Ursula Caberta

Ideological principles, control system, government as a concept of an enemy


Graham Berry, USA: The effect of image on politics and justice

discussion

Pause



2.00pm

Panel discussion with all international and national guests on the midmorning event, expanding of the discussion the previous day.

Focus on: individuals after the escape - how does life go on?
What kind of assistance is needed to carve out a life in newfound freedom? Why do so few celebrities detach themselves from the system Scientology etc.

Discussion with the audience.
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« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2010, 09:17:21 AM »

Quote:
Trouble is brewing between the Church of Scientology and German public broadcaster ARD ahead of the TV premiere of a drama portraying the controversial faith as dangerous and unethical.

“Bis nichts mehr bleibt,” or “Until nothing remains,” is the dramatised true story of a family torn apart by the religion, and Scientology officials may try to ban its broadcast on March 31, daily Süddeutsche Zeitung reported on Monday.

Scientology spokesperson Jürg Stettler told the paper that members of the church were not invited to a supposedly secretive press screening of the film last week, and ARD has tried “everything so that we don’t see the film before broadcast.”

“It is a violation of ARD’s programming guidelines, what they’re planning to spread,” he said. “The station is required to support religious tolerance, not the opposite.”

Until now, no German television station has directly addressed Scientology in such a fashion, which is designated as an anti-constitutional organisation in the country.

The film’s message is clear, the paper reported, portraying Scientology as a dangerous totalitarian organisation in direct conflict with democratic society.

Now the group is making its own documentary and plans to show it within the next two weeks in Hamburg or Munich.

More here...

http://www.thelocal.de/society/20100308-25733.html

and here...
http://www.ejc.net/media_news/scientologists_try_to_block_intolerant_german_feature_film/
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« Reply #5 on: March 25, 2010, 04:49:19 PM »

             "TIME" ran an article on Scientology back in `91.
"The cult of greed and power. (Google it.)
As a result TIME spent 10 years and $11,000,000
defending charges of liable in the courts. TIME won.

Nice to see them taking a tentative step back into the exposure of
this evil, deceptive CULT.

                       In Germany, Scientology Outrage Over a Critical Film

In a scene in a new fictional movie about Scientology called Until Nothing Remains, one of the group's leaders is giving an impassioned speech to followers in Germany. The camera pulls in tighter on the man's face, and all of a sudden, he cries out "Clear Germany!" to a round of rapturous applause. No, he's not talking about pushing all non-believers out of the country — he's referring to "the state of clear," a condition characterized by an absence of painful, reactive and uncontrollable emotions.

Because of scenes like this that Scientologists believe depict their religion in a frightening way, the group is not the least bit happy about the film, which airs on Germany's ARD public television network on March 31. In fact, Scientologists claim they are the victims of a "hate campaign" being propagated by the movement's critics. But Carl Bergengruen, the head of drama at a public broadcaster in southwest Germany who was instrumental in getting the movie made, insists that the filmmakers did not set out to vilify Scientology but to show how people can be drawn to "promises of salvation."

The movie tells the story of a young couple, Gine and Frank Reiner, who are brought into the religion through the manipulative tactics of Scientology recruiters. Eventually, the husband decides to leave the group, losing not only his wife in the process, but also his young child and a big portion of his family's inheritance, which his wife has donated to the church. Bergengruen says the film is loosely based on the real-life experiences of a German man named Heiner von Rönn, a one-time member of the organization. He says the filmmakers conducted exhaustive research in order to portray the religion as realistically as possible, including interviewing various former Scientology members and even going undercover to find out more about how the group works.

That such a negative portrayal of the religion is being produced in Germany is not surprising. Although the group has several thousand members in Germany, Scientology is not officially recognized as a religion and the German government monitors its operations. Authorities even tried to ban the group three years ago — a move that failed due to lack of evidence that the group was undermining the constitution.

