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« on: June 21, 2010, 10:22:08 AM »

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1wGwsbwqNb8

Part one of six.

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« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2010, 09:37:29 PM »

i just watched these.  I'm gobsmacked!!  What a sick Fucker Hubbard was!!!

Hana is a very polite articulate speaker.
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« Reply #2 on: June 22, 2010, 04:23:38 PM »


The Church of Scientology does not want you to see L. Ron Hubbard's woman-hatin' book chapter
By Alan Scherstuhl, Monday, Jun. 21 2010 @ 8:00AM
Comments (39)
Categories: Studies in Crap

 The trouble with having a religion founded by a crazy writer is that crazy writers tend to write crazy shit. Traditionally, the Church of Scientology has handled this by making access to the craziest of L. Ron Hubbard's jabberings a reward you might earn in exchange for having blown thousands of hours and dollars. (Scientology is to religion what Farmville is to games.)

But what do you do when your founder drops this in a cheap-o paperback?

    "A society in which women are taught anything but the management of a family, the care of men, and the creation of the future generation is a society which is on its way out."

That's from "A Woman's Creativity," a chapter omitted from reprints of Hubbard's 1965 book Scientology: A New Slant on Life. In "A Woman's Creativity," Hubbard also observes,

    "The historian can peg the point where a society begins its sharpest decline at the instant when women begin to take part, on an equal footing with men, in political and business affairs, since this means that the men are decadent and the women are no longer women. This is not a sermon on the role or position of women; it is a statement of bald and basic fact."

And:

    "If man is to rise to greater heights, then women must rise with him or even before him. But she must rise as woman and not as, today, she is being misled into rising - as a man. It is the hideous joke of frustrated, unvirile men to make women over into the travesty of men, which men themselves have become."

Scientologists reprinted A New Slant on Life in 1988, two years after Hubbard's death. "A Woman's Creativity" and seven other chapters went missing in the new edition. This demonstrates rare sensitivity on the part of a church that once published photos of a guy dressed as the prophet Mohammad standing in a subservient position to a Scientology auditor.

The 2007 edition, which retails for $30, leaves out 17 of Hubbard's original chapters, including paranoid gems "Records of the Mind are Permanent," "Confronting," and "Freedom vs. Entrapment." These have been replaced by more conventional self-help claptrap ("How to Handle the Confusions of the Workaday World") allegedly found in Hubbard's papers. Not all Scientologists believe this.

Still, the reprint is good enough that it has received 34 5-star Amazon reviews, including five anonymous (and amusingly similar) raves on a single day in 1997.

Since all those happy readers are being denied the full L. Ron experience, your Crap Archivist is pleased to present the chapter "A Woman's Creativity" in its entirety.

Plenty more here...


http://blogs.villagevoice.com/runninscared/archives/2010/06/the_church_of_s.php
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« Reply #3 on: June 25, 2010, 01:43:24 PM »

An interesting article.
http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~dst/Library/S...gion.html#rpf2

Here is an excerpt:

Quote:
One of the tragedies in this debate is that normal Scientologists will feel persecuted and threatened. These people likely know nothing about RPF conditions, and they genuinely feel that Scientology involvement has benefitted them. The organization to which they belong, however, appears to be committing serious human rights abuses. Consequently, I conclude my presentation by highlighting areas of concern raised by examining the United Nations' 1948 resolution entitled The International Bill of Human Rights (United Nations, 1996b), and the 1996 International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (United Nations, 1996a).
First, Scientology's procedures involving committees of evidence, sec checking, gang bang sec checking, and the two RPF programs almost certainly violate Articles 9 and 10 of the Bill. Article 9 protects people against "arbitrary arrest, detention or exile" while article 10 guarantees "a fair and public hearing by an independent and impartial tribunal, in the determination of his [sic] rights and obligations and of any criminal charge against him" (United Nations, 1996: 23).
Second, Scientology's punishment of members for merely discussing the merits of Hubbard's teachings, as well as its invasive probing into people's thoughts though sec checking, almost certainly violate Articles 18 and 19 of the Bill that deal with both "the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion" and "the right to freedom of opinion and expression" (United Nations, 1996: 25).
Third, the various Scientology practices and procedures that I discussed may violate Article 17 of the Bill, which states that "[n]o one shall be subjected to arbitrary or unlawful interference with his privacy, family, home or correspondence, nor to unlawful attacks on his honour and reputation" (United Nations, 1996: 49).
Fourth, the conditions of the RPF and the RPF's RPF almost certainly violate Article 7 of the Covenant, which discusses "the right of everyone to the enjoyment of just and favourable conditions of work..." (United Nations, 1996a: 38). The article specifically identifies fair wages, "[a] decent living for themselves and their families..., afe and healthy working conditions..., and [r]est, leisure, and reasonable limitation of working hours and periodic holidays with pay...." (United Nations, 1996a: 38). Indeed, many Sea Org jobs themselves may not meet these reasonable standards of propriety, safety, and fairness.
Fifth and finally, the extreme social psychological assaults and forced confessions that RPF and RPF's RPF inmates suffer almost certainly violate Article 12 of the Covenant, which recognizes "the right of everyone to enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health" (United Nations, 1996a: 18)

