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« Reply #90 on: November 06, 2012, 10:23:47 PM »

                              Paul Thomas Anderson reveals unseen scenes from 'The Master'


By Mark Olsen

November 5, 2012, 11:03 a.m.

Having just screened Judd Apatow’s upcoming comedy of upscale anxiety, "This Is 40," on Thursday night with the filmmaker in attendance, Film Independent at LACMA played host the following evening to a very different American auteur: Paul Thomas Anderson.

The writer-director engaged in a conversation after a showing of John Huston's World War II-era short films "The Battle of San Pietro" and "Let There Be Light" to discuss their influence on his latest film, "The Master."

"The Master" may have already faded at the box office and in the minds of some awards-watchers, but judging from the packed house of people whose vintage-inspired dress looked like they shopped straight from the collection of Freddie Quell (the film's main character, played by Joaquin Phoenix), it will live on with its passionate admirers.

PHOTOS: Deconstructing 'The Master'

Though Anderson has lately cultivated a certain mystique around himself, in conversation with Film Independent curator Elvis Mitchell he was warm, witty and charming while articulating his own writing process and influences.

Huston's two short films (both available for viewing online) deal unflinchingly with the impact of combat on soldiers' psyches and emotional health. It was easy to see why they were long kept from public view. The long interview sequences with returning servicemen in "Let There Be Light," which Anderson said he first saw on YouTube, are harrowing for their emotional directness in showing the effect of war on men.

"A lot of this informed the script for 'The Master' before I saw ['Let There Be Light']," Anderson said, "but it was that kind of lucky thing that helps verify decisions that you've made, [when] you find it somewhere else. It just helps you feel like you're on the right track."

THE ENVELOPE: Who's ahead in the awards race?

An unexpected question about the documentary "Baraka" prompted a rather amusing series of ideas from Anderson, including thoughts on Michael Jackson's notorious pet Bubbles and a rather unlikely distillation of a theme from "The Master" regarding the character of Quell.

"C'mon, you can’t put diapers on a monkey," Anderson said of how the essential nature of man and beast alike can perhaps not be changed.

Though Anderson has at times been cagey in discussions of how Philip Seymour Hoffman's "Master" character of Lancaster Dodd was inspired by Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard, on Friday night he was the one who brought the topic up.

PHOTOS: Anderson talks 'The Master'

“For ‘The Master,’ obviously it helped to be into ideas that eventually got into L. Ron Hubbard’s head and Dianetics,” he said, “sort of how to work with mental illness, how to work with the mind, that was the kind of thing he got into. And I think he did spend time in naval hospitals, so he was obviously around all that kind of stuff. So what he was doing was not an entirely made-up thing, it was kind of around this stuff and funneling it into what he was working on.”

At the evening’s start, Mitchell announced there would be a surprise showing of 20 minutes of “heretofore unseen” scenes from “The Master.” In his introduction, Anderson said, “Lower your expectations, lower them way down,” and this seemed to hold true when the disc containing whatever was to be shown didn’t initially work properly, the image freezing and skipping after a few seconds.

After two attempts to fix the problems, Anderson and Mitchell came back on stage to have a brief conversation about what the audience would have seen -- a compilation of alternate takes and outtakes that Anderson is putting together for likely inclusion on the film’s DVD release.

After they left the stage, a third attempt to get the scenes played worked. They played like something of a dream contraction of the film itself, establishing Freddie as a drifting loner even while in the Navy. He does a little jig in a bathroom after making a drink, falls asleep against a woman’s bare breast and misses his ship’s departure.

There is a rather dazzling moment in which Freddie opens a wooden box said to contain Dodd’s unpublished manuscript of a book that has the power to kill men who read it. Flames leap from the box, and Freddie stares at it intently before calming closely the lid. Freddie is bequeathed a special jacket and named first lieutenant of “The Cause.”

He and Dodd dance together at a party. Freddie engages in dialogue with the character played by Laura Dern. The scenes concluded with a genuine blooper, as Hoffman and Phoenix repeatedly crack up over Hoffman’s inability to deliver a line on the “minty flavor” of Kool cigarettes with a straight face.

“There was a lot of talk and discussion about what doesn’t need to be in the movie,” Anderson said before the scenes screened.

“In the comfort of an editing room, you should be allowed to see what film you’re making and what you can do without,” he added. “It’s not any fun to go in there knowing exactly what you want to put in and go and do it. That would be dull. This was really kind of fun, to just sort of mess around with the film and see what we wanted to do.”