This was when public mistrust of Scientologists was at its peak in Germany due to the controversial filming of the Tom Cruise movie Valkyrie. Many Germans were outraged that Cruise — with his strong affiliations with Scientology — had been chosen to play the role of Claus von Stauffenberg, a Nazi resistance fighter who some Germans regard as a national hero because of his attempted assassination of Adolf Hitler. Defense Ministry officials criticized the decision to allow the filmmakers to shoot scenes on historic German landmarks, such as the Bendlerblock where Stauffenberg was executed in 1944. But the final straw for many Germans was when Cruise was awarded a prestigious "Bambi" media award — similar to an Oscar — for his work in the film.

Cruise answered his critics in a 2007 interview with People magazine, asking Germans to "save your comments until you see the movie." "I want to think positive and concentrate on the film," he added. "I carry a great responsibility to the Germans, for whom a man like Stauffenberg means so much." (Read: "Why Germany Hates Tom Cruise.") http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1637564,00.html

Scientologists say Until Nothing Remains presents an inaccurate view of their religion and that they're looking into taking legal action against the network. "Of course this must have consequences. Our lawyers are looking into this very carefully," Sabine Weber, a Scientology spokeswoman in Germany, tells TIME. She says she has only seen clips of the film but, at times, she couldn't help but "to laugh out loud." She refers to a scene in which the achievement of the "state of clear" is celebrated with alcohol, calling this "unthinkable." In another scene, the film depicts what could best be described as a Scientology penal camp, which Weber says doesn't exist. To voice their frustrations, the group's members have distributed flyers outside a screening accusing the filmmakers of discrimination. Weber says the group is even working on its own movie to tell its side of the story. That film includes interviews with Rönn's ex-wife and is expected to be released before the airing of Until Nothing Remains.

Ursula Caberta, head of the Hamburg Interior Ministry's Scientology Task Force and one of the consultants of the ARD network's film, says she doesn't see the harm in scrutinizing the group's practices through film. "I keep waiting for a big Hollywood picture on the topic," she says. It's probably safe to say that Cruise won't be starring in that vehicle — unless it paints Scientology in the proper light.

Read: "Scientology Trial in France: Can a Religion Be Banned?"
http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1901373,00.html

http://www.time.com/time/arts/article/0,8599,1974924,00.html
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« Reply #6 on: March 25, 2010, 06:05:24 PM »

This interview with Niki Stein, author and director of the film appeared in the newspaper "Frankfurter Rundschau":

original: Interview mit Niki Stein: Feinde der Verfassung | Frankfurter Rundschau - Medien

Quote:
Mr. Stein, you took a deep and intensive look at Scientology for 1.5 years. What is your conclusion?

I don't know of a single publication that says: The danger is overstated. Not one. The statements by Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard and also by his successors can not be mistaken. It is about getting rid of a democratic liberal order and creating a state which strictly discriminates between able and unable people. In the end it is about what Hitler wanted too - to create a social-darwinist form of state.

Would you say that the danger posed by Scientology has been played down in recent years?

Definitely. It's not taken seriously, because people aren't informed about it. That's why I thought it important that this film was produced. It is incredibly courageous that the ARD dared to do something like this.

The film was created amongst strict secrecy. There was a prohibition of spreading infrormation and you purported to produce a crime show. Looking back, was the secrecy necessary?

Yes. If you produce a film about the anti-constitutionality of the NPD [remark: german neonazi party] there is going to be secrecy as well. Noone announces that beforehand. No journalist would get the idea to turn this into an accusation. When it comes to Scientology this happens - I don't understand why that is. But we also had a responsibility for our actors. Actors are sensitive people. I don't know how they would have reacted if they had received obscure phone calls.

You yourself received such calls, because Scientology found out about it because of an instance of carelessness. Were you afraid?

I wouldn't say I was afraid. Sometimes I had a strange feeling. But basically I expected much more. The attempts at intimidation were rather discreet. I wasn't threatened with something like: "Watch for your children." They're way too clever for that. You only get calls which state: "We know what you are doing." That's enough. There were also completely open offers in the spirit of "Before you say anything incorrect, rather talk to us."