http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?t=18842
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« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2011, 10:59:43 AM »

                  How to save your marraiges

                                              By L Ron Hubbard

http://www.ronthenut.org/northrup.htm
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« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2011, 03:26:54 PM »

                    L Ron Hubbard's abuses and violence

There are even some accounts here that I hadn`t heard before...
Of course all these accounts are written by apostates !
They are well known for gross exaggeration and lying.
And as we all know, Hubbard never lied or exaggerated.
He was freeing people from their banks. One account at a time.



http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?25404-L-Ron-Hubbard-s-abuses-and-violence
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« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2011, 04:51:48 PM »

From 'Terra Incognita: The Mind':

"The best stimulant is Benzedrine. In its absence an overdose of coffee will do."


From 'Dianetics, The Modern Science of Mental Health' (1950):

"Opium is less harmful [than alcohol], marijuana is not only less physically harmful but also better in the action of keeping a neurotic producing, phenobarbital does not dull the senses nearly as much and produces less after effect..."


From a 'Philadelphia Doctorate Course' lectures (1952):

Lecture 27: "The body - He has never used it. He's taken care of it."

Lecture 33: "There isn't any reason it [the being] shouldn't drink all the liquor it can hold... be perfectly free to use the body in any way he chooses."


Ron Jr. from 'Messiah or Madman?' (concerning the 1950s):

"My whole life I've always marvelled at his capacity to consume alcohol and remain upright and coherent. A fifth of Myers dark run was like two aspirin to dad...

"He [Hubbard Sr.] would sit at his typewriter late at night and boost up on drugs and hit way at the top, and just write like crazy. He could type 97 words a minute with four fingers. That was the maximum the old IBM electric typewriter would go. When he got into one of these drugs trips, he'd write until the body just collapsed.

"That's the way he worked. Usually what he had written in a burst would then be allowed to trickle out to the public, the classes he taught. It just wouldn't show up right away."


'Challenge', a poster on ESMB, and an old timer who knew Hubbard, and even smoked a joint with him in 1953 in Phoenix, has written of Hubbard's drug use in the 1950s. Alan Walter, Clear #8 and graduate of the first Class VIII course, wrote of his drug use in the 1960s.


Hubbard's bottle a night at St. Hill, and how it was discreetly discarded the next morning:
http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?4642-Children-working-in-quot-the-pit-quot&p=72911#post72911

From 'Keeping Scientology Working' (1965):

"We will not speculate here on... how I came to rise above the bank."


A few excerpts from the John McMaster interview in the book, 'Messiah or Madman?' (McMaster was "the first real Clear"):

"...In all the years of working for him I found that he absolutely despised people for being Scientologists."

McMaster commented on an encounter with Hubbard at St. Hill, when he urgently needed to relay a message:

"Well, it was about mid day. He was just getting up. He was a night owl. Anyway, I got up there and he was in his bathroom, which was attached to his bedroom. He came out and I was surprised at the color of his body. It was grey. He came out nude.

"And there on the table was one of those enormous bottles of Gin."

On the Apollo, McMaster witnessed Hubbard's drug supply, "It was the largest drug chest I had ever seen. He had everything!"