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/movies/moviesnow/la-et-mn-paul-thomas-anderson-the-master-unseen-scenes-20121103,0,4679035.story
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« Reply #91 on: November 11, 2012, 07:27:39 AM »

                       Skyfall meets Lincoln at weekend box office: here’s why


LOS ANGELES (TheWrap.com) – On the face of it, Skyfall and Lincoln have little in common when they hit theatres in the U.S. on Friday. One is a high-octane action film expected to garner the biggest box office in the 50-year-history of the James Bond franchise. The other is a talky, slow saga of the country’s 16th president that is considered a front-runner in the Academy Awards Best Picture category.
But together they have Hollywood sitting up and taking notice. And with rival studios having cleared out the weekend to avoid Bond’s box office, nearly all the attention will be focused on these two films.
Skyfall, showing at 3,500 theatres, is looking for a $67 million US opening weekend, according to Sony, but that’s clearly a lowball number. Industry analysts and executives at rival studios say $75 million to $85 million is more likely. And already it’s on track to be the first Bond film to crack $600 million overseas.....

.......Paul Thomas Anderson’s Scientology-inspired tale The Master posted the year’s biggest specialty box-office opening to date, taking in $736,311 from five theaters in New York and Los Angeles on Sept. 14. That’s a $147,262 per-screen average for the Weinstein Company release. The movie has since lost box-office steam and has an overall domestic gross of $15.5 million......

http://o.canada.com/2012/11/10/skyfall-meets-lincoln-at-weekend-box-office-heres-why/
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« Reply #92 on: November 13, 2012, 11:53:32 AM »

Movies
                           Exclusive: Amy Adams interview: 'The Master is about more than Scientology'

Published Monday, Nov 12 2012,

http://www.digitalspy.co.uk/movies/interviews/a435398/amy-adams-interview-the-master-is-about-more-than-scientology.html
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« Reply #93 on: November 27, 2012, 10:15:50 PM »

                             Paul Thomas Anderson Discusses ‘The Master’ During Hour-Long Q&A

Paul Thomas Anderson isn’t the kind of guy to do Q&As for his films, but recently the director attended a screening of his latest work, ‘The Master,’ in Australia and treated audience members to a rare hour-long Q&A.

‘The Master’ premiered a few months ago and since then the unnerving film has created quite a divide in the critical community, but then again, some of the most important films often do. The film, which follows a drifter as he joins up with a visionary who’s started his own religion, was loosely based on Scientology and its creator, L. Ron Hubbard. Most folks who disliked the film seemed to be disappointed with how the film failed to have anything to say about Scientology, but that’s not really the point of the story — the themes of master and servant, man as animal, and whether or not such primitively-driven humans can be trained or un-trained are compelling, and far more interesting than a scathing look at a religion whose membership includes Tom Cruise.

Anyway! We really enjoyed this hour-long Q&A with Paul Thomas Anderson, in which he addresses the decision to shoot the film in 70mm — Anderson says that the decision was about his vision, and less about cost or difficulty, and we agree that his choice really transports you back to the era in which the film is set.

You can check out the Q&A below. Thanks to CinemaBlend for bringing it to our attention.

Video

http://screencrush.com/paul-thomas-anderson-discusses-the-master-during-hour-long-qa/
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« Reply #94 on: December 08, 2012, 04:16:05 PM »

  Oscar Campaign for “The Master” Sends out Scientology Parody Magazine

I almost thought that there was no Oscar campaign for Paul Thomas Anderson’s “The Master.” But today arrived a parody of a Scientology mailing promoting the film, which should be a Best Picture nominee and have three actor nominations as well. The Weinstein Company sent out a folded magazine on newsprint called “The Cause Footpath.” The Cause, of course, is the cult religion started by Lancaster Dodd, played by Philip Seymour Hoffman in a performance as good as Daniel Day Lewis’s Lincoln or Denzel Washington’s addicted pilot.

The Footpath is a fictional publication from Dodd– “The Weekly Newspaper for the Enlightened.” It mimics the annoying periodicals published by Scientology or Jehovah’s Witnesses “The Watchtower.” Very clever. Hoffman, Joaquin Phoenix and Amy Adams are shown on the cover. I’ve reproduced it twice here.

Inside TWC includes mostly the sterling reviews for the movie. The backpage is a long quote from Dodd, from Anderson’s original screenplay. There’s also a very witty fake 1949 article about Dodd and his wife Peggy (Amy Adams, Best Supporting Actress nominee without a doubt).