How does the system of Scientology work, which is characterized by manipulation and dependency?

The basic priniciple is the principle of redefinition. They're talking about freedom the entire time. But freedom means subjection under their technology. Freedom means to become "Clear". But "Clear" means that you are apathetic to influences from the outside world and you're only open to scientological working orders.

In your film you portray how a family gets into the system of Scientology. What were your ideas and thoughts when you constructed your story?

The most important thing for me and at the same time the biggest hurdle I had to overcome was that you had to somehow develop some kind of empathy for the main character Frank, without the audience thinking: This couldn't happen to me. Because in that case you would think: Sure, this guy has a huge problem and I haven't, so it won't happen to me. Or to put this very directly: Only folks with mental issues join this.

How close is your film to reality?

What you're seeing in our film really happened in this or another way, wespoke with different ex-members. Of course we had to be extremely careful not to violate any personal rights [[of people involved]]. But the practices that we show - including the forms of intimidation, the harassment, the destruction of family, these RPF camps - they exist, there is research on this, it happens just that way. And worse. We really held ourselves back in order to prevent any possibility of a lawsuit.

The system of Scientology is directed towards the total efficiency of man. Isn't there a connection to our modern [performance society]?

You are completely right. Everyone has to make sure that he as a machine works even more perfectly. Basically, today's world is more receptive to scientology than the world of 20 years ago, when we still were strongly influenced by conceptions of freedom, against subjection, against authorities. We're living in a culture today in which everyone is expected to work harder on themselves. The demands are extreme. All of this is of benefit to a system that demands perfection. Under that aspect I think the film really touches upon current issues.

In Germany, Scientology has been monitored since 1997 by the Office for Protection of the Contitution. Procedures directed at a ban, such as those considered in France, haven't been undertaken here. Should Scientology be banned in Germany?

Yes, the organization is anti-constitutional in word and deed.
In other news concerning the film and Scientology's reaction: According to an article by Kölner Stadtanzeiger, at the Berlin headquarters of Scientology "bomb and death threats" against Scientology were mentioned, which had been caused by the "unprecedented campaign of defamation by the ARD".
Die Suche nach der Wahrheit - Kölner Stadt-Anzeiger
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« Reply #7 on: March 27, 2010, 02:12:35 PM »

                      Hamburg Symposium 2010 26th-27th Post Game
Okay it just started.

We have here:

    * Jessie Prince
    * Marc Headley
    * Amy Scobee
    * Hana Withfield
    * Jerry Withfield (former involved with Narconon, today deprogrammer)
    * Markus Stuckenbrock
    * Wilfried Handl


We´re here, filling half the room. The Rest is Press and some public.

We have about 4 Cameras here, and we try to tape as much as we can.

Follow the thread.  Great stuff.

http://forums.whyweprotest.net/281-europe/hamburg-symposium-2010-26th-27th-post-game-64518/#post1206338
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« Reply #8 on: March 28, 2010, 09:56:49 AM »

Quick and dirty write-up of Hana Eltringham Whitfield's speech up at Infinite Complacency now.

There is stuff here even I didn`t know.


http://infinitecomplacency.blogspot.com/2010/03/17-tracing-it-back-to-source.html
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« Reply #9 on: March 28, 2010, 10:25:01 AM »

                        MUST SEE !!!

