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Ididntcomeback
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« on: November 02, 2009, 08:42:01 AM »

                     Scientology takes another giant body blow.


Oct 31, 2009

Story and video here...

This is history in the making.
The most dangerous cult the world has ever seen is
being dismantled by a "bunch of kids" on the internet.

The implications of this send chills down my spine.
Think about it....


http://www.tampabay.com/news/scientology/article1048134.ece
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« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2009, 10:09:49 AM »

                                    It's a three part series:


Quote:
NEW: Part three
Chapter 1

* Chased by their church
Hubbard said to let people leave scientology if they wanted, But make sure they leave with no secrets. Under David Miscavige, protecting secrets is paramount.
* "I just want to get on with my life" after Scientology
* From Scientology's files
* L. Ron Hubbard on 'Leaving and leaves'
* Who's who in this installment
* Scientology glossary, lingo, acronyms
* Scientology's Response
The entire 10-page response

Chapter 2

* Coming Monday:
What happened in Vegas
Some staffers who left the church were spied on. The story of a group of former Scientologists who were infiltrated for years.

Chapter 3

* Coming Tuesday
Don Jason's run
Once the No. 2 church officer in Clearwater, Don Jason ran and wound up in a locked cabin aboard the church cruise ship, the Freewinds. The story of an ingenious escape.
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« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2009, 04:19:34 PM »

Sixteen years later, Betsy Perkins is sobbing as she talks about the day she ran away from Scientology. • "I thought I was handing in my ticket to eternity," she says. • Now 56, a graphic artist in Dallas, she says she is going public to offer her own "first-hand account of what happened to a person who was in there." • She spent 17 years in Scientology's work force, the Sea Org, moved by the church's mantra that Scientologists held the future of the planet in their hands. • She tells of a life filled with intense repetition of Scientology's precepts and "ethics" and a grueling lifestyle where Sea Org members constantly needed to prove their fealty to the church. If your bosses had doubts about your performance or your thoughts, you faced humiliating work and periods of sleep deprivation. • But when eternal salvation is the reward, Perkins said, you come to believe it is all worth it. Even when she decided she couldn't take it anymore and ran from the Sea Org, she fretted she was doing something terrible. • "If anybody had come and talked to me, I would have gone (back). I would have gone willingly," she says. "Anybody could have taken me back. Easily ... I was so scared." • Telling her story to the Times by phone from her office, rattled her. "I am sitting in a conference room and I am shaking now," she said. • It is a story that began in May 1977.

Betsy was 23, a maid at Scientology's Fort Harrison Hotel in Clearwater. She had dropped out of the University of New Mexico to follow a big, blond British guy into the church. She married Chris Byrne three months after signing her billion-year Sea Org contract.

On May 7, her church told her she was evil.

During a "security check'' about organizational matters, she answered a question the wrong way, causing the auditor's e-meter needle to slap erratically. A "rock slam,'' it meant she had a hidden evil purpose.

Her superiors assigned her to the Rehabilitation Project Force, a work detail for Sea Org members in need of reform. She and her RPF crew mates spent five hours a day in sec checks and ethics counseling.

"You are told that all of your ideals, all of your goals, all of the things you believe in are really being driven by underlying evil and that you are so evil you have to be removed from your husband, your group, your organization, everything.''

She was told she was in a low ethical condition. "The only way to get out … is to take responsibility for your crimes. At that time, I didn't know what my crimes were, except that somehow I was suppressive toward humanity.''

She identified her evil actions, such as inflating an accomplishment or committing a bad act in a prior life. In follow-up counseling, she learned to "close down counter thoughts'' and purge her evil. After 1 ½ years, a review panel determined her original "rock slam'' reading and others were misread. She returned to her job on the housekeeping staff.