“The Master,” one of my favorite movies of 2012, is eligible for Best Picture, Best Director (Best Actor (Phoenix and/or Hoffman), Supporting Actress (Adams), Original Screenplay (Anderson) plus cinematography, editing, set design, costumes, art design.

I’m very torn about putting Hoffman into Supporting Actor. He is as much the lead as Phoenix. Lancaster Dodd is one of the greatest character inventions in modern movie history. I do think PSH is an absolute genius, in the league of Daniel Day Lewis and maybe just a couple other actors of this generation. (Don Cheadle and Ralph Fiennes are close.)

If you’re voting with any groups this month, don’t forget “The Master.” And I do believe “The Cause Footpath” will become a collector’s item overnight!

http://www.showbiz411.com/2012/12/07/oscar-campaign-for-the-master-sends-out-scientology-parody-magazine
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« Reply #95 on: December 14, 2012, 03:10:36 PM »

                                                  Film Picks: Top Ten in 2012
December 13, 2012 - By JP Spence

J.P. Spence is a film critic for the Topanga Messenger. He previously served as Editor in Chief for the Los Angeles Valley Star, where under his tenure the paper received the prestigious JACC Pacesetter Award. Spence is a five time JACC award winner and currently has his own website, wallamonger.com.

http://www.topangamessenger.com/story_detail.php?ArticleID=5763
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« Reply #96 on: December 15, 2012, 04:23:57 PM »

                                25 Favorites From a Year When 10 Aren’t Enough


......5. THE MASTER (Paul Thomas Anderson) Troubling and enigmatic, this movie — suggested by the early career of L. Ron Hubbard, the founder of Scientology — seems designed to be misunderstood. It tells the story of a damaged soul (Joaquin Phoenix) who seeks healing from a charismatic fraud and finds what he is looking for. .....

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/16/movies/a-o-scotts-25-best-films-of-2012.html?partner=rss&emc=rss&_r=0
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« Reply #97 on: December 20, 2012, 12:41:34 PM »

                AP critics Christy Lemire, David Germain and Jake Coyle pick the best movies of 2012

By: Christy Lemire, David Germain And Jake Coyle, The Associated Press

14/12/2012

....6. "The Master" — Paul Thomas Anderson, long a master himself of technique and tone, has created a startling, stunningly gorgeous film shot in lushly vibrant 70mm, with impeccable production design and powerful performances from stars Joaquin Phoenix, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Amy Adams. But this story of a wayward man and the charismatic cult leader who guides him — which may or may not have been inspired by Church of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard — is also his most ambitious film yet....

http://www.brandonsun.com/entertainment/breaking-news/ap-critics-christy-lemire-david-germain-and-jake-coyle-pick-the-best-movies-of-2012-183558241.html
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« Reply #98 on: December 28, 2012, 05:52:18 AM »

                                 VIDEO

     BBC`s top ten films of 2012


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-20798481

                                           The Oscars Issue

                                        A Director Continues His Quest

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/30/movies/awardsseason/paul-thomas-anderson-on-preparing-for-and-following-up-the-master.html?partner=rss&emc=rss&_r=0
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« Reply #99 on: December 29, 2012, 07:00:20 AM »

                                  KANSAS CITY, MO — The Screening Room

VIDEO

5. SEARCHING FOR SUGAR MAN
-The intriguing documentary “Searching for Sugar Man” was a real-life mystery exploring what happened to a brilliant 70s era folk-rock singer that many critics said topped Dylan. What the filmmakers discovered was stranger than fiction.
4. THE MASTER
-Although highly flawed, Paul Thomas Anderson’s look at a Scientology-like cult had two of the strongest performances of the year. The scenes between Joaquin Phoenix and Philip Seymour Hoffman are electric and the movie stuns inspite of its unsatisfying conclusion.

3. ZERO DARK THIRTY
-The CIA’s search for Osama bin Laden, from 9-11-2001 to the raid on his compound, gets a throrough cinematic examination in Katheryn Bigelow’s tense and engaging movie. It’s like a police procedural, but powerful and important.
2. LES MISERABLES
-This big screen adaptation of the Broadway musical is a beautifully produced and moving version of Victor Hugo’s classic about grace versus the law, set in 19th century France. Anne Hathway can dust off a spot on her mantle for her inevitable Oscar. Take Kleenex.
1. LIFE OF PI
-Although the 2001 bestselling novel was thought to be unfilmable, thanks to recent developments in cinematic technology and a daring filmmaker named Ang Lee, “The Life of Pi” is a visually stunning and absorbing movie experience. It’s both an exciting and ripping yarn and a thoughtful exploration of spirituality that’s worth seeing in 3-D

http://fox4kc.com/2012/12/28/the-screening-room-russs-top-5-films-of-2012/
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« Reply #100 on: January 11, 2013, 06:24:52 AM »

                        Academy awards nominees are listed here for 2013.