Youtube vids of the Hamburg symposium are up

Find the links here...

http://forums.whyweprotest.net/281-europe/hamburg-symposium-2010-26th-27th-post-game-64518/6/
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« Reply #10 on: March 28, 2010, 07:33:16 PM »

Videos and transcripts nicely laid out here...

http://forums.whyweprotest.net/42-english/hamburg-symposium-2010-videos-transcripts-64577/
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« Reply #11 on: April 01, 2010, 08:34:05 PM »

 Default  "German TV drama re-opens debate on banning Scientology"
German TV drama reopens debate on banning Scientology | Germany | Deutsche Welle | 01.04.2010

Quote:
Scientology has no more than 6,000 members in Germany
Quote:
German public broadcaster ARD touted its first film on Scientology as a genuine look behind the scenes. But representatives of the organization branded it a media-driven slander campaign.
Quote:
The first-ever German television drama about Scientology has triggered a renewed public debate over whether politicians should ban the organization. Millions of viewers tuned in to the film "Until Nothing's Left" ("Bis nichts mehr bleibt") on Wednesday night.
snip
Quote:
Scientology itself is not amused about the film at all. The organization criticized what it called "campaign journalism" by public broadcaster ARD. Spokesman Juerg Stettler added that the group had produced their own documentary film to dispel 'misleading' elements of the programme.
click through for full article

http://www.dw-world.de/dw/article/0,,5416627,00.html
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« Reply #12 on: April 02, 2010, 04:36:47 PM »

               Anti-Scientology drama a ratings hit for ARD
German TV movie 'Till Faith Do Us Part' based on real events

By Scott Roxborough

April 1, 2010, 07:03 AM ET
COLOGNE, Germany -- A German TV-movie about Scientology that claims to reveal the dark side of the organization was a huge ratings hit for public broadcaster ARD, with 8.7 million viewers tuning in Wednesday night, a 27% market share.

Germany has long been at odds with Scientology. Most here view the organization with suspicion. During the shooting of Brian Singer's war film "Valkyrie" in Berlin, famed Scientologist Tom Cruise was savaged in the German press for his beliefs.

The ARD film, "Till Faith Do Us Part" is a drama inspired by a real events. It focuses on a young couple in Hamburg. They both join Scientology. The husband becomes disenchanted as the group takes his money and brainwashes his wife. They separate and he begin a legal battle over the custody of their young child.

"Scientology is not a religion, it is a dangerous organization with social darwinistic designs," ARD spokesman Lars Jakob told THR.

Producers Teamworx based the story on real events and testimony from former Scientology members. They shot "Till Faith Do Us Part" in secret, fearing legal challenges from the group. Teamworx was also careful to label the film a drama, not a docu-drama, and say the story is not directly based on any living person.

Scientology has not sued ARD but on Wednesday they posted their own documentary online at www.scientology-tv.de which claims to tell the true story behind the film. In the video, a Scientology member interviews a mother and son, both Scientologists, about a custody battle in 2002/2003. They blame Hamburg politician Ursula Caberta, a vehement anti-Scientology activist and advisor on "Til Faith Do Us Part," for forcing the legal confrontation and destroying their family.

Telepool is handling world sales of "Till Faith Do Us Part" and will present the film to buyers at MIP-TV.




http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/hr/content_display/news/e3ice1c355368464e5c4080fbe013d54503
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« Reply #13 on: April 12, 2010, 12:13:59 AM »

German documentary... subtitled  ... on Scientology.
9 minutes 8 seconds. (Part one.)

Part one of five.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RhbAaNx016E

All five parts here...

http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?t=17396
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« Reply #14 on: April 13, 2010, 04:46:24 PM »

 Scilons Campaigning against German Film
Don't let the Scilons do all the voting, vote JA

Once again the Internet backfires on Slappy and crew.

Below is an email sent to me by a Scilon:



Vote NO (Nein).



An entheta film was made In Germany against Scientology.

The question being asked is: ‘Are you in favor of prohibiting Scientology Organizations?’.



1. Click on the link below

2. vote Nein (NO)

3. click on "Ergenbnis"


4. please forward this e-mail to other Scientologists.

--------------------------------------------------------------
Come on you anons. Takes less than 30 seconds.

Go here and vote JA  JA = yes. I`m in favour of banning scio


http://www.welt.de/fernsehen/article...B#vote_4996912

Scio is winning by a large margin.... as of Tuesday 13th April
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