• • •  Continued here...

http://www.tampabay.com/news/scientology/article1048131.ece
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« Reply #3 on: November 03, 2009, 07:37:15 AM »

          Media picks up the St Petersburg times story


Scientology: You Can Check Out Anytime You Like, But You Can Never Leave




The St. Petersburg Times continues its impressive investigation into Scientology that it started publishing this summer with a new three-part series that began yesterday. The new series focuses on the ways the paranoid church makes it extremely difficult for staff members to leave, particularly if they were high up in the organization's hierarchy. When L. Ron Hubbard, Scientology's founder, was alive, certain precautions were taken, but people were allowed to leave. That began to change when David Miscavige took over and became obsessed with the thought that those who leave would reveal church secrets. The church obviously categorically denies everything, but the paper talked to defectors who organized pursuits and others who were pursued. The paper paints a clear picture of the way the organization operates when it feels threatened. Scientology spares no expenses to pursue runaways with the help of a vast database of personal information about staffer's lives—including bank accounts—and then convince them to come back with threats that they're risking their "eternity." Once they're coerced to return, they have to face a grueling ordeal of interrogations, coupled with a dose of humiliation, and manual labor. They are also abandoned by their family and friends. When those who defect are seen as particularly important—like those described in today's installment—the church has even paid for undercover agents to spy on the runaways, and bankrolled entire trips to Mexico and business ventures in Australia just to make sure they would be far away enough and not cause any trouble.

http://slatest.slate.com/id/2234312/entry/3/

And another

http://glosslip.com/2009/11/02/once-again-the-st-petesburg-times-rips-scientology-a-new-one-in-a-scathing-three-part-series/

And another...

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/11/02/church-of-scientology-cha_n_342033.html

http://www.thefirstpost.co.uk/55495,news-comment,news-politics,tales-of-church-scientology-apostates-are-a-warning-to-peaches-geldof

They just keep coming...
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« Reply #4 on: November 04, 2009, 06:21:02 AM »

What is that banging noise I hear?.... Oh, it's another nail going in the coffin...

Rot in hell Scientology!
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« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2009, 07:48:23 PM »


  My old boss... Don Jason

In print and on video.


http://www.tampabay.com/news/scientology/don-jasons-route-out-of-scientology/1048121

http://www.tampabay.com/news/scientology/man-overboard-to-leave-scientology-don-jason-had-to-jump-off-a-ship/1048124
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« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2009, 10:48:21 PM »

                       Reality is closing in.

The PR flaps that used to hit Scientology once a year are now happening
once a day. And it`s getting worse.
For those of you still in. I want to assure you that you are the victims
of very sophisticated mind control. You don`t think so ???

That`s how good it is !!!

The one thing you can use to test this is to ask yourself
why you are paranoid about receiving data about Scientology from
any source other than Scientology itself.

Particularly since as a comm course graduate you can confront anything.

When it all falls apart.. which I assure you is happening, you`ll say
"but if I knew all this, I would have walked out."

When you are brought to account for your illegal and immoral actions
taken for the greatest good.... You`ll say "But I was only doing my job."

Take back your own identity now.
Stop asking "What would Ron do ?"
Start asking " Do the critics of Scientology have any valid points ?"

Time is running out .

                 Investigation overdue: SP Times Editorial

Investigation overdue - St. Petersburg Times Editorial - 8th Nov 2009


Quote:
When workers for the Church of Scientology sign a contract agreeing to serve in the church's Sea Organization for "the next billion years," the church can twist that agreement into a license to harass its workers, track them down if they leave and pressure them to return. What true church, what caring employer, would trample on the dignity and free choices of its own members in such a way? And what are authorities going to do about it?

[...]

The Church of Scientology trumpets its global reach and expansions in communities large and small across America. Its presence can be disruptive, as Clearwater has learned since the church secretly moved in and established its spiritual headquarters in the city more than 25 years ago. Government cannot afford to be complacent, and those politicians and community leaders who have normalized relations with Scientology can no longer claim ignorance about the nature of the church and the treatment of its workers.

  http://forums.whyweprotest.net/312-st-petersburg-times-expose/investigation-overdue-sp-times-editorial-56030/#post1056973
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« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2009, 10:51:01 PM »

St Petersburg Times calls the cult out yet again.