Lead actor

    Bradley Cooper in "Silver Linings Playbook"
    Daniel Day-Lewis in "Lincoln"
    Hugh Jackman in "Les Misérables"
    Joaquin Phoenix in "The Master"
    Denzel Washington in "Flight"

Supporting actor

    Alan Arkin in "Argo"
    Robert De Niro in "Silver Linings Playbook"
    Philip Seymour Hoffman in "The Master"
    Tommy Lee Jones in "Lincoln"
    Christoph Waltz in "Django Unchained"


Supporting actress

    Amy Adams in "The Master"
    Sally Field in "Lincoln"
    Anne Hathaway in "Les Misérables"
    Helen Hunt in "The Sessions"
    Jacki Weaver in "Silver Linings Playbook"

Biggest cunt

David Miscavige "The shrinking world of L Ron Hubbard"


http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/envelope/moviesnow/la-et-en-oscars-2013-nomination-list,0,1532667.story
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« Reply #101 on: January 13, 2013, 06:29:25 AM »

      The Master opens in selected  New Zealand cinemas on January 17.  (R13) 138 mins

                                          Disturbing yet a Great Film


 The Master is a Great Film, but in the way that dictators, geniuses and misanthropic artists are often described as "great" - that is to say, they may achieve remarkable aims but you wouldn't necessarily want to spend time with them.

In this vein, Paul Thomas Anderson's newest progeny (only his sixth feature film in an extremely illustrious career) is very hard to recommend. The PTA aficionados will see it without a second thought, and rightly so, and it has already topped various critics' polls around the world.

It boasts typically powerhouse performances (as did There Will Be Blood), focuses on intense, dysfunctional relationships (see Boogie Nights) and a wily, weaving storyline (Anderson's forte in Magnolia), though it leaves more questions than answers in its wake.

Yet for all its cleverness, the sumptuous production design, incredible photography, deeply realised characterisation and the underlying backstory of a cult based not-that-loosely on Scientology, The Master can be a disturbing watch, a sprawling mess at times, both utterly enthralling and unsettling.

Immediately assaulting us with a dissonant, ill-tempo soundtrack, the story begins with Joaquin Phoenix's alcoholic marine, Freddie Quell. Recently freed from military "service" in the South Pacific, we long to wash this man out of our hair as we watch him stumble from one ghastly situation to the next, in search of either rehabilitation or oblivion.

Phoenix hasn't played a likeable role since . . . well, ever, but damn he's good, his concave physicality and unpredictable outbursts brilliantly belying Freddie's awkwardness and inability to interact appropriately.

After yet another fuel-induced bender, Freddie stows away on a boat and chances on the opportunity for a whole new life, clutched under the avuncular armpit of Philip Seymour Hoffman's Master. Freddie is such a mess we feel palpable relief as soon as we see Hoffman is in charge (a PTA regular and one of the finest actors around).

Leader of a shady but ostensibly benevolent community called The Cause, Freddie becomes his perfect foil, concocting batches of moonshine while Master invites him to have some "informal processing" to soothe away the mental and emotional blemishes on Freddie's personal record.

With terrific support from Amy Adams as the Master's Lady Macbeth of a wife, and a cast of proper old-time faces, there are moments when you know you are watching pure film-making genius, and others when you wonder what it is all about. Overall, the effect is like that of a Bacon painting: a cacophony of horribleness, artfully done.

The Master opens in selected cinemas on January 17.  (R13) 138 mins

http://www.stuff.co.nz/entertainment/film/film-reviews/8158031/Disturbing-yet-a-Great-Film
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« Reply #102 on: January 16, 2013, 08:50:35 AM »

  If anyone can find a list of theaters where the Master will be screened and at what times, that would be great.  Please post here.

Buggered if I could find anything other than it opens tomorrow.

           http://www.viewauckland.co.nz/films/the-master-film-review-31290.html


Okay found something.

Starts at the Rialto in New Market today Auckland at  ,... wait for it......   "  8:45 PM SOLD OUT.