From Aleister Crowley's 'The Book of the Law':

"We have nothing with the outcast and the unfit; let them die in their misery. For they feel not. Compassion is the vice of Kings: stamp down the wretched and the weak: this is the law of the strong: this is our law and the joy of the world.

"...I am the snake that giveth knowledge and delight, and stir the hearts of men with drunkenness. To worship me take wine and strange drugs. They shall not harm ye at all. It is a lie, this folly against self...

"...The Kings of Earth shall be the Kings forever: the slaves shall serve.

"Them that seek to entrap thee, to overthrow thee, them attack without pity or quarter; and destroy them utterly."

The 'Law of Thelema' is "Do What Thou Wilt." For Crowleyites, its "Bible" is 'The Book of The Law'. http://www.lawbright.com/logdos/crow.jpg

From one of Jack Parsons' letters to Aleister Crowley, re. Hubbard: "He [Hubbard] is the most Thelemic person I have ever met..."


And from Jack Parsons, Hubbard's "Magic(k)al partner" for a time in 1946. Parsons wrote this poem, which appeared in 1943, in the 'Oriflamme' Journal of the O.T.O:

"I hight Don Quixote, I live on Peyote, Marijuana,
"Morphine and Cocaine,
"I never know sadness, but only a madness,
"That burns in the heart and the brain.
"I see each charwoman, ecstatic, inhuman, angelic, demonic, divine.
"Each wagon a dragon, each beer mug a flagon
"That burns with ambrosial wine."


Some more links re. alcohol and drugs:

http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~dst/OTIII/bts-or-dts.txt

http://www.holysmoke.org/dp000/16.htm


There are two tapes that come to mind where Hubbard appeared to be inebriated. One is a 1952 'PDC' lecture where he goes on about "Liberty, Equality, Eternity," and the other is - I believe - an FEBC tape, from around 1970, where he shouts, "Communista! Communista!'

Originally Posted by DartSmohen View Post
What you do not get here are the numerous breaks in the lectures.

Sometimes a ship's horn would drown him out, some times he went into a violent burst of profanity, sometimes he got annoyed that someone was not paying total attention, or coughing. He would verbally abuse them (Hank Laarhuis)

if they coughed.He would have the tape wound back and continue with the delivery.

Listening to this again makes one realise that he was completely "away with the fairies".

The slip-ups (DC-8 with propellers etc) can be picked up quite easily.

Interesting that he is into the "the people will obey you" routine, "we own the planet" (Did TC use this as his mantra?).

The sad thing is that he completely believed his fantasies were reality.

I suppose that is one of the liabilities of a chronic drug history.

When you see the photos of him when in hiding, he looks a wreck. This is a man ravaged by self-abuse and personal neglect.

Clearly he "freewheeled" down the tone scale into hiding.

Maybe GOLD, SP Hall and the RPF are Incident 111 ?
Quote Originally Posted by Alan View Post
You really had to be there, at that time, in that place, Corfu, Oct, 1968 - the Original Class VIII Course was a complete continuous implant from beginning to end.

The overboards, the lack of sleep, the poor food, the chronically unsafe environment, the threats, the invalidation, the evaluations of what to run, what to think about your case, violated every aspect of the Auditors Code and ALL other Scio Codes.

The hours were from 7.30 am.......until long after Midnight - every day. Sleep deprivation abounded. (I handled this for myself by putting an "in session" sign on my cabin door and taking a 3 hour nap.)

The stress level was enormous - the amount of continuous violence, hatred, contempt and make nothing of emanating from LRH and the Commordore Staff - of each person there was incredible.

One could say that this was in actuality started in September, 1967 - in Las Palmas - it was then that the sleep deprivation and brutality began......slowly it got worse.......the SO people on the ship began to become shadows of themselves - this can be easily observed in the BBC interview of the crew in early 1968.

Very little auditing or training took place on the crews during this period. Mostly quicky stuff.

Alan

http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?25404-L-Ron-Hubbard-s-abuses-and-violence/page6
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« Reply #7 on: November 20, 2011, 04:29:31 PM »

                                Starrating Ron on OT III


September 28th, 2009 •

I recently compared Scientology founder and former director L. Ron Hubbard’s OT III scripture, which he wrote in 1967 in the Canaries, with his novella Revolt in the Stars, which he wrote in 1977 while hiding out in Sparks, Nevada.