14 th November 2009.

     Caught between Scientology and her husband, Annie Tidman chose the church

By Thomas C. Tobin and Joe Childs, Times Staff Writers
Posted: Nov 14, 2009 06:30 AM

This Annie,,,,  IS ANNIE BROEKER !!!

She and Pat Broeker are the keys to solving the  mysterious death of L Ron Hubbard and the ascension to power of David Miscavige.

Miscavige has silenced these two for twenty three years.

Here is the article...and photos

http://tampabay.com/news/scientology/article1048130.ece



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« Reply #8 on: January 11, 2010, 12:20:57 AM »


Looks like the SP times is gearing up to do another round with the cult...

Here is a post by Larry Brennan...

It may be a week from Sunday instead of tomorrow's edition but brace for more major coverage from the St Pete Times. I believe that the dwarf and his attorneys already have what the St Pete Times is publishing next and this Freedumb is their idea of a response. (SP Times sends them the story ahead of time for comment, etc. and the best Slappy can do is reply with foot nukes). Gawd I love this!

Also, IMHO brace for more from the SP Times after this next round as well. (Not to mention more TV coverage internationally IMHO).

I do believe that the SP Times is just getting warmed up:)

Larry Brennan.

http://forums.whyweprotest.net/15-media/new-freedumb-newspaper-mass-mailing-tampa-bay-1-9-10-a-59536/2/
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« Reply #9 on: January 24, 2010, 07:14:30 PM »

  Okay ....Here it goes.

You`ll love this...

http://www.tampabay.com/specials/2010/reports/scientology_anderson/

In case you have missed some of the action as it`s unfolded...

http://www.tampabay.com/specials/2009/reports/project/
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« Reply #10 on: January 25, 2010, 07:46:19 AM »

Read the Tampa bay newspaper current edition.
Photo of Miscavige and wife , Shelly, with Larry Anderson.
Here...
http://www.tampabay.com/news/scientology/he-wants-his-money-back/1067720
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« Reply #11 on: January 25, 2010, 03:06:50 PM »

                      Message from Larry Anderson...

I told Larry that Anons were asking about whether he did the voiceover for the CoS video which labelled Anons as terrorists and said we had sent death threats, etc.

His response:


Quote:
Absolutely not. In fact, I'm not even aware what video they are referring to. People apparently aren't fully grasping that for the last 4-5 years the Church has been very concerned about me and no doubt feared this day might come. Hence, I was most definitely off their "casting roster"; instead my status was more on the order of emergency "salvage mode" due to my expressed concerns about Scientology and those running the Church. Management and OSA were doing all they could to "handle" me and were very aware I was walking a narrow tightrope. I've been someone the CO$ has considered "dangerous" for several years now (well before Anonymous even existed) and they certainly weren't about to ask me to be a key person in any further Scientology videos or audio recordings for fear of the backfire potential (like it has with Orientation).

BTW, please impart to those on WWP and ESMB that I have been reading the threads and have been moved to "watery eyes" (no actual tear has dripped however... yet) by the support and heartfelt things they have been saying. Funny thing is -- I haven't even read the article yet! Only the posts! When it hit the St. Pete Times last night I was leaving to attend a friend's birthday party and didn't get home until so late that I quickly read some of the BB reactions and went to bed (I wanted to read the article with a clear mind and having had my coffee!). So now it's late morning and all I've done so far is catch up on the threads. Gonna have some late breakfast and get to the article in an hour or so.