No screening times for future screenings posted at time of writing...
http://www.rialto.co.nz/movie/HO00005548/FILMCLUBSCREENINGTheMaster.aspx?cinemaidlist=R08&from=2013-01-18%2000:00&to=2013-01-19
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« Reply #103 on: February 15, 2013, 06:45:48 AM »

                        Oscars 2013: Did Scientology ruin The Master’s hopes for the Oscars?

Paul Thomas Anderson’s The Master was undoubtedly one of the most profoundly affecting films of 2012. Although it was partly based on the formation of the Church of Scientology by L Ron Hubbard, its focus ranged from the consequences of war on the mental health of soldiers, alcoholism and depression, and perhaps most poignantly, the intense and inexpressible love shared between the two principle figures. The acting was simply sublime, subsumed with gravitas but also exquisitely poised and nuanced. An initial interview scene between Philip Seymour Hoffman and Joaquin Phoenix resonates in the mind long after the end of the film due to the impactful nature of the actors’ performances that present real and tangible emotions for the viewer in a way that very few other films were able to do in 2012.

Therefore, it is perhaps surprising when one realises that The Master has done relatively poorly in the Oscar nominations. Philip Seymour Hoffman and Amy Adams are nominated for Best Supporting Actor and Actress respectively, and Joaquin Phoenix is nominated for Best Actor, but no credit was given to Paul Thomas Anderson for his directing or script, both of which were phenomenal, and the film failed to appear in the Best Film nominations list. Also, unforgivably, Jonny Greenwood’s haunting yet mesmerising sound track was denied its rightful nomination in the Music, Original Score category. This is perhaps more shocking when considering the fact that Anderson’s previous film, There Will Be Blood, which The Master stands beside resolutely and proudly, was nominated for 8 awards, and for all of the most sought after categories.

In a year of excellent films The Master still manages to hold its head above the water and more frequently than not push others beneath the surface. It seems obvious, therefore, that it is the film’s ‘sensitive’ subject matter that has caused it to suffer in the eyes of the Academy. It is perhaps inevitable that a film that openly discusses or reveals the more unusual or cruel practices of a Church, or more accurately of an organisation that bears resemblance to a Church, so well routed within Hollywood society, is going to be side-lined in favour of less politically volatile films. No doubt the Academy or Hollywood in general would wish to avoid incurring the wrath of an organisation that houses so many of its successful stars, but this does not detract away from the fact that The Master has been cheated of its nominations. It is evident that Anderson’s film has been hampered since its inception because of its subject matter. Harvey Weinstein, the manager of the studio that produced the film, said in a BBC article how he and Anderson were repeatedly told to abandon the project by colleagues and how a certain religious organisation was putting pressure on the studio to stop production.

The Church of Scientology, of course, denies all these claims, and the very fact than the film was still made is indicative of the waning influence of the Church in Hollywood. However, it is not unreasonable to presume that a film that has such a subject matter, even if it is still only loosely based on actual events, is going to be denied the publicity it deserves through nominations in the Oscars. Of course, the Oscars have never really been truly representative of the best films of the year, often opting for big names rather than better films, but it does seem curious that a film that has both big names and critical worth has been left by the wayside. When looking at the current Best Picture nominations, The Master contends with the best of them, and there really does seem to be no other reason for its scarcity other than the zealousness of certain individuals in Hollywood. The film is undeniably excellent if slightly hard-going and despite its relative absence from the award ceremonies is essential viewing.

http://www.nouse.co.uk/2013/02/14/oscars-2013-did-scientology-ruin-the-masters-hopes-for-the-oscars/
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« Reply #104 on: February 26, 2013, 07:48:12 AM »

                                  The Master Tops Weekly Blu-ray Releases
By Swanni

Washington, D.C. (February 25, 2013) - The Master, the critically-praised, Scientology-inspired drama starring Philip Seymour Hoffman and Joaquin Phoenix, will be released on Blu-ray tomorrow, February 26, leading the list of new releases this week on high-def disc

The Master, which was directed by Paul Thomas Anderson (Boogie Nights, There Will Be Blood), won numerous awards this year for Best Picture and acting. You can order The Master on Blu-ray for $19.99 by clicking here: The Master.

By the way, Argo, which won last night's Best Picture Oscar, can be ordered on Blu-ray for $22.99 by clicking here: Argo.

Other new releases also likely to stir excitement among Blu-ray fans this week: Chasing Mavericks; Africa; Silent Hill: Revelation 3D; and The Eagles' concert film, Farewell Live from Melbourne.

http://www.tvpredictions.com/bluweek022513.htm
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