Both writings contain a number of identical “facts,” and both inarguably tell the Xenu story, which Hubbard got certifiably indoctrinated Scientologists to implant in themselves. Once Scientologists make it up their “bridge to total freedom” as far as “advanced level” OT III, they “run” themselves through Hubbard’s Xenu story hundreds or even thousands of times. The Scientologists’ implanting certainly goes on much longer on average than 36 days, which was the duration Hubbard said in scripture that Xenu implanted his victims.

Hubbard installed in Scientologists, as part of the implant, the delusion that they’re running their “body thetans” through the Xenu story, and that their BTs are scanning through or reliving the story’s incidents. It’s obvious, however, that it’s the Scientologists themselves that are spending all the time making the story “realer” and “realer,” and more solid.

Body thetans, Scientologists learn as part of their group implant, are “spirits” or “beings” that the Xenu story happened to 75 million years ago, and which now infest and comprise human body parts.

Hubbard also got his implanted Scientologists to get other people to implant themselves, and charged them all, implanters and the implantees, enormous sums of money for the implant.

Before auto-implanting the Xenu story, which Scientologists do with an array of Hubbard’s instructions, procedures and techniques, they implant themselves with his instruction that the story is scientifically researched and completely factual, the exact time, place, form and event.

The Scientologists implant Hubbard’s instruction that the Xenu story is common to their BTs, which, because of that story, cause the Scientologists’ unOTness, their humanness, and their other problems or non-optimum conditions. The Scientologists also implant Hubbard’s instruction that they must follow his implanting sequences and procedures in order to eliminate these problems and unwanted humanoid conditions.

Serendipitously, I just reread Hubbard’s science fiction novella Seven Steps to the Arbiter, which was originally published as The Kingslayer, copyright 1949 by Fantasy Publishing Co., Inc., and discovered a clear connection to the same Xenu story.

The hero in Seven Steps, Christopher (Kit) Randolph Kellan, is, like the hero in many of Hubbard’s stories, Ron himself, a red or golden haired man with superhuman abilities and intelligence, and, of course, superhuman charm and success with a superbeautiful babe. Adding the letter “e,” Hubbard had Kit go to the same high school Hubbard had gone to, although Kit graduated 2030 years later. Perhaps even more amazingly, Seven Steps had, in 1949, what Hubbard’s cult of Scientology is now universally lampooned 60 years later for having, a dwarf.

    “From which school did you receive your master of theoretical engineering philosophy?” said Lapham.

    “College of Nuclear Physics, Martian University,” said Kit.

    “Hmm,” said Lapham. “You are certain.”

    “Of course I am. My sheepskin was stolen but Mars should be able to send the record.”

    “We have heard from Mars,” said the dwarf, pulling out a light-thin letter. “They state that whereas you may have been a student there, no record is available in their files.”

    Kit started to speak hotly and then snatched at his temper and controlled it. He had argued once too often, that was why he was here.

    “You finished high school right here in Washington, D.C.,” said the dwarf, “but we have no further record. In 3960 you were given high school examinations at Woodwarde Prep of this city and passed them it says with honors…”

While Hubbard was always a chubby, soft endomorph, of course, Kit was, as Hubbard’s heroes almost always were, a broad shouldered, hard bodied, athletic mesomorph.

    By six o’clock Kit was stripped to the waist, his splendid torso agleam with sweat, his gold hair burning like a torch and his eyes bright with inspiration through the mask of grease.

Hubbard’s hero Rawl, who vanquished Xenu, the Supreme Ruler of the Galactic Confederation, and his renegades, and put him in an electronic mountain trap where he still is, was also a mesomorphic marvel.

    Rawl was smiling good-naturedly. He was a tall, athletic man, handsome in a blunt sort of way. He wore the plain khaki trousers, blouse and cap of a Loyal Officer.

    The Announcer stood on tiptoe to see better over his mikes. “Rawl, the Loyal Officer in charge of Earth. Rawl, Speaker of the Congress! You have heard his name connected with every great deed and decency!”

What positively links Seven Steps to the Xenu story, however, are the stars.