I have to tell you these people are very creative and have had me in stitches with their commentary on the photo of me, DM and his missing wife, Shelley. The Howdy Doody, Edgar Bergen & Charlie McCarthy and most especially the Alfred E. Neuman graphics had me rolling. I can't believe DM actually sent me that picture himself, after the event, with a nice note saying how much they enjoyed seeing me, etc. etc. Apparently he had no problems with his appearance and new hairstyle. Wonder if he still thinks that now, a decade later.

I have much more to say on this and will likely sign up to both ESMB and WWP soon (I've been lurking for several years) to express my gratitude and provide additional info that the Times report wasn't willing to print.

Thanks again to all for your kind words.
Would someone mind cross-posting to ESMB, please?

Larry.

http://forums.whyweprotest.net/312-st-petersburg-times-expose/message-larry-anderson-60256/

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« Reply #12 on: February 22, 2010, 03:49:15 PM »

             Scientology Church hires reporters to investigate newspaper

Article from The Washington Post

This could backfire badly for the cult. Really badly.
Hope the Investigators have cashed their cheques.

Look at Miscavige`s face. The tone of covert hostility has been
demonstrated with a picture of the Mona Lisa in Scio courses.
Miscavige just posed for a better one.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/02/21/AR2010022103692.html?hpid=news-col-blog
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« Reply #13 on: February 24, 2010, 04:53:17 PM »

                      On Taking the Scientologists' Shilling
                                    CHIGAGO READER

Posted by Michael Miner on Tue, Feb 23, 2010 at 6:43 PM

Howard Kurtz of the Washington Post reported this week that three experienced and reputable journalists recently were paid by the Church of Scientology to examine a newspaper the Scientologists despise, the St. Petersburg Times.

The reporters in the project were Russell Carollo, who won a Pulitzer for investigative journalism at Dayton, Ohio's Daily News in 1998, and Christopher Szechenyi, formerly a producer at 60 Minutes. The product's editor was Steve Weinberg, former executive director of Investigative Reporters and Editors and a longtime faculty member of the University of Missouri School of Journalism.

Weinberg told Kurtz he was paid $5,000 for his work, which was "kind of like editing a Columbia Journalism Review piece." The project was an "unusual situation" and "certainly [not] something just any reporter would do." But "my role was more limited, and I can certainly use the money these days." He said the Scientologists can put the report "in a drawer" if they wish, but if they publish it must publish it in full.

In a joint statement to Kurtz, Carollo and Czecheny said they hesitated to take the job and "that's why we insisted on being paid in full before we started our work, total editorial independence and having someone with the reputation of Steve Weinberg involved."

So what we have here is the Scientologists hiring top journalists to bolster their counterattack against the journalists who have been plaguing them for decades. No surprise — the Times wasn't very happy with the situation and wouldn't cooperate with Carollo and Czecheny. "I was surprised and disappointed that journalists who I understand to have an extensive background in investigative reporting would think it's appropriate to ask me or our news organization to talk about that reporting while (a) it's ongoing, and (b) while they're being paid to ask these questions by the very subjects of our reporting," Times executive editor Neil Brown told Kurtz.

Is there a whiff of a sense of betrayal in Brown's comment? Carollo and Czecheny could hardly wait until the reporting was no longer ongoing — the Times won a Pulitzer in 1980 for a series of articles on how the Scientologists had set up shop in nearby Clearwater, Florida, its international headquarters, and its been preoccupied by the church ever since. Last June the paper ran a series of three exceptionally long articles, "Scientology: The Truth Rundown," a narrative — based on the recollections of two former top officers — of how "physical violence permeated Scientology's international management team."

Last month brought another lengthy expose — about the so-far futile efforts of a prominent former spokesman for the Scientologists to recover some $120,000 he'd prepaid for programs he would never take because he'd decided to leave the church.

As for who's paying whom to do what, would this be an issue if instead of journalists for hire we were discussing lawyers for hire? A team of top-flight attorneys who consider the Scientologists a wacko cult could represent them in court against equally distinguished practitioners who sing the Times's praises to a judge but wouldn't read the paper on a bet. That could happen and no questions would be raised about what's appropriate conduct and what isn't.