Hubbard identifies the twenty-one member stars in Xenu’s Galactic Confederation as Sirius, Canopus, Alpha Centauri, Vega, Capella, Arcturus, Rigel, Procyon, Achernar, Beta Centauri, Altair, Betelgeuse, Acrux, Aldebaran, Pollux, Spica, Antares, Fomalhaut, Deneb, Regulus and Sol.

In Seven Steps, Hubbard identifies the Six Nations that the Arbiter, the head of the Galactic Arbitration Council, rules as Terra, Centauri, Vega, Sirius, Procyon and Aldeberan.

    Kit scratched his gold hair and looked at the dead man. Kit’s nose was stubbed, and wrinkled when he was worried. “I haven’t called you a renegade. … Oh! Perhaps you belong to a group that wants to undermine the Six Nations, or…”

    “Ah, yes. Terra, Centauri, Vega, Sirius, Procyon and Aldeberan. Henry! I say, how’s that. Remember every single one of the six nations…”

Hubbard also mentions Spica in Seven Steps, although not as one of the Six Nations.

Ralph Hilton wrote in his entry in the 1999 ARS Literati $10,000 Challenge:

    The film script “Revolt in the Stars” was intended to reveal these events to the current populace of Earth in a way that would send them into Scientology in droves. The script states that the stars of the Galactic Federation were:

    “Sirius, Canopus, Alpha Centauri, Vega, Capella, Arcturus, Rigel, Procyon, Achernar, Beta Centauri, Altair, Betelgeuse, Acrux, Aldebaran, Pollux, Spica, Antares, Fomalhaut, Deneb, Regulus and Sol”

    The “Hamlyn Guide to Astronomy” by David Baker in 1978 lists the 20 brightest stars from Earth as:

    “Sirius, Canopus, Alpha Centauri, Arcturus, Vega, Capella, Rigel, Procyon, Achernar, Betelgeuse, Beta Centauri, Altair, Aldebaran, Acrux, Antares, Spica, Fomalhaut, Pollux, Deneb, Beta Crucis”

    […] The distances of these stars from Earth vary widely – a developing federation would surely choose stars closer together rather than those brightest from Earth. I find the conclusion almost inevitable that his list of stars came not from whole track recall but a brief study of an astronomy book.
    http://www.holysmoke.org/minton/arslc/hilton.htm

I couldn’t obtain a copy of Hamlyn’s Guide, but plenty of other writers, or astronomers, and even astrologers, have listed the same twenty brightest stars, as seen from Teegeeack, and in essentially the same order Hubbard listed the twenty stars that, along with Sol, formed the Galactic Federation.

http://www.wegryn.com/sci/speaking/Stars.htm

http://tinyurl.com/nr6lld

It’s generally agreed that there’s something like 1022 to 1024 stars in the Universe.  esa.int/esaSC/SEM75BS1VED_index_0.html That’s between 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 and 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000, or between ten sextillion and a septillion stars.

I’ll let some else do the math who knows how to multiply by all kinds of zeros better than I can. I have concluded, however, that the odds of Hubbard coming up with his list of the stars in his Galactic Federation through his own scientific research are only slightly better than the odds of him coming up with the rest of Scientology scripture or “tech” through scientific research.

For implanted Scientologists, of course, the fact that Hubbard’s star list in the Xenu story matches the brightest-stars-as-seen-from-earth list, is proof of the unbelievable accuracy of his whole track recall.

Hubbard’s last sea assignment during World War II was Navigating Officer on the USS Algol, an attack cargo ship. He later claimed that his adventures on the Algol were reported as those of the title character in the movie Mr. Roberts, which was pure BS; but he really was a navigator, and trained in celestial navigation. He’d sailed before the war, in fact really did sail the Inland Passage from Puget Sound to Alaska, so was competent in celestial navigation from that period.

All the stars Hubbard said comprised the Six Nations in Seven Steps can be found on the list of 57 or 58 navigational stars.  wikipedia.org/wiki/Navigational_stars

Centauri from Seven Steps could be Alpha Centauri, which is listed as navigational star Rigil Kentaurus, or Beta Centauri, listed as navigational star Hadar, or both stars. Wikipedia says: “Most of these stars are a subset of the list of brightest stars and are defined by convention and nautical tradition.”