But journalists are touchier than lawyers. We tell our children we afflict the rich and powerful, not represent them. If the Church of Scientology is the plucky but outgunned underdog in its long war with the mighty Times, that's only in the war being fought in its imagination.

The Scientologists hardly needed Weinberg, Carollo, and Szechenyi in order to mount a defense against the Times. They're old hands at counterattacks. As Kurtz noted, their magazine Freedom "has repeatedly assailed" the Times. It just produced a "special report" that takes readers "inside the St. Petersburg Times." The front-page headline: "STEAL, BRIBE AND SPY."

The longest story in the package was written by Jim Lynch, yet another veteran journalist who took the Scientologists' shilling. When I wrote about Lynch last October he was dissecting the Sun-Times Media Group for me as he'd gotten to know it as editor and publisher of its Naperville Sun from February 2006 to June 2008. When the STMG let him go, he moved to Florida and looked for work.

Lynch's story in Freedom is headlined, "An Outsider's View of Scientology in Clearwater / What happens when an independent journalist takes an objective look at St. Petersburg Times coverage of the Church of Scientology?"

What happened is that Lynch disapproved of it. He called it "perhaps the most egregious and ethically challenged series of the year." He tells me, "You sort of doubt the veracity of sources when there's no corroboration. If a guy said he had the shit beaten out of him, why didn't he file a police report. Why didn't he file a lawsuit? Come on!"

The Times series has answers to those questions, but they are answers that hang on our ability to believe that some people so totally surrender their egos to wills stronger than their own that — when their masters treat them like whipped dogs — they convince themselves they have it coming. This is an easy premise to embrace if you're telling a terrific story that hangs on it, and it's just as easy to reject if you want to knock the story down.

Lynch wrote that "it defies logic" that the Times published its "Truth Rundown" series without waiting a few days longer for a promised interview with the head of the Church of Scientology, David Muscavige, to take place. The series described Muscavige as a mesmerizing bully and sadist. "What was the rush to print before Miscavige could be interviewed?" Lynch wondered. "And since he wasn't, could this be construed as a rush to judgment?"

It's a question "Truth Rundown" could have done a better job of anticipating. The series did say this: "On May 13, the Times asked to interview Miscavige, in person or by phone, and renewed the request repeatedly the past five weeks. Church officials said Miscavige's schedule would not permit an interview before July." So apparently the Times concluded that despite the promises it was getting the runaround.

Lynch, who lives in Boca Raton, Florida, spent two weeks in Clearwater reporting and writing the story in Freedom. He spent additioinal time working on a more complicated second piece — not yet published — about the Times's relationship with the not-for-profit Poynter Institute that owns it. Much of his first story consists of chats with local people who describe the Scientologists as solid citizens who are good for the community. "They're involved in a lot of programs and invest a lot of money," says a former county commissioner who became a Tampa developer. "I think they've made a positive impact." Says an unnamed police officer, "Nope, never had any issues with them."

But from the Times, and only from the Times, Lynch spotted "long ingrained hostility." (He says nobody there would talk to him either.)

Lynch didn't know anything about the other project until I sent him Howard Kurtz's story. "This was kept at arm's length," he says. "I can certainly use the money," Steve Weinberg had told Kurtz. "That's a quote I would not have used," says Lynch, and not only because he thinks it was a dumb thing to say. "I didn't necessarily do this for the money. I've always had an interest in religion and this gave me a good way to examine a religion I never had a chance to examine." However, Lynch also says that when he took the job he made it clear to the Scientologists he wouldn't stand for any proselytizing, and as long as they understood that he didn't care what they believed. "I told them, I said, 'Look, I happen to be a Catholic. My wife's Jewish. My views on religion are if people want to worship at Mayan temples, fine with me. You guys, albeit a nontraditional religion, are a religion under the auspices of the U.S. Constitution."

Lynch kept an eye on the Internet reaction to Kurtz's story, and it didn't surprise him. "I love the way the aggregators jumped on these guys, like they betrayed the nobility of journalism and it's like the end of the world. It's another instance of journalistic self-flagellation. I've never understood any industry that beats itself up like journalism does. The truth is, journalism is a for-profit enterprise like anything else."

As for that, he doesn't want to say what the Scientologists paid him. But he asks, "Just don't make me look like a shill for Scientology." And he adds, "Say hello to my pals at the Sun-Times. You can stick that in there too, all right."

http://www.chicagoreader.com/TheBlog/archives/2010/02/23/on-taking-the-scientologists-shilling
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« Reply #14 on: February 28, 2010, 10:51:15 AM »

 Reporters paid by Scientologists to investigate St. Pete Times 'proud of the work we did'

"We took great care in insuring that our work was free of all outside interference by any entity, including the Church of Scientology," say Christopher Szechenyi, Steve Weinberg and Russell Carollo. Neil Brown, executive editor of Poynter's St. Petersburg Times, refused to answer their questions, and says that "only upon pressing them, found out they were being paid ... by the Church of Scientology." || Related.
Posted at 9:57 AM on Feb. 26, 2010


http://www.poynter.org/column.asp?id=45&aid=178550

Feedback...

Homework on subjects
Posted by Chuck Beatty 2/27/2010 10:14:08 AM

"One hires a reporter who gets to work thinking up ideas and turning out releases." -L. Ron Hubbard, "HOW TO HANDLE BLACK PROPAGANDA" church offi... "One hires a reporter who gets to work thinking up ideas and turning out releases." -L. Ron Hubbard, "HOW TO HANDLE BLACK PROPAGANDA" church official policy, published 21 Nov 1972. It is Scientology church scriptures to use reporters to do this type of work defending Scientology. The bottom line is David Miscavige beat up staff, the St. Pete Times followed the story, found over a dozen people who corroborated the staff to staff violence story. Scientology's largest biggest downside is the top staff mentality, likened to Stockholm Syndrome or abused spouse syndrome, the climate of staff to staff violence that David Miscavige condoned and fueled. No reporter nor new religion scholar has had the guts to take up this history of Scientology, except two newspapers, the St. Pete Times and an Oregon newspaper briefly in their article on Jeff Hawkins, which was the first breaking of the staff to staff upper ranks Scientology violence story. We sadly lack scholars and reporters sufficiently knowledgeable of Hubbard's church scriptures and of the many critical books and even of the 1968 Granada Productions filmed interview with L. Ron Hubbard, to poke through L. Ron Hubbard's own blatant lying. Chuck Beatty, ex Scientology staffer 1975-2003. Pittsburgh, 412-260-1170. I'll help any journlist or researcher wishing to start digging into Hubbard's scriptures for sniffing out the Hubbard marching orders that unfortunately Scientologists are obligated to continue to perpetrate on society which in turn causes the recurring press stories and backlash.
chuckbeatty77@aol.com
http://chuckbeatty77.webs.com/index.htm


Don't call it journalism
Posted by Betty Medsger 2/26/2010 4:24:25 PM

It's all right for those three journalists to conduct an investigation for Scientologists. They just shouldn't call it journalism. Call it an inv... It's all right for those three journalists to conduct an investigation for Scientologists. They just shouldn't call it journalism. Call it an investigation on behalf of a paying client. It's a shame that Steve Weinberg compared their taking money form Scientologists to investigate an organization Scientologists are suing to the new journalism organizations that are raising money from foundations to support journalism. Some people have suggested that those news organizations are going to have a hard time being independent of their funding sources. But most are trying desperately to be independent. Weinberg's claim that this project paid for by Scientology is in the same ballpark as those foundation-funded new groups just made it more difficult for them to claim integrity.

http://www.poynter.org/article_feedback/article_feedback_list.asp?id=178550
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