I think that when Hubbard wrote Seven Steps in the 1940’s, he pulled the stars in his Six Nations, plus Spica (the ear of corn), out of his celestial navigation knowledge. He started the OT III scripture with the words, “The head of the Galactic Confederation (76 planets around larger stars visible from here).” He didn’t name them. In Revolt, he said that there were 21 stars, with the same 76 planets. As quoted above, he also lists the GC’s stars in Revolt, in pretty well the same order as everyone else lists the twenty brightest stars as seen from earth.

I think that his stars list is the biggest clue, and admission, he provided everyone that he was scamming them. He dramatized what he called the “criminal mind” intent on being found out. Probably no one in the sf community called him on his celestial nav ripoff in 1949. Nobody called him really on the Xenu story and its “larger stars visible from here.” He had to write Revolt and match the 20 Brightest Stars list to let everyone know, far, far beyond any reasonable doubt that it was all fiction. And if there were any facts, like the stars, they were simply cynically and shamelessly stolen.

Gerry Armstrong

http://www.gerryarmstrong.org/archives/4646
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« Reply #8 on: September 11, 2012, 08:51:04 AM »

The 1964 article that broke "Dr" LRH's spirit forever - EXPOSED - Ron the Con!


http://www.saturdayeveningpost.com/wp-content/uploads/satevepost/have-you-ever-been-a-boo-hoo-by-hames-phelan-saturday-evening-post.pdf
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« Reply #9 on: April 29, 2013, 10:32:45 PM »

                        Hubbard's Naval career in the South Pacific.

                            A must read for any serious students of Scientology con.



This took 3-4 months full time to research. Hubbard's and many others Naval records

from WW2 are incomplete, and he spent much of his time working for the Army

and not the navy. He was also involved with intelligence activities which possibly

meant some documents were not available.

Terril park


http://scientologymyths.com/hubbardww2.htm

http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?31535-Hubbard-sNaval-carreer-in-the-South-Pacific
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« Reply #10 on: November 09, 2014, 03:51:42 PM »

                                                      Ron Hubbard & Aleister Crowley

http://www.jesus-is-savior.com/False%20Religions/Scientology/aleister_crowley.htm
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« Reply #11 on: May 24, 2015, 08:18:40 AM »

                                                      Biography of LRH in "Ability" magazine Jan 1959
While looking for something else, I came upon this "biography" of LRH published in "Ability" magazine in January of 1959. Right around the time he was fiddling with tomato plants:

http://www.wiseoldgoat.com/papers-scientology/popup-windows/scn_ability111-5901_lrh_biography.html

He was still "Dr. Hubbard" at the time, with his Sequoia University doctoral degree.

Interesting to see how OLD the lies are.


"On February 27, 1953, Hubbard cabled his associate Richard de Mille (a relative of the famous filmmaker Cecil B. DeMille) to instruct him to purchase a Ph.D. in Hubbard's name: "PLEASE INFORM DR HOUGH PHD VERY ACCEPTABLE. PRIVATELY TO YOU. FOR GOSH SAKES EXPEDITE. WORK HERE UTTERLY DEPENDENT ON IT. CABLE REPLY. RON" Shortly afterwards, Hubbard received a "Doctorate of Philosophy" from Sequoia, along with a "D. Scn" (Doctorate of Scientology) which he appears to have bestowed upon himself.[7]
The degree subsequently became a key part of his self-promotional efforts. Hubbard began referring to himself as "L. Ron Hubbard, Ph.D., C.E." [8] (the C.E. referring to an equally unearned civil engineering qualification supposedly obtained from George Washington University, from which he had dropped out in his second year of studies). He presented it as evidence of his scientific qualifications, calling himself "Doctor Hubbard".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sequoia_University

http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?39524-Biography-of-LRH-in-quot-Ability-quot-magazine-Jan-1959
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« Reply #12 on: June 19, 2015, 08:29:30 AM »

                                   Inside L. Ron Hubbard's Johannesburg mansion, where Scientology's toughest test was born

http://www.globalpost.com/article/6585391/2015/06/17/look-inside-l-ron-hubbards-johannesburg-mansion-where-scientologys-